A few nice Animal Tattoos photos I discovered:

Image from page 195 of “The boy travellers in Australasia : adventures of two youths in a journey to the Sandwich, Marquesas, Society, Samoan and Feejee islands, and by way of the colonies of New Zealand, New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania, and
Animal Tattoos

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Identifier: boytravellersina00knox
Title: The boy travellers in Australasia : adventures of two youths in a journey to the Sandwich, Marquesas, Society, Samoan and Feejee islands, and by way of the colonies of New Zealand, New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania, and South Australia
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Knox, Thomas Wallace, 1835-1896 Harper &amp Brothers. pbl
Subjects: Voyages and travels Adventure and adventurers Tutors and tutoring Friendship Sailing Sailors Animals Natural history
Publisher: New York : Harper &amp Brothers

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Text Appearing Ahead of Image:
uld get thin and be laughed at by the girls of hisacquaintance. He asked his father to bury him, and the latter con-sented. When the youth had taken his spot in the grave he asked tobe strang-led. The father scolded him, and told him to sit nevertheless and beburied just like other people, and make no additional trouble. Thereuponthe youth became quiet, and the burial was completed. Can this actually be correct V queried the youth. 172 thp: boy travellers in Australasia. The story is discovered on web page 475 of Erskines Journal of a Cruiseamong the Islands of the Western Pacific, said his informant, andI have no doubt whatever of its truth. The proof as to the formercustoms of the Feejeeans is so direct and positive that it cannot bodoubted. Fred lav awake for some time that night, his thoughts busy withthe adjustments which had been wrought in the islands of the great oceanthrough the labors of the missionaries. Afterwards he watched theeffect of the moonlight on the waters, and although watching fell asleep.

Text Appearing Right after Image:
MOONLIGHT ON THE WATERS. A HINT FOK CHUKCH-WARDENS. 173 CHAPTER VIII. ATTENDING A NATIVE CHURCH.—A FEEJEEAN TREACHER.—DINNER WITH A Fee-JEEAN Household.—THE SEASONS IN FEEJEE.—A TROPICAL SHOWER.—A HURRI-CANE.—A PLANTERS ADVENTURES.—SCENES OF DEVASTATION.—THE CLIMATEOF THE FEEJEE ISLANDS.—WRECKED ON A REEF.—ESCAPING FROM THE JAWSOF CANNIBALS. —A WALKING ART GALLERY. —A TATTOOED WHITE MAN.—RETURNING TO SUVA.—THE FRIENDLY, OR TONGA, ISLANDS.—TONGATABOO.—THE KING OF THE TONGAS.—HOW HE LIVES.—A Outstanding CAVERN ANDA Enjoy STORY ABOUT IT.—FROM FEEJEE TO NEW ZEALAND.—HAURAKI GULF.—AUCKLAND.—A FINE SEAPORT AND ITS COMMERCE.—HOW NEW ZEALANDWAS COLONIZED.—THE MAORIS.—CURIOUS Facts ABOUT A CURIOUS Individuals.—MISSIONARIES IN NEW ZEALAND.—HOW THE MAORIS MAKE WAR. P^HE second day of the keep of our buddies at Levuka was Sunday,-L and the celebration attended the Episcopal church in the forenoon,exactly where service was performed by a clergyman who had not too long ago arr

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Image from web page 227 of “The boy travellers in Australasia : adventures of two youths in a journey to the Sandwich, Marquesas, Society, Samoan and Feejee islands, and via the colonies of New Zealand, New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania, and
Animal Tattoos

Image by World wide web Archive Book Photos
Identifier: boytravellersina00knox
Title: The boy travellers in Australasia : adventures of two youths in a journey to the Sandwich, Marquesas, Society, Samoan and Feejee islands, and by way of the colonies of New Zealand, New South Wales, Queensland, Victoria, Tasmania, and South Australia
Year: 1889 (1880s)
Authors: Knox, Thomas Wallace, 1835-1896 Harper &amp Brothers. pbl
Subjects: Voyages and travels Adventure and adventurers Tutors and tutoring Friendship Sailing Sailors Animals Natural history
Publisher: New York : Harper &amp Brothers

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Pictures: All Photos From Book

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A PAKEHA MAORI S House. Frank asked what goods they wanted most. Muskets and ammunition, was tlie reply, and for these they paidfabulous prices in wild flax, which was the principal item worthshipping aAvay. They were continually at war, and the tribe that pos-sessed the white mans weapons could destroy any tribe that was with-out them. This occurred in a lot of instances, and complete tribes who werewithout guns have been destroyed by their far more fortunate adversaries. Theywere literally eaten up, as the natives have been cannibals in these times. 204 THE BOY TRAVELLERS IN AUSTRALASIA. To get muskets they impoverish themselves, neglecting their agri-culture in order to gather flax to buy them with, and literally starvingthemselves. Numerous died of starvation in consequence, and in anotherway muskets proved the death of these who owned them. In the timesof clubs and spears the Maoris had their pahs and villages on high hills,

Text Appearing Soon after Image:
VIEW OF A Element OF AUCKLAND AND ITS HARBOR. where the air was pure and the ground dry when they got musketsthey moved into the low ground, where they have been carried off by thedampness and its consequent fevers. I have identified entire villages andtribes killed in this way, so that not 1 man, lady, or child remained.The musket was as fatal to those who owned it as to those who didnot it was deadly either way. l^ow about some of the customs of the Maoris. They used to betattooed very finely, and some of the fighting-guys have been beautiful tolook at. The warriors used to bring back the heads of those they killedin battle, and some of the traders got to buying these heads providedthey were finely tattooed. They gave a musket for a excellent head, and assoon as this was known some of the tribes started to make war on othersjust for the sake of acquiring tattooed heads to sell. You may possibly believe it strange, gentlemen, stated the pakeha, but Iveknown the head of a reside man to be sold and paid for beforehand, anda

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