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Image from page 324 of “Annual report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution” (1895)
Indian Tattoos

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Identifier: annualreportofbu117smit
Title: Annual report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution
Year: 1895 (1890s)
Authors: Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology
Subjects: Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology Ethnology Indians
Publisher: Washington : U. S. Govt. Print. Off.

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Snake-skin belt. The custom is apparently obsolete, and absolutely nothing is identified straight ofdetails or motives. pjxcepting these mutilations the corporeal decoration of the Seri isapparently limited to the face-painting: amongst the 00 individuals atGosta Rica in 1804 there was no trace of tattooing or scarification offace, limbs, or physique there were no labrets or earrings, and neitherlips nor ears have been pierced, nor were nasal septa observed to be per-forated in accordance with the reputed ancient custom the teeth wereneither tiled nor drilled no indications of amputation or other maim-ing (save the removal of the incisors) had been observed—indeed, theinstinct for physical markings of symbolic or decorative character,which seems to be typical to primitive males, was apparently satisfiedby the prevalent and persistent face-painting amongst the females. The extra-corporeal decorative devices are of a meagerness and pov- Travels, p. 286. BUREAU OF AMERICAN ETHNOLOGY SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT PL, XXVII

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SERI FACE PAINTING PARAPHERNALIA MCGEF] Additional-CORPOREAL DECORATION V erty even transcencling the poor apparel, flimsy liabitatious, and gen-erally ill-developert artifacts of the lowly tribe. The most prominent ])ersoiial ])ossession is the pelican-skin robe itis usually made of six skins, slightly dressed and in complete plumage, sewedtogether with sinew iu a traditional pattern of such sort as to givethe greatest feasible expanse consistent with the irregular outlines ofthe person skins, and at the identical time to disi)lay a conventionalcolor pattern on the feathered side, the colors ranging from the dorsalslate to the ventral white of the fowl (as Indicated in plate xxiii)occasionally there are only 4 skins and rarely there are eight, but theconventional arrangement is maintained. Before the beginning of a

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Image from web page 200 of “University of California publications in American archaeology and ethnology” (1903)
Indian Tattoos

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Identifier: universityofcali15univ
Title: University of California publications in American archaeology and ethnology
Year: 1903 (1900s)
Authors: University of California (1868-1952) University of California (1868-1952) Publications in American archaeology and ethnology
Subjects: Indians Indians of North America
Publisher: Berkeley University of California Press

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A TATTOOED IFUGAO OF KABAliUVAN DISTRICT PLATE 17 This is 1 of the ideal homes built by a Philippine population. Note thefenders on the piles to avert ingress of rats. The house is so constructedthat its extremely weight holds the frame together. [156]

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PLATE 18 This valley is not hemmed in by such steep mountains as most other districtsof Ifugao. The view is surpassingly beautiful, combining as it does the ruggedmountain ranges, the fields and huts—the operate of man—and the palms andfeathery bamboos in the foreground. The picture illustrates a function thatbears out the statement produced in the text as to the Ifugaos ability as a mountainagriculturist. Note the fields in the appropriate foreground. The hive-shaped hum-mocks comprise the superior six inches of the fields soil. This soil has beenheaped up by the females working with their bare hands in order that it perhaps aerated and the decomposition of partially decayed vegetable matter completed. [158]

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