Some cool Reduce back Tattoos photos:

Image from web page 213 of “Expeditions organized or participated in by the Smithsonian Institution..” (1912)
Lower back Tattoos

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Identifier: expeditionsorgan191013191516smit
Title: Expeditions organized or participated in by the Smithsonian Institution..
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Smithsonian Institution
Subjects: Scientific expeditions
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : Smithsonian Institution

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Fig 64.—An Osage Indian with tattouing. Figure 64 shows designs tattooed u])on the l)ody of a man. Thoseon a woman are a lot more elaborate and cover the upper portion of herbody, breast and back, and the decrease portion of her legs. Figure 65 shows 68 SMITHSONTAX M ISCELI.ANEOrS COLLECTIONS VOL. 63 3 implements utilized in tattooing. Each of these is produced ofwood aljout the length of a pencil. To the lower finish are attachedneedles arranged in a straight row, and to the upper finish are fastenedfour tiny rattles created of the massive wing (|uills of the |)elican. This

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Fig. 65.—Three implements utilised inOsage tattooing. PlKitograpli 1)DeLancev Cil!. bird is referred to in one particular of the dream rituals as. AIo/-thi//-the-do/-tsa-ge, He-who-becomes-really-old-although-but-going. In specific pas-sages of the ritual it is intimated that these implements had been origi-nally made of the wing bone of this bird and were utilized for doctoringas effectively as for tattooing. NO. eight SMITHSONIAN ENPLORATIONS, I913 69 The coloring matter employed in tattooing is produced of charcoalmixed with kettle black and water. The charcoal is produced fromcertain trees that serve as symbols of lengthy life in the war ceremonies.Tail feathers of the pileated Avoodpecker are nsed for ])utting on theink and drawing the lines. ( )n Xovemljer 17, 1910. a-ce-to/-zhi-ga, one particular of the prominentmen of the Ia-ci-n-gthi// band (Hill-top Dwellers) died. It waslearned that he had a a-x()-be-to-ga, a (ireat a-x6-be. Thisis a white pelican, the l)ir(l which is supposed to have revealed,by way of a dream, the mvst

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Image from web page 365 of “The bird, its form and function” (1906)
Lower back Tattoos

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Identifier: birditsformfuncti00beeb
Title: The bird, its type and function
Year: 1906 (1900s)
Authors: Beebe, William, 1877-1962
Subjects: Birds — Anatomy Birds — Physiology
Publisher: New York, H. Holt and company

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Fig. 276.—Trumpeter Swan asleep. sight, the mice and birds have of its deadly presence.Few birds have a flight as noiseless as that of owls, andin some species the motion of the wings makes, as wenoticed in the pheasant, a very audible sound. When awidgeon rises from the water, the whistling of its quills,so dear to the ears of the sportsman, is very shrill. Adove claps its wings together above its back while gain-ing impetus for flight. The characteristic sound fromwhich a hummingbird takes its name is properly recognized. 34^ The Bird When wild geese and swans nest in captivity, theirwings are put to most excellent use as weapons of de-fence, and of course this use should come into play fre-quently when nesting in their native haunts. I haveseen a man knocked breathless by a Canada gander whothought his nest in danger. When preparing for attack,the bird approaches hissing, with head stretched low alongthe ground, and suddenly, without warning, launches

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Fig 277.—Trumpeter Swan preparing to attack an intruder with its wings. itself straight at ones breast and, clinging with bill andclaws, beats a tattoo with the tough bend of its wings.1 is not most likely to overlook such a drubbing for a longtime. The wings of certain birds are armed with weaponsof offence, such as the Spur-winged Goose, Jacana, Plover,and Screamer. The Spur-winged Goose is a truly danger-ous antagonist and can strike extremely robust blows,bringing the sharp spur to bear with telling effect. These Wings 347 spurs are not claws, but correspond in structure to theordinary spurs on tlie legs of a rooster. The excellent heavy-headed and heavy-bodied hornbillsfly with fantastic effort, and it is stated upon excellent authoritythat when passing low overhead they make a noise likea steam-engine. Even though not strictly inside the prov-

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Please note that these pictures are extracted from scanned web page pictures that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not completely resemble the original perform.