A couple of good Polynesian Tattoos images I discovered:

Image from web page 133 of “Basic guide to the exhibition halls of the American Museum of All-natural History” (1911)
Polynesian Tattoos

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Identifier: generalguide34amer
Title: General guide to the exhibition halls of the American Museum of Organic History
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: American Museum of All-natural History Sherwood, George Herbert, 1876-1937 Lucas, Frederic A. (Frederic Augustus), 1852-1929 Miner, Roy Waldo, 1875-1955
Subjects: American Museum of Organic History All-natural history museums
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : American Museum of Natural History

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a and Australia.However, it proved impossible to be wholly consistent and to separateMelanesian Fiji from Samoa and Tonga. In the Polynesian section the examples of decorated native barkcloth (tapa) are especially noteworthy, and a quantity of canoe modelsremind us that these men and women are daring seafarers. A series of ceremonial 132 Gather 1()S FROM THE PACIFIC ISLANDS adzes from the (!ook Islands in the northeastern quarter of the hall showsaboriginal carving at its highest level. In the western section the elaborately carved sacred masks, about 14feet back of the Tahitian priest, illustrate the aesthetic tendencies ofMelanesia, which are also apparent in a carved pole set on top of avertical case. Quite distinct from these artistic manifestations are thecarvings of the New Zealanders (Maori) characterized by the dominantspiral motive. A series of dried and tattooed Maori heads types one particular ofthe most outstanding exhibits in the Museum. (See Guide Leaflet No.71, The Maoris and their Arts.)

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HAWAIIAN FEATHER CLOAK Close to the boundary in between the two main sections are the Australiacases with several boomerangs and quite crude stone tools, whichshould be compared with those in the archaeological hall (p. 80). Thesouthwest corner is devoted to a collection from the Admiralty Islands,like a model of a village of the Manns tribe, a lagoon-dwelling,fishing people who construct their houses on piles far from land. In thenorthwest corner of the hall are shields, clubs, carvings and householdutensils from New Guinea. Southwest TowerThe Isaac Wyman Drummond Collection of carved jade, amber andivories, and skilfully wrought bronzes, has lately been installed in theSouthwest Tower. COLLECTIONS FROM THE PHILIPPINES 133 West Wing COLLECTIONS FROM NEW GUINEA, PHILIPPINES AND MALAYSIA In the hall due North of the Pacific Islands Hall, the side aisles aredevoted to the Philippine Islands. The northern section of the hallcontains exhibits from other components of Malaysia with an interesting s

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Image from page 146 of “Common guide to the exhibition halls of the American Museum of All-natural History” (1911)
Polynesian Tattoos

Image by internetarchivebookimages
Identifier: generalguide39amer
Title: General guide to the exhibition halls of the American Museum of All-natural History
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: American Museum of Natural History Sherwood, George Herbert, 1876-1937 Lucas, Frederic A. (Frederic Augustus), 1852-1929 Miner, Roy Waldo, 1875-1955
Subjects: American Museum of Organic History Organic history museums
Publisher: New York, N.Y. : American Museum of Natural History

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Photos: All Images From Book

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Text Appearing Before Image:
se garments wasproportionate to the massive labor ex-pended on their manufacture. The hall is roughly divided into twomain sections. In the 1st half are ex-hibited the collections from Polynesiaand Micronesia, while the second half isdevoted to New Guinea, Melanesia andAustralia. Nevertheless, it proved impossibleto be wholly constant and to separateMelanesian Fiji from Samoa and Tonga. In the Polynesian section the examplesof decorated native bark cloth (tapa) areespecially noteworthy, and a quantity ofcanoe models remind us that these peopleare daring seafarers. A series of ceremo-nial adzes from the Cook Islands in thefarther quarter of the hall shows aborigi-nal carving at its highest level. In the section on the right, the elabo-rately carved sacred masks, about 14 feetback of the Tahitian priest, illustrate theaesthetic tendencies of Melanesia, whichare also apparent in a carved pole set ontop of a vertical case. Very diverse fromthese artistic manifestations are the carv- [148]

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MINIATURE MODEL OF A SOUTH SEA ISLAND CANOE. The Polynesians made canoesholloued out of tree-trunks. An outrigger on a single side kept them from capsizing very easily ings of the New Zealanders (Maori) char-acterized by the dominant spiral motive.A series of dried and tattooed Maoriheads types a single of the most remarkableexhibits in the Museum. (See Guide Leaf-let No. 71, The Maoris and their Arts.) Close to the boundary among the twomain sections are the Australian caseswith several boomerangs and verycrude stone tools, which must be com-pared with those in the archaeologicalhall. The additional corner is devoted to acollection from the Admiralty Islands,like a model of a village of theManus tribe, a lagoon-dwelling, fishingpeople who develop their homes on pilesfar from land. In the left corner of thehall are shields, clubs, carvings and residence-hold utensils from New Guinea. The islands of the Pacific Ocean are oftwo types first, these which are the rem-nants of a sunken land mass runningsou

Note About Pictures
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations could not perfectly resemble the original work.