Posts Tagged ‘1842’

Image from web page 73 of “An account of the manners and customs of the modern day Egyptians, written in Egypt in the course of the years 1833-1835” (1842)

Saturday, October 25th, 2014

A couple of nice Clover Tattoos pictures I located:

Image from web page 73 of “An account of the manners and customs of the modern Egyptians, written in Egypt throughout the years 1833-1835” (1842)
Clover Tattoos

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Identifier: accountofmanners00laneuoft
Title: An account of the manners and customs of the modern day Egyptians, written in Egypt throughout the years 1833-1835
Year: 1842 (1840s)
Authors: Lane, Edward William, 1801-1876
Subjects: Egypt — Social life and customs Egypt — History 19th century
Publisher: London, Ward, Lock and co.

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a custom somewhat equivalent tothat above described : it consists in generating indelible marks of ablue or greenish hue upon the face and other parts, or, at least,upon the front of the chin, and upon the back of the proper hand,and often also upon the left hand, the correct arm, or each arms,the feet, the middle of the bosom, and the forehead : the mostcommon of these marks made upon the chin and hands are hererepresented. The operation is performed with many needles(typically seven) tied with each other : with these the skin is pricked inthe desired pattern : some smoke-black (of wood or oil), mixedwith milk from the breast of a lady, is then rubbed in andabout a week right after, before the skin has healed, a paste of thepounded fresh leaves of white beet or clover is apj^licd, and givesa blue or greenish colour to the marks: or, to create the sameeffect in a far more simple manner, some indigo is rubbed into the 34 THE Modern day EGYPTIANS. punctures, alternatively of the smoke-black, and so forth. It is generally per-

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A TATTOOED GIRL. % m WW II ( srECIMKNS OF TATTOOING ON THE CHIN.

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Image from page 101 of “The land and the Book or, Biblical illustrations drawn from the manners and customs, the scenes and scenery of the Holy Land” (1874)
Clover Tattoos

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Identifier: landbookorbibli01thom
Title: The land and the Book or, Biblical illustrations drawn from the manners and customs, the scenes and scenery of the Holy Land
Year: 1874 (1870s)
Authors: Thomson, William McClure, 1806-1894
Subjects: Bible Bible
Publisher: New York, Harper

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t that which gives such a blue tinge to their lips ? Yes and these marks on the forehead, chin, breast, arms,hands, and feet, are all different patterns and figures of thismost ancient art. The impact is any thing but agreeable toour taste. All Orientals, nevertheless, have a passion for it.Moses either instituted some such custom, or appropriatedone already current to a religious purpose. He says. Andthou shalt show thy son in that day, saying, this is carried out be-result in of that which the Lord did unto me when I cameforth out of Egypt and it shall be for a sign unto thee uponthy hand, and for a memorial in between thine eyes (or 16th)for a token upon thy hand, and for frontlets amongst thineeyes.^ This practice of marking religious tokens upon thehands and arms is almost univeisal among the Arabs, of allsects and classes. Christian pilgrims to Jerusalem have theoperation performed there, as the most holv spot identified to ■ Hub. ii. 11. » Gen. i. 19. Exod. xiii. 9 and 16. THE LAND AND THE BOOK.

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6rE(IMEN:J OK TATTOOING. their religion. T have watclied the method of imprintmgthem, and it is not a little painful. A number of needlesare bound tightly collectively in the shape of the preferred fig-ure, or so that the figure can be marked out by them. Theskin being punctured in the required pattern, particular mix-tures of coloring matter are rubbed in, and the place bound TATTOOING—FRONTLETS. 93 with a tight bandage. Gunpowder, variously prepared, isvery generally employed, and it is that which gives to thetattooing of these Bedawin its bluish tinge. Mr. Lane tellsus that in Egypt smoke-black mixed with the milk of awoman is utilized, and subsequently a paste of fresh-poundedleaves of clover, or white beet, is applied, so as to give agreenish blue colour to the marks. It is properly ascertainedthat this tattooing prevailed in Egypt even before the timeof Moses. If he appropriated it to sacred purposes, thepatterns may possibly have been so devised as to commemorate thedeliverance of the youngsters of Israe

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Image from page 377 of “Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition : in the course of the years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842” (1845)

Wednesday, October 1st, 2014

Some cool Lettering Tattoos pictures:

Image from web page 377 of “Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition : in the course of the years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842” (1845)
Lettering Tattoos

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Identifier: narrativeofunite03wilk
Title: Narrative of the United States Exploring Expedition : during the years 1838, 1839, 1840, 1841, 1842
Year: 1845 (1840s)
Authors: Wilkes, Charles, 1798-1877
Subjects: United States Exploring Expedition (1838-1842) Voyages about the globe Scientific expeditions
Publisher: Philadelphia : Lea and Blanchard

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^ ■:- ~J^A ill

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CHAPTER X. CONTENTS. GEOGRAPHICAL POSITION OF THE GROUP—SURVEYS—CLIMATE—WINDS—TIDES—EARTH-QUAKES — POPULATION — LANGUAGE — MODES OF SALUTATION — Diseases — SURGERY —SPORTS —MESSAGES —TREATMENT OF THE WOMEN—AGRICULTURE—PLANTS—FOOD-SOIL—RAPIDITY OF VEGETATION—MONTHS AND DIVISION OF TIME—TAMBO NALANGA—ARMS OF THE FEEJEES—HOUSES—CANOES—TOOLS—POTTERY—DIET—FEASTS—MODE OFSITTING—IDEAS OF GEOGRAPHY—DISTRIBUTION OF TIME—DRESS—TATTOOING—NATIVEIDEAS OF DECENCY —USE OF OIL —COMMERCE—DANGERS ATTENDING NAVIGATION —DEATH OF MRS. CARGILL—WHIPPYS LETTER—EVENTS Given that OUR DEPARTURE. CHAPTER X. FEEJEE GROUP.184 . The Feejee Group is situated between the latitudes of 15° 30 and19° 30 S., and the longitudes of 177° E., and 178° W. It comprisesone hundred and fifty-four islands, sixty-five of which are inhabited.The remaining eighty-nine are sometimes resorted to by the nativesfor the goal of fishing, and taking biche de

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Image from web page 47 of “Our lost explorers : the narrative of the Jeannette Arctic Expedition as related by the survivors, and in the records and final journals of Lieutenant De Extended” (1888)
Lettering Tattoos

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Identifier: ourlostexplorers01newc
Title: Our lost explorers : the narrative of the Jeannette Arctic Expedition as associated by the survivors, and in the records and final journals of Lieutenant De Lengthy
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Newcomb, Raymond Lee
Subjects: De Long, George W. (George Washington), 1844-1881 Jeannette (Ship) Jeannette Expedition (1879-1881)
Publisher: Hartford, Conn., American Pub. Co.

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eutenantWeyprecht, of the Austro-IIungarian Arctic expedition of1872, wrote as follows : — I cannot see any cause for getting a lot more anxious about 38 THE JEANNETTE ARCTIC EXPEDITION. the Jeannette now than on the day when she entered theice. A ship, whose object is discoveries in uninhabited re-gions, can not be anticipated to stay in communication withhome. I know the Jeannette to be properly adapted for Arcticservice, and she is provisioned for three years, — so Mr.DeLong has no reason to linger about the outer ice for thebenefit of these who are expecting news. The absence ofnews, and the failure of the Corwin to receive info,must be contemplated as a symptom of achievement, the Jean-nette getting almost certainly wintered in regions inaccessible totrading ships. With all the sources at his disposition, Mr.DeLong can not be expected to return so early with out hav-ing entirely fulfilled his task, if not compelled by verypressing motives, such as scurvy amongst his crew, or the lossof the ship.

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TATTOOED Woman OF ST. LAWRENCE ISLAND. CHAPTER m. SEAECHES FOR THE JEANNETTE —1881.(second cruise op the cokwin.) As the spring of 1881 drew on without bringing any newsof the Jeannette, it was deemed sensible to carry out someconcerted plan of action for the discovery of the whereaboutsof the ship and her crew. Petitions for government aid andaction have been presented to Congress, and Hon. Charles P.Daly, President of the American Geographical Society, in aneloquent letter to the President of the United States, urgedthe sending out of a search expedition. Subsequently, early in March, Congress authorized theSecretary of the Navy to expend f 175,000 for a suitable shipand its equipments, to be manned wholly by volunteers fromthe navy, and to be sent north to search for the Jeannette.A little later. Secretary Hunt convened at the Navy Depart-ment a board of officers, to whom the duty was intrusted ofsuggesting and advising as to the very best plan for conductingthe government searches for the Jea

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Image from web page 73 of “An account of the manners and customs of the contemporary Egyptians, written in Egypt during the years 1833-1835” (1842)

Friday, August 29th, 2014

Some cool Bear Tattoos pictures:

Image from web page 73 of “An account of the manners and customs of the modern Egyptians, written in Egypt throughout the years 1833-1835” (1842)
Bear Tattoos

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Identifier: accountofmanners00laneuoft
Title: An account of the manners and customs of the modern Egyptians, written in Egypt in the course of the years 1833-1835
Year: 1842 (1840s)
Authors: Lane, Edward William, 1801-1876
Subjects: Egypt — Social life and customs Egypt — History 19th century
Publisher: London, Ward, Lock and co.

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A TATTOOED GIRL. % m WW II ( srECIMKNS OF TATTOOING ON THE CHIN.

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TATTOOED HANDS AND FOOT. formed at the age of about five or six years, and by gipsy-girls.Tiie term applied to it is dakk. Most of the females of the DJ?ESS. 35 greater components of Upper Egypt, who are of a extremely crark complexion,tattoo their lips instead of the parts above-talked about ] therefore con-verting their organic colour to a dull, bluish hue, which, to theeye of a stranger, is really displeasing.^ An additional characteristic of the Egyptian girls that need to behere described is their upright carriage and gait. This is mostremarkable in the female peasantry, owing, doubtless, in a greatmeasure, to their habit of bearing a heavy earthen water-vessel,and other burthens, upon the head. The dress of the ladies of the middle and greater orders ishandsome and sophisticated. Their shirt is extremely complete, like that of themen—but rather shorter—reaching not quite to the knees : it isalso, typically, of the very same kind of material as the mens shirt, or ofcoloured crape—sometimes black, A pair of extremely wide t

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Image from page 674 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants being a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the fantastic continents and principal islands” (1888)
Bear Tattoos

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Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a well-liked account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the fantastic continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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length of theavenue. In the centre is a platform, of tampedclay, with a heavy tree-trunk sunk into it, and in thebeen scooped out a number of troughs, so that severalpound grain at once. The homes are separated into two or a lot more apartments and on account of the compact nature of the clay and tampedfloor are simply kept clean. The roofs are shiny with the reek ofsmoke, as even though they had been painted with coal-tar. The householdchattels or furnishings are restricted to meals-baskets, earthenware pots, anassortment of wicker-operate dishes, the loved ones shield, spears, knives,swords, and tools, and the fish-baskets lying outside. They are tolerablyhospitable, and permit strangers the free of charge use of their dwellings. Thebananas and plantains are very luxuriant, whilst the Guinea palms supplythe individuals with oil and wine the forests give them fuel, the rivers fish,and the gardens cassava, ground-nuts, and Indian corn. The chiefsenact strict laws, and although possessed of but small actual power, either

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MANYEMA GIRL. wood havewomen could 662 THE INHABITANTS OF AFRICA. of wealth or retinue, precise the utmost deference, and are exceedinglyceremonious, becoming constantly followed by a drummer, who taps his drumwith masterly talent. At Rubunga, about the most northerly point reached by the Congo,the natives dress their hair in tufts on the back of the head, fastenedNatives of with iron hair-pins. Tattooing is carried to excess, everyRubunga portion of the skin bearing punctured marks, from the roots ofthe hair down to the knees. Their breasts are like hieroglyphic parch-ment charts, marked with raised figures, ledges, squares, circles, wavylines, tuberose knots, rosettes, and each conceivable design and style. No colour-ing substance had been introduced into these incisions and punctures the cuticle had basically been tortured and irritated by the injectionof some irritants or air. Indeed, some of the glossy tubercles, whichcontained air, were as massive as hens eggs. As numerous as six thin ledgesmarked the foreh

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