Posts Tagged ‘1898’

Image from web page 123 of “If Tam O’Shanter’d had a wheel : and other poems and sketches” (1898)

Thursday, April 28th, 2016

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Image from page 123 of “If Tam O’Shanter’d had a wheel : and other poems and sketches” (1898)
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Identifier: iftamoshanterdha00boyl
Title: If Tam O’Shanter’d had a wheel : and other poems and sketches
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: Boylan, Grace Duffie, 1861?-1935
Subjects:
Publisher: New York : E.R. Herrick
Contributing Library: University of Pittsburgh Library Technique
Digitizing Sponsor: Lyrasis Members and Sloan Foundation

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D PLAYED. II7 His gray head dropped still decrease on hisbreast, and more than the dust and grime on his fur-rowed cheeks rolled the slow tears. The music/ continued, but now the air was changed, andbefore the sightless eyeballs of the old man thenotes flashed up and down like balls of fire: Yes, properly rally round the flag, boys,Nicely rally after again, shouting the battlecry of freedom. Again he feels the shock and long, reverberatingroar of battle. Robert, his brother, bears the stars andstripes. He sees them floating now above the blue, on-moving ranks. Huzza! On comes the storm of shot and shell the miniesscream a death song as they pass, and the dense smoketails like a flame-fringed pall. His comrade on the left drops out of sight he washis tciit mate and his lifelong pal no matter. For-ward! He leaps aside to dodge a circling shell a warmspray showers on his cheek and hand—the life-blood ofhis comrade on the right—still, Forward! The lines are Il8 IF TAM OSHANTER D HAD A WHEEL.

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closing, are together now. A troopers sabercuts his brother down, a gray clad armgrasps for the falling flag. There is a shot,a rain of blows, a deadly, hate-filled con-flict, hand to hand, and then a blinding,torturous flash that hides the flag foreverfrom his sight—but it is saved! Yes— Down with the traitorAnd up with the stars! The old man had risen to his feet and stood erectand soldier-like till the band passed by. He was poor,blind and helpless, but now no longer felt forgotten andalone. He settled down again, and quickly the dews ofevening cooled his brow, and gradually, up above, unfurledthe starry banner of the firmament. The boys had broken ranks and hurried totheir area and as one particular young fellow untied thetasseled bugle from his arm he raised it to hislips to sound tattoo— Blow out your lights, you lazy bummers,Blow out your lights and go to bed. The properly-recognized strains rang clear, and as

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Image taken from page 52 of ‘Moko or, Maori Tattooing … With … illustrations, etc’
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Title: &quotMoko or, Maori Tattooing … With … illustrations, and so on&quot
Author: ROBLEY, Horatio Gordon.
Shelfmark: &quotBritish Library HMNTS 10007.m.ten.&quot, &quotBritish Library HMNTS 10008.t.20.&quot
Page: 52
Spot of Publishing: London
Date of Publishing: 1896
Publisher: Chapman &amp Hall
Issuance: monographic
Identifier: 003126230

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Image from web page 31 of “Worcester in the Spanish War getting the stories of businesses A, C, and H, 2d regiment, and organization G, 9th regiment, M.V.M., throughout the war for the liberation of Cuba, May-November, 1898, with a roster of E. R. Shumway Camp, no. 30,

Wednesday, November 19th, 2014

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Image from page 31 of “Worcester in the Spanish War becoming the stories of organizations A, C, and H, 2d regiment, and company G, 9th regiment, M.V.M., in the course of the war for the liberation of Cuba, Could-November, 1898, with a roster of E. R. Shumway Camp, no. 30,
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Identifier: worcesterinspani02roea
Title: Worcester in the Spanish War being the stories of companies A, C, and H, 2d regiment, and firm G, 9th regiment, M.V.M., throughout the war for the liberation of Cuba, May possibly-November, 1898, with a roster of E. R. Shumway Camp, no. 30, Spanish War veterans, followed by a short account of the perform of Worcester citizens in aiding the soldiers and their families
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors: Roe, Alfred S. (Alfred Seelye), 1844-1917
Subjects: United States. Army. Massachusetts Infantry Regiment, 2nd (1898) Massachusetts infantry. 9th regiment, Co. G Spanish-American War, 1898 — Regimental histories United States Worcester (Mass.) — History 19th century
Publisher: Worcester, Mass., The author

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Reveille, ist get in touch with. 5.45 Guard mount, ist Roll contact. six.00 get in touch with. ,V45 Breakfast. six.15 .•ssenibly. 4.00 Surgeons get in touch with. 7.00 Retreat. 1st contact. six.00 1st Sergts contact.eight.00 Roll get in touch with, 6.05 Co. inspection. 11.00 Supper. six.15 Dinner. 12.00 M Tattoo, 8.00 Talis. 9.00 One particular of the characteristics of the inspectionwas the novel 1 of considering thefeet of the guys. Some of the t)Id sore-toes of the Civil War would havelooked upcni this as the rankest tyr-anny, but be that as it may possibly the Massa-chusetts two(1 started away with the Johnesley maxim, that cleanliness is nextto Godliness, firmly fixed in thoughts andl)ractice. Ilarefooted. the men wereranged in line, and literally, from head1(1 foot, they had been inspected. Whatwould have occurred to the inifortu-nate whose patterers could not passmuster is unknow-n. for no underpin-ning were identified so untidy as to neces-sitate an (irder to go soak your feet,though a fre(|uent quiz among the boyswas. Are vour feet clean? 2S i iKCF.STF.R IX Till. SIAXISII W A k

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WOfiCeSTER I.EAIX(. LAKEI.AXD. Ihc rations consist of liardtack,canned halted J^eans, ]iiimc roastbeef, and coffee. The lieans weregood, and their onl- faihtiij- was theirscantiness : the roast beef was jjrinieonly I)y name, like the hot mince ]&gtieof the western restaurant, which wasneither hot nor mince. It will be re-membered that, to the indignant guestwho. with .-ippetizing memories of hisearly days, ha&ltl ordered it, and findinghimself confronted with a nondescriptbit of tilled pie crust hail |)rotested, theburly waiter said, ou neiMlnt get sococky, thats just its nauu. Waterfjr drinking anil culinar purposes isdistilled sea-iter, and i little of itgoes a lengthy way. told. it eouhl beused, but warm, it was |)ositiel- nau-seating. In the canteen, on ship-board, there are two oi- tlirei- hundredbottles of l.iger, kept upon ice, andthough lhe are helil at J3 rents each,it does not tike i ])oat-loid of seer:dhundred nu-n :i excellent although to miloadthe complete supply, a

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Image from web page 227 of “History of the Ninth and Tenth Regiments Rhode Island Volunteers, and the Tenth Rhode Island Battery, in the Union Army in 1862” (1892)
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Identifier: historyofninth00spic
Title: History of the Ninth and Tenth Regiments Rhode Island Volunteers, and the Tenth Rhode Island Battery, in the Union Army in 1862
Year: 1892 (1890s)
Authors: Spicer, William Arnold, 1845-1913
Subjects: Rhode Island Infantry. 9th Regiment, 1862 United States. Army. Rhode Island Infantry Regiment, 10th (1862) Rhode Island Artillery. 10th Battery, 1862 United States. Army Rhode Island Infantry Regiment, 9th (1861-1865) United States. Army Rhode Island Infantry Regiment, 10th (1861-1865) United States. Army Rhode Island Artillery ,10th (1861-1865) United States — History Civil War, 1861-1865 Regimental histories
Publisher: Providence, Snow &amp Franham, printers

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cs, to assist the captain out.That he may possibly know to-morrow how best to face about,Or kind a line of battle, ere the rebels knock us out. Battalion drills and lots of factors in time.will interpose,To let us feel that martial life is not coleur de rose,Nor idling all the time away, as most recruits suppose. At dress parade the soldier, if he has a bit of pride,Measures gaily forth, a gallant man, of all the earth espied.And holding in his single hand his countrys welfare wide, Melodiously the bugle is sounding the retreat: The weary work of day is done theres rest for tired feet, The briar woods will ofter quickly the nights supreme treat. Ah I what is like these old-time nights about the llaring blaze?What comrades like the ones we met in yonder vanished days IOld time will keep their memory green and fresh for us usually. But hark 1 that certainly is tattoo, how quick the time has sped!Now hasten each and every soldier true to unroll his little bed,For taps will quickly be beating, and a day in camp be tied.

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RHODE ISLAND VOLUNTEERS. 215 llEADqLARTERS RESERVE ArMY CoRPS, Basic Orders No. j. Washington, June j6, 1862. All commands of the Reserve Army Corps south of the Potomac, not garri-soning fortifications will constitute a Division to consist of two Brigades. The first brigade to be beneath command of Brigadier-General Cooke, and to bestationed at Clouds Mills, Virginia, and will comprise the following commands : Fourteenth United States Infantry, • . . Significant Williams. Seventeenth United States Infantry, … • Nineteenth United States Infantry, … – Initial and Eleventh LTnited States Infantry, . . ■ Sixty-ninth New York Infantry, Sixth New York Cavalry, …. Ninth New York Cavalry, …. Second Pennsylvania Cavalry, Companj L, Sixth United States Cavalry, Detachment Fifth United States Cavalry, Sixteenth New York Battery, The second brigade to be under command of Col. Zenas R. Bliss, Tenth Regiment Rhode Island Volunteers, and to be stationed close to the Fairfax Seminaryand will compr

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Image from page 207 of “Down in Dixie : life in a cavalry regiment in the war days, from the Wilderness to Appomattox” (1893)
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Identifier: downindixielifei00alle
Title: Down in Dixie : life in a cavalry regiment in the war days, from the Wilderness to Appomattox
Year: 1893 (1890s)
Authors: Allen, Stanton P., 1849-1901 Laskey, H. G
Subjects: United States. Army. Massachusetts Cavalry Regiment, 1st (1861-1865) United States — History Civil War, 1861-1865 Private narratives United States — History Civil War, 1861-1865
Publisher: Boston : Lothrop

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. He was on the sick report for 4 orfive days. Paragraph 1,190 of the Revised Regulations for theArmy (1863), fixed the soldiers everyday ration as follows : Twelve ounces of pork or bacon, or 1 pound and 4 ounces of salt orfresh beef 1 ])ound and six ounces of soft bread or flour, or one particular pound of hardbread, or 1 pound and 4 ounces of corn meal and to each one particular hundredrations, fifteen pounds of peas or beans, and ten pounds of rice or hominy tenpounds of green coffee, or eight pounds of roasted (or roasted and ground) coffee,or 1 pound and eight ounces of tea fifteen pounds of sugar 4 quarts ofvinegar one pound and four ounces of adamantine or star candles 4 poundsof soap 3 pounds and twelve ounces of salt 4 ounces of pepper thirtypounds of potatoes, when practicable, arid 1 quart of molasses. I have quoted the precise language of the regulationsfor the data of civilians who every single now and theninquire of the veterans: What did the Government

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SOAP IN MY soup! HE EXCLAIMED. fTHE NEW YORK I TUBUC LI-BRAKYi A8T0R, LtHCXTILDEN FOUNDATIONS^^ DOWN IN DIXIE. 199 feed you fellows on down in Dixie? Challenging-tack, saltpork and coffee had been the soldiers mainstay. Thesweetest meal I ever ate consisted of crumbs of tough-tack picked up out of the dirt, exactly where the boxes hadbeen opened to issue crackers to the troops, and a pieceof salt pork that had been thrown away by an infantrysoldier. I still cherish the memory of that feast. There had been two or three violinists in our battalion,and the boys occasionally induced these musicians tofiddle for a stag dance, as they named the old-fashionedquadrille in which troopers with their caps off wentthrough ladies chain and other figures prescribed forthe fair partners in the regulation dance. The dancestook location by the light of the camp fires amongst re-treat and tattoo. The boys managed to get a excellent dealof enjoyment out of these gatherings. In the course of the war a fantastic several men created fortunesby selling excellent

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Image from page 255 of “Familiar life in field and forest the animals, birds, frogs, and salamanders” (1898)

Sunday, October 12th, 2014

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Image from web page 255 of “Familiar life in field and forest the animals, birds, frogs, and salamanders” (1898)
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Identifier: familiarlifeinfi00math
Title: Familiar life in field and forest the animals, birds, frogs, and salamanders
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: Mathews, F. Schuyler (Ferdinand Schuyler), 1854-1938 Underwood, William Lyman, phot
Subjects: Zoology
Publisher: New York, D. Appleton and business

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s is drastically overbalancedmice and in-stroys. by the quantity ofsects which he de-His depredationsare consequently insignifi-cant compared withthe havoc he makesamong the houses ofcreatures injurious tothe farm. Beetles, mice,and even rats, he hunts withceaseless activity throughout all hoursof the evening, and it is not possible toestimate the extent of his services in thisdirection. But he is omnivorous, like the bear he feeds on mice, rats, moles, turtles, toads, frogs, fish, insects, nuts, fruit,* corn, birds and their eggs, and often poultry. He is abroad at all hours of the night, and frequently on cloudy days. There is no question about the abundance of life * Dr. Abbott tells of a coon he when saw in a tree whose monthwas apparently reeking with gore, but upon a closer view of theanimal and his environment he found that he had been indulginghis taste for wild grapes. The tree was draped with the vines,and the coon had liberally helped himself to the ripe fruit, whichhad stained his jaws red.

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TheRaccoon 204 FAMILIAR LIFE IN FIELD AND FOREST. in the woods and fields there are evidences of it inevery path when we are strolling via thecountry highways and byways. It only needs awatchful eye to discern the unmistakable traces ofcreatures, both excellent and tiny, at our feet, withinreach of our hands, and more than our heads. I do notallude now to the ubiquitous toad, the occasionalsnake, the familiar squirrel, and the nevertheless a lot more famil-iar sparrow : these are often in proof. But thewoodchucks hole is not far off, if we will look for itthe salamanders tracks are traced in the sand aroundevery other stone on the margin of the brook, themarks of the porcupines teeth are on the corner ofthe woodshed, the tattooing of the sap sucker deco-rates the trunk of the apple tree, the wTeasels property isunder the decaying log, the fox leaves feathers andbony relics at the threshold of his burrow, the raccoonleaves his footprints in the muddy margin of thepond, the turtle trails a curiou

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Image from web page 386 of “America’s war for humanity, related in story and picture, embracing a comprehensive history of Cuba’s struggle for liberty…” (1898)

Friday, September 26th, 2014

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Image from page 386 of “America’s war for humanity, associated in story and picture, embracing a full history of Cuba’s struggle for liberty…” (1898)
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Identifier: americaswarforhu00inga
Title: America’s war for humanity, associated in story and picture, embracing a total history of Cuba’s struggle for liberty…
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: Ingalls, John James, 1833-1900
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, Thompson

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ch gun turret. Lieutenant Potts with the stadimeter told off the distance to lyieutenantSears, and when 7500 yards was announced, the Cristobal Colon^s stem andthe bow of the partly dismantled Reina Mercedes showed in the harbor. You can fire now, stated the Commodore to the semi-stripped Captain,who stood unconcernedly in the open of the wonderful turret, and then the Com-modore stepped off the turret to avoid concussion. Let her go. Lieutenant, was heard from the turret and then therewas a frightful roar, and an immense half-ton projectile, propelled by theexplosion of 5 hundred pounds of powder, went flying toward the mark.For three seconds it flew along its trajectory, and when it dropped therearose a fountain of water, which, for a minute, hid the Colon from sight,even though a ringing cheer went up from the jackies on deck. A tiny brief there. Attempt your other a little larger up, mentioned the Com-modore and elevating it to 8000 yards, the second large gun hurled a projectiletoward the enemy-

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384 AMERICA-S WAR FOR HUMANITY. A fair hit! cried the males, as the shell crashed into the stem of theReina Mercedes and exploded. The two soon after-guns then spoke and soon after this the entrance of theharbor of Santiago de Cuba was closed out of vision from on board thebattleship. By this time the cruiser Neiv Orleans had come in variety, and the fortswere opening a steady fire from what evidently have been higher-power modern guns. The shells dropped thick and quick over or quick of the Massachusetts^and the American blue jackets jeered and laughed at the undesirable aim of the Span-iards. One extremely well-place shot went close via the upper works of theMassachusetts., but it did not hit something, and simply produced a splashing inthe water upon the other side of the battleship. Well, the Dagoes are acquiring a little greater, stated a sailor. The remarkcaused an additional waggish blue jacket to say, Oh, give them a year, and theylllearn to shoot. The extended rifles of the Neiv Orleans were by this time playinga tattoo on the

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Image from page 123 of “If Tam O’Shanter’d had a wheel, and other poems and sketches” (1898)
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Identifier: iftamoshanterdh00boyl
Title: If Tam O’Shanter’d had a wheel, and other poems and sketches
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: Boylan, Grace Duffie, 1861?-1935
Subjects:
Publisher: New York, E. R. Herrick &amp co

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His gray head dropped nevertheless reduce on hisbreast, and over the dust and grime on his fur-rowed cheeks rolled the slow tears. The music» continued, but now the air was changed, andbefore the sightless eyeballs of the old man thef notes flashed up and down like balls of fire: Yes, nicely rally round the flag, boys,Nicely rally as soon as again, shouting the battlecry of freedom. Again he feels the shock and long, reverberatingroar of battle. Robert, his brother, bears the stars andstripes. He sees them floating now above the blue, on-moving ranks. Huzza! On comes the storm of shot and shell the miniesscream a death song as they pass, and the dense smokeiaiis like a flame-fringed pall. His comrade on the left drops out of sight he washis teiit mate and his lifelong friend no matter. For-ward ! He leaps aside to dodge a circling shell a warmspray showers on his cheek and hand—the life-blood ofhis comrade on the right—still, Forward! The lines are Il8 IF TAM OSHANTER *D HAD A WHEEL.

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closing, are with each other now. A troopers sabercuts his brother down, a gray clad armgrasps for the falling flag. There is a shot,a rain of blows, a deadly, hate-filled con-flict, hand to hand, and then a blinding,J^ torturous flash that hides the flag foreverW from his sight—but it is saved! Yes— Down with the traitorAnd up with the stars I The old man had risen to his feet and stood erectand soldier-like until the band passed by. He was poor,blind and helpless, but now no longer felt forgotten andalone. He settled down again, and quickly the dews ofevening cooled his brow, and gradually, up above, unfurledthe starry banner of the firmament. The boys had broken ranks and hurried totheir room and as one young fellow untied thetasseled bugle from his arm he raised it to hislips to sound tattoo— Blow out your lights, you lazy bummers,Blow out your lights and go to bed. The well-recognized strains rang clear, and as

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Image from page 210 of “Schley and Santiago an historical account of the blockade and final destruction of the Spanish fleet beneath command of Admiral Pasquale Cervera, July 3, 1898” (1902)

Sunday, September 7th, 2014

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Image from page 210 of “Schley and Santiago an historical account of the blockade and final destruction of the Spanish fleet beneath command of Admiral Pasquale Cervera, July 3, 1898” (1902)
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Identifier: cu31924020422121
Title: Schley and Santiago an historical account of the blockade and final destruction of the Spanish fleet under command of Admiral Pasquale Cervera, July three, 1898
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Graham, George Edward, 1866- Schley, Winfield Scott, 1839-1911
Subjects: Santiago, Battle of, Santiago de Cuba, Cuba, 1898 Spanish-American War, 1898
Publisher: Chicago, W. B. Conkey firm

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rn of the Reina Mercedesand exploded. The two right after-guns then spoke, and thenthe entrance of the harbor of Santiago de Cubawas shut out of vision from the battleship. By this time the little cruiser New Orleanshad come in range, and the forts had been openinga steady fire from what had been evidently higher-energy modern guns. The shells dropped thickand quickly over or quick of the Massachusetts,and the American blue-jackets jeered andlaughed at the negative aim of the Spaniards. Onevery nicely-put shot went close, through theupperworks of the Massachusetts, but it did nothit anything and just created a splashing inthe water upon the other side of the battleship. Properly, the dagoes are receiving a little bet-ter, mentioned a sailor. The remark triggered one more waggish blue-jacket to say: Oh, give them a year and they will learnto shoot. The extended rifles of the New Orleans were bythis time playing a tattoo on the low-lying fortsnear the entrance, so as to draw their fire andascertain their range, and the Iowas biggest

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&lt^smgm, Copyright, iy02, by V . B. Conkey Firm. T/iey are all out and coming to the west(xvii) AND SANTIAGO lyy twelve-inch guns had been hurling steel projectilesinto the harbor entrance. The forts kept up a best cannonade andsome of their shots have been effectively aimed, so far asthe variety was concerned, but they were noteffective. The Cristobal Colon opened fire with her bigguns, but her shells in no way once came near theline. Soon after operating a mile to the eastward theMassachusetts, followed by the other Americanwarships, circled about and ran back more than verynearly the exact same course, steaming west bysouth. On receiving near the exact same range atwhich the firing opened before, the warshipsfired with their starboard batteries, and afterdelivering a single round drew out of the Span-iards variety, Commodore Schley saying as hestepped to the quarter-deck: Effectively, we let them know that we have someammunition, and I know their capacity fordefense. For half an hour following the ships had passed a mile out of the rang

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Image from web page 88 of “The landing-force and little-arm directions, United States Navy, 1905” (1905)
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Identifier: landingforcesmal00unit
Title: The landing-force and small-arm instructions, United States Navy, 1905
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors: United States. Bureau of Naval Personnel Fullam, William F. (William Freeland), 1855-1926 United States Naval Institute
Subjects: United States. Navy United States. Navy United States. Navy
Publisher: Annapolis, Md., Naval Institute

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rning, guard-mounting need to adhere to morning parade. (six) Fatigue is the signal for policing camp or quarters, and forworking-parties to commence perform. (7) Drill-get in touch with is usually sounded after the morning fatigue du-ties have been performed, or following dinner. (eight) Assembly, signal to type by organizations. (9) Recall from drill is the signal for drill to cease. (ten) Dinner-contact, usually at noon. (11) Retreat at sunset, when the troops should appear underarms, climate permitting orders and detail for the following dayare published then. (12) Supper-call normally follows parade. (13) Tattoo not earlier than 9 nor later than ten.30 p. m. (14) Taps from fifteen to thirty minutes following tattoo. (15) To Arms is the signal of alarm. The command shouldturn out beneath arms. (16) The basic is the signal to break camp and prepare tomarch. Camping, Bivouacs, Cantonments.BIVOUACS. 87 23. (1) In fine climate the bivouac is far more healthy than thecamp, especially if operating in a wooded country where fires

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Plate two.Rubber-blanket Art. 23.as a shelter-tent. can be maintained very easily. (Plates2 and three.) (two) In picking a internet site for abivouac, wood and water are thegreat requisites a good supplyof the former is all the moreessential if the nights are cold. (three) The fires need to be soconstructed as not to be seenfrom the distance, to be quicklyextinguished, to admit of manygathering around them, and atthe very same time to economize fuel.As a rule, if warmth is desired,see that the fire is kept close tothe ground if light is wanted,elevate it iy2 or 2 feet above theground. CANTONMENTS. 24. (1) Cantonments are theinhabited areas which troopsoccupy for shelter when not putinto barracks. (two) The bg. c. indicates theplace where the command shallassemble in case of alarm. It uJ-fi fTQOO yards. I I I I • © © f® &gt 4i 4t 4« h four* A A* A i qo * ® 1 Plate 3. Art. 23Bivouac.a a a a Double sentries, b b, Choose-ets, c, Assistance of outpost, d, Mainbody, e, Kitchens, f, Business offi-cers, g,

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Image from web page 126 of “Birds of Washington and vicinity, which includes adjacent components of Maryland and Virginia” (1898)

Saturday, September 6th, 2014

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Image from page 126 of “Birds of Washington and vicinity, which includes adjacent components of Maryland and Virginia” (1898)
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Identifier: birdsofwashingto00mayn
Title: Birds of Washington and vicinity, including adjacent parts of Maryland and Virginia
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: Maynard, Lucy Warner, 1852-1936
Subjects: Birds — Washington (D.C.)
Publisher: Washington, D. C.

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r lawns and gardens. Inspring he is a persistent drummer, and beats his roll-ing tattoo on a dead limb or a tin roof with equalenergy and satisfaction to himself. He frequentlycalls out peck, peck, and offers apart from a harsh trillwhich he most likely intends for a song. When nestingbegins he is significantly a lot more sedate and we hear only aquiet tap, tap, tapping on the trees as he goes aboutin search of food. He is a sociable fellow, and inautumn typically joins the cheery group of Chickadees,Tufted Tits, and Nuthatches which roam our woodsthrough the winter. Mr. Chapman asks, Who canestimate the massive numbers of insects eggs andlarvae which these patient explorers of twig and trunkdestroy? Hairy ^A^oodpecker: Dryobates villosiis. The Hairy Woodpecker is hke the Downy exceptthat the outer tail-feathers are not barred with black,and he is significantly larger, getting nearly ten inches extended.He seldom nests right here, but is not uncommon in springand autumn and is occasionally discovered in winter. RED-HEADED WOODPECKER. 123

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RED-HEADED WOODPECKER. Red-headed Woodpecker: Mdanerpcs crytJiroceph- aliis.Length 9^2 inches. Head, neck and upper breast crimson-red.Upper back, wings and tail bkiish-black.Reduce back, beneath components, and a broad stripe across thewings, white. Young, gray where aduUs are red. An uncommon summer season and uncommon winter resident. In Birds in the Bnsh, Bradford Torrey writes ofthe Red-headed Woodpecker: This showy bird has 124 RED-HE A DED WO ODPE CKER. for a very good numerous years been quite uncommon in Massachu-setts and as a result when, throughout the freshness of myornithological researches, I went to Washington for amonths pay a visit to, it was one particular of the things which I hadespecially in thoughts, to make his acquaintance. But Ilooked for him without accomplishment till, at the end of a fort-evening, I created a pilgrimage to Mount A^ernon. Right here,soon after going to the grave and going over the residence, asevery visitor does, I sauntered about the grounds,pondering of the fantastic man who utilized to do the identical somany years ahead of, but all the whi

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Image from web page 374 of “Birds that hunt and are hunted : life histories of 1 hundred and seventy birds of prey, game birds and water-fowls” (1902)
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Identifier: birdsthathuntare00bla
Title: Birds that hunt and are hunted : life histories of one particular hundred and seventy birds of prey, game birds and water-fowls
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Blanchan, Neltje, 1865-1918
Subjects: Birds
Publisher: New York : Doubleday, Page &amp Co.

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s head,distends the sacs on either side of his neck that look like orangesfastened there, ruffles up his feathers to seem twice his naturalsize, erects and spreads his tail, droops his wings, and, rushingacross the arena, takes the floor. Now the ball is opened in-deed. Out rush other dancers, stamping the ground hard astheir feet beat a swift tattoo the air escaping from their brightsacs producing a sort of bubbling crow, fairly diverse from thedeep organ tone of the pinnated grouse the rustling of thevibrating wings and tail furnishing extra music. Now all joinin at initial there is dignified decorum, but the enjoyable grows fastand furious, then nevertheless ftister and nevertheless much more furious the crazybirds twist and twirl, stamp and leap over every other in theirfrenzy, every moment generating more noise, till their energyfinally spent, they calm down into sane creatures once more. Theymove quietly about more than the effectively worn space (a chickensstamping ground, measuring from fifty to a single hundred feet 282

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»4

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Image from page 64 of “Bird-life a guide to the study of our widespread birds” (1898)

Friday, August 15th, 2014

A handful of nice Wings Tattoos images I found:

Image from page 64 of “Bird-life a guide to the study of our common birds” (1898)
Wings Tattoos

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Identifier: birdlifeguide00chap
Title: Bird-life a guide to the study of our widespread birds
Year: 1898 (1890s)
Authors: Chapman, Frank M. (Frank Michler), 1864-1945 Seton, Ernest Thompson, 1860-1946
Subjects: Birds — United States
Publisher: New York, D. Appleton and company

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rds of their use for other importantservices, and consequently we have a biped which, so faras their assistance goes, is without having arms or hands. As aresult, the duties which would naturally fall to thesemembers are performed by the bill, whose chief workplace,as a result, is that of a hand. Sometimes it is sexually adorned, as in the Puffins,many Auks, Ducks, and the White Pelicans, which,throughout the nesting season, have some special plate, knob,or color on the bill. With the Woodpeckers it is amusical instrument—the drumstick with which they beata tattoo on some resounding limb. Owls and some otherbirds, when angry or frightened, snap their mandiblestogether like castanets. But it is as a hand that thebill provides greatest evidence of adaptation to or by habit.Amongst families in which the wings, tail, and feet areessentially alike in type, the bill may possibly present fantastic vari-ation—proof apparently of its response to the demandsmade upon it. All birds use it as a comb and brush ^vith which to

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Plate IX. Page 97. WILSONS SNIPE.Length, 11-25 inches. Upper parts black, buff, and rusty throat and bellywhite, rest of below parts black and buflf. Kind AXD HABIT: THE BILL. 31 le perform their toilet, and, pressing a drop of oil from tlgland at the root of the tail, they dress their featherswith their bill. Parrots use the bill in chmbing, andits hawklike shape in these birds is an mmsnal instanceof similarity in stnicture accompanying various habits. Birds which do not strike with their feet may usethe bill as a weapon, but the manner in which it is em-ployed corresponds so closely with the technique by whicha bird secures its food, that as a weapon the bill pre-sents no specific modifications. In constructing the nestthe bill may be employed as a trowel, an auger, a needle, achisel, and as many other tools. But as a hand the bills most crucial office is thatof procuring meals and superb indeed are the formsit assumes to provide the appetites of birds who mayrequire a drop of ne

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned page photos that might have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and look of these illustrations might not completely resemble the original work.

Image from page 84 of “Bird-life: a guide to the study of our typical birds” (1900)
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Identifier: cu31924000101992
Title: Bird-life: a guide to the study of our widespread birds
Year: 1900 (1900s)
Authors: Chapman, Frank M. (Frank Michler), 1864-1945 Seton, Ernest Thompson, 1860-1946
Subjects: Birds Birds
Publisher: New York, D. Appleton

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their use for other importantservices, and consequently we have a biped which, so fariis their help goes, is without having arms or hands. As aresult, the duties which ivould naturally fall to thesemembers are performed by the bill, whose chief workplace,therefore, is that of a hand. Sometimes it is sexually adorned, as in the Puffins,a number of Auks, Ducks, and the White Pelicans, which,for the duration of the nesting season, have some particular plate, knob,or color on the bill. With the Woodpeckers it is amusical instrument—the drumstick with which they beata tattoo on some resounding limb. Owls and some otherbirds, when angry or frightened, snap their mandiblestogether like castanets. But it is as a hand that thebill provides very best evidence of adaptation to or by habit.Amongst families in which the wings, tail, and feet areessentially alike in type, the bill may possibly present wonderful vari-ation—proof apparently of its response to the denaandsmade upon it. All birds use it as a comb and brush with which to ,L,

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Plate IX. Page 97. WILSONS SNIPE.Length, 11-25 inches. Upper components black, buff, and rusty throat and bellywhite, rest of below components black and buff. Type AND HABIT: THE BILL. 31 perform their toilet, and, pressing a drop of oil from thegland at the root of the tail, they dress their featherswith their bill. Parrots use the bill in climbing, andits hawklike shape in these birds is an uncommon instanceof similarity in structure accompanying distinct habits. Birds which do not strike with their feet may possibly usethe bill as a weapon, but the manner in which it is em-ployed corresponds so closely with the strategy by whicha bird secures its meals, that as a weapon the bill pre-sents no unique modifications. In constructing the nestthe bill could be utilized as a trowel, an auger, a needle, achisel, and as a number of other tools. But as a hand the bills most critical workplace is thatof procuring meals and superb certainly are the formsit assumes to provide the appetites of birds who mayrequire a drop of nec

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Please note that these pictures are extracted from scanned web page images that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and look of these illustrations could not perfectly resemble the original operate.

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