Posts Tagged ‘1912’

Image from page 565 of “The pagan tribes of Borneo a description of their physical, moral and intellectual condition, with some discussion of their ethnic relations” (1912)

Sunday, February 8th, 2015

Some cool Dog Tattoos images:

Image from page 565 of “The pagan tribes of Borneo a description of their physical, moral and intellectual condition, with some discussion of their ethnic relations” (1912)
Dog Tattoos

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Identifier: pagantribesofbor01hose
Title: The pagan tribes of Borneo a description of their physical, moral and intellectual situation, with some discussion of their ethnic relations
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Hose, Charles, 1863-1929 McDougall, William, 1871-1938 Haddon, Alfred C. (Alfred Cort), 1855-1940
Subjects: Ethnology Anthropometry
Publisher: London : Macmillan and co., limited
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Net Archive

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ous modification ofthis eye is observed in one more Sea Dayak scorpion designfigured by E. B. Haddon [four, Fig. 19]. Furness [3, p. 142]figures a couple of scorpion styles, but neither are quiteas debased as that which we figure right here. Furness alsofigures a scroll design and style, not unlike a Bakatan design and style, tatuedon the forearm, and termed taia gasieng^ the thread of thespinning wheel a related one figured by Ling Roth [7, 1 Mr. E. B. Haddon (four, p. 124) writes : * The tattoo design utilised by theKayans and Kenyahs . . . has been copied and adopted by the Ibans in thesame way as the Kalamantans have done, the primary distinction becoming, thatthe Ibans get in touch with the design and style a scorpion. For this reason the pattern tends tobecome a lot more and a lot more like the scorpion. … The italics are ours. Isnot this placing the cart prior to the horse? It is only when the designresembles a scorpion that the term scorpion is applied to it all other modifi-cations, even even though tending towards the scorpion, are called dog, prawn, orcrab.

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276 PAGAN TRIBES OF BORNEO chap. p. 88] is termed trong, the ^%% plant. On the breast andshoulders some types of rosette or star design and style are tatued inconsiderable profusion they are recognized variously asbunga trough the ^%% plant flower, tandan buahy bunchesof fruit, lukut, an antique bead, and ringgit salilang. Afour-pointed star, such as that shown in Fig. 64, is termedbuah andu^ fruit of Plukenetia corniculata since this fruitis quadrate in shape with pointed angles, it is evident thatthe name has been applied to the pattern because of itsresemblance to the fruit. Furness figures examples ofthese styles and also Ling Roth [7, p. 88]. We figure(Figs. 75, ^six, yy) 3 styles for thethroat recognized often as katak^ frogs,occasionally as tali gasieng, thread of thespinning wheel, and no doubt other mean-ingless names are applied to them. Twoof the figures (Figs. 75, yy) are evidentlymodifications of the Bakatan gerowitdesign, but here they are representedwith the tatu pigment, while wi

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Image from web page 20 of “The Goblin November 1922” (1922)
Dog Tattoos

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Identifier: goblinv3n5toro
Title: The Goblin November 1922
Year: 1922 (1920s)
Authors:
Subjects: Canadian wit and humor Canadian poetry Canadian prose literature
Publisher: Toronto : Goblin
Contributing Library: University of Toronto Archives &amp Records Management Services
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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s. But the managing ed. Still racked his head, News, news, we want real news. Up came a yarn Of a big legal suit For a northern pulp mill And a million to boot. Mentioned the managing ed. The publics fed With this sort of point. We have to have news. Ho! a photographer, Breathless but satisfied. Came in with a picture Cried, Heres anything snappy. The managing ed. Raised up his head, News, news, have you got news? Yep, mentioned the other, This girl, its a fac, Has had Einsteins Theory Tattooed on her back. The managing ed. Stood on his head, News! news! Hurray, real news! A Botanical Song Rosae damascenae are redViolae cucullalae are blue,Lilia speciosa are white,Rosemary Menkelberg, I enjoy you. G—G—G Do Tell Model Essay for a Toronto Freshman in Arts. Who I am and why I came to college. I am Percival Aloysius Nobbs III, and I came tocollege since my father, P. Aloysius Nobbs II, whocame to college due to the fact his father P. Aloysius Nobbscame to college, came to college. —D. M. Halllday. G—G-G

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My dog knows as much as I do.What a blessing hes muzzled.

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Image from page 102 of “Reminiscences of the South seas” (1912)

Tuesday, February 3rd, 2015

A handful of good Sun Tattoos pictures I found:

Image from web page 102 of “Reminiscences of the South seas” (1912)
Sun Tattoos

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Identifier: reminiscencesofs00lafa
Title: Reminiscences of the South seas
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: La Farge, John, 1835-1910
Subjects: Hawaii — Description and travel Samoan Islands — Description and travel Tahiti — Description and travel Fiji — Description and travel
Publisher: Garden City, N.Y., Doubleday, Web page &amp Firm
Contributing Library: New York Public Library
Digitizing Sponsor: MSN

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ad carried with us below the equator, when theshape of the httle cutter that was to take us showed betweenthe outstanding rocks of the coast of Tutuila. As the bigsteamer slowed up, a handful of native boats came out to meet it,manned with guys paddling and singing in concert, some ofthem crowned with leaves, and wearing garlands about theirnecks, their naked bodies and arms making an indescribablered colour against the blue of the sea, which was as deep underthis cloudy sky, but not so brilhant as below yesterdays sun.They came on board, some plunging proper into the sea on theirway to the companion ladder, bringing fruit and curiositiesfor sale. But our time had come and we could only give aglance at the splendid nakedness of the savages adorned byfine tattooing that looked like silk, and with waist drapery ofbrilliant patterns. We dropped into the dancing boat thatwaited for us and scrambled into the small cutter or schoonersome thirty feet lengthy, not really skilfully managed, that was to 68

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Image from web page 76 of “Stories of the Hudson” (1912)

Wednesday, November 26th, 2014

Some cool Wizard Tattoos images:

Image from page 76 of “Stories of the Hudson” (1912)
Wizard Tattoos

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Identifier: storiesofhudson00irvirich
Title: Stories of the Hudson
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Irving, Washington, 1783-1859
Subjects: Hudson River (N.Y. and N.J.)
Publisher: New York, Dodge publishing firm

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ng proclaiming his method, or perked inquisitivelyinto his face as if to get a understanding of his physiognomy. The woodpecker tapped a tattoo on the hollow appletree, and then peered round the trunk, as if asking howhe relished the salutation while the squirrel scamperedalong the fence, whisking his tail more than his head by wayof a huzza. Right here reigned the golden imply extolled by poets, inwhich no gold was to be identified and quite tiny silver.The inhabitants of the Hollow have been of the primitivestock, and had intermarried and bred in and in, fromthe earliest time of the province, in no way swarming farfrom the parent hive, but dividing and subdividingtheir paternal acres as they swarmed. Right here had been little farms, each getting its little portionof meadow and cornfield its orchard of gnarled an4sprawling apple trees its garden, in which the rose,)the marigold, and hollyhock, grew sociably with thecabbage, the pea, and the pumpkin each had its low-eaved mansion redundant with white-headed young children

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In Sleepy HoUozv ChurchyardNear the summit of the hill, beneath the trees, is Irving s grave Wolferts Roost 45 with an old hat nailed against the wall for the house-keeping wren the coop on the grassplot, where themotherly hen clucked round with her vagrant brood:each had its stone well, with a moss-covered bucketsuspended to the long balancing-pole, according toantediluvian hydraulics although within doors resoundedthe eternal hum of the spinning wheel. Several had been the wonderful historical facts which the worthyDiedrich collected in these lowly mansions, and pa-tiently would he sit by the old Dutch housewives witha child on his knee, or a purring grimalkin on his lap,listing to endless ghost stories spun forth to the hum-ming accompaniment of the wheel. The delighted historian pursued his explorations farinto the foldings of the hills exactly where the Pocantico windsits wizard stream amongst the mazes of its old Indianhaunts at times operating darkly in pieces of wood-land beneath balancing sprays of

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Image from web page 212 of “Expeditions organized or participated in by the Smithsonian Institution..” (1912)

Sunday, September 7th, 2014

Check out these Wings Tattoos photos:

Image from page 212 of “Expeditions organized or participated in by the Smithsonian Institution..” (1912)
Wings Tattoos

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Identifier: expeditionsorgan191013191516smit
Title: Expeditions organized or participated in by the Smithsonian Institution..
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Smithsonian Institution
Subjects: Scientific expeditions
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : Smithsonian Institution

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there have been but few who had been entitled to have the ceremony per-formed, l)ecause war honors had been not very easily won and few werewealthy adequate to aiTord the expense of the ceremonies. When,for the duration of the final century, wars among the various tribes ceased, thereal significance of the rite vanished, but the superstitious belief thatthe symbolic figures meant long life to the person so tattooed, re-mained prominently in the minds of the folks. About the time that the appropriate of the honored warrior to the exclu-sive use of the Tattooing Ceremonies came to an end, a new condi-tion arose which materially changed the character of the rite. Fromthe sales of lands to the United States the Osage tribe acquired awealth by which a greater quantity of its members have been enabled to NO. 8 SMITHSONIAN EXPLORATIONS, I913 67 have performed the tattooing, as well as other ceremonies. It wasthen that this ancient rite became the means by which any individualcould publicly show his affection toward a relative.

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Fig 64.—An Osage Indian with tattouing. Figure 64 shows designs tattooed u])on the l)ody of a man. Thoseon a lady are much more elaborate and cover the upper part of herbody, breast and back, and the reduced component of her legs. Figure 65 shows 68 SMITHSONTAX M ISCELI.ANEOrS COLLECTIONS VOL. 63 three implements used in tattooing. Every of these is created ofwood aljout the length of a pencil. To the reduced finish are attachedneedles arranged in a straight row, and to the upper finish are fastenedfour small rattles produced of the large wing (|uills of the |)elican. This

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Image from web page 118 of “Bird-life: a guide to the study of our typical birds” (1901)
Wings Tattoos

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Identifier: cu31924022527000
Title: Bird-life: a guide to the study of our typical birds
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors: Chapman, Frank M. (Frank Michler), 1864-1945 Seton, Ernest Thompson, 1860-1946
Subjects: Birds Birds
Publisher: New York, D. Appleton

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th it he woos his mate andgives voice to the joyousness of nesting time. In someinstances vocal music might be replaced by instrumental,as in the case of the drumming wing-beat of the Grouse,or the bill-tattoo of the Woodpeckers, each of which areanalogous to song. The season of song corresponds far more or much less closelywith the mating season, though some species begin tosing long before their courting days are near. Othersmay sing to some extent throughout the year, but thereal song period is in the spring. Many birds have a second song period immediatelyafter the completion of their postbreeding molt, but itusually lasts only for a few dajs, and is in no sense com-parable to the true season of song. This is heralded bythe Song Sparrow, whose sweet chant, late in February, * See Witchell, The Evolution of Bird Song (Macmlllan Co.).Bioknell, A Study of the Singing of Our Birds The Axik (New Yorkcity), vol. i, 1884, pp. 60-71, 136-140, 209-318, 333-332 vol. ii, 1885,pp. 144-154, 349-363. 63

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Web page 110. Plate XX. SCKEECH OWL. Length, 9-40 inches. Upper parts gray, or bright reddish brown, andblacli beneath parts white, gray, or vibrant reddish brown, and blaclieyes yellow. VOICE OP BIRDS. 63 is a most welcome promise of spring. Then stick to theEobins, Blackbirds, and other migrants, until, late inMay, the wonderful springtime chorus is at its height. The Bobolink is the 1st bird to desert the choir.We do not often hear him soon after July 5. Quickly he is fol-lowed by the Veery, and each day now shows some freshvacancy in the ranks of the feathered singers, till byAugust 5 we have left only the Wood Pewee, IndigoBunting, and Eed-eyed Vireo—tireless songsters whofear neither midsummer nor midday heat. Get in touch with-Notes.—The call-notes of birds are even moreworthy of our consideration than are their songs. Song isthe outburst of a particular emotion get in touch with-notes form thelanguage of every single day. Numerous of us are familiar withbirds songs, but who knows their every call-note andwho can tell us what every

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Image from page 213 of “Expeditions organized or participated in by the Smithsonian Institution..” (1912)

Friday, August 15th, 2014

Some cool Reduce back Tattoos photos:

Image from web page 213 of “Expeditions organized or participated in by the Smithsonian Institution..” (1912)
Lower back Tattoos

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Identifier: expeditionsorgan191013191516smit
Title: Expeditions organized or participated in by the Smithsonian Institution..
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Smithsonian Institution
Subjects: Scientific expeditions
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : Smithsonian Institution

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Fig 64.—An Osage Indian with tattouing. Figure 64 shows designs tattooed u])on the l)ody of a man. Thoseon a woman are a lot more elaborate and cover the upper portion of herbody, breast and back, and the decrease portion of her legs. Figure 65 shows 68 SMITHSONTAX M ISCELI.ANEOrS COLLECTIONS VOL. 63 3 implements utilized in tattooing. Each of these is produced ofwood aljout the length of a pencil. To the lower finish are attachedneedles arranged in a straight row, and to the upper finish are fastenedfour tiny rattles created of the massive wing (|uills of the |)elican. This

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Fig. 65.—Three implements utilised inOsage tattooing. PlKitograpli 1)DeLancev Cil!. bird is referred to in one particular of the dream rituals as. AIo/-thi//-the-do/-tsa-ge, He-who-becomes-really-old-although-but-going. In specific pas-sages of the ritual it is intimated that these implements had been origi-nally made of the wing bone of this bird and were utilized for doctoringas effectively as for tattooing. NO. eight SMITHSONIAN ENPLORATIONS, I913 69 The coloring matter employed in tattooing is produced of charcoalmixed with kettle black and water. The charcoal is produced fromcertain trees that serve as symbols of lengthy life in the war ceremonies.Tail feathers of the pileated Avoodpecker are nsed for ])utting on theink and drawing the lines. ( )n Xovemljer 17, 1910. a-ce-to/-zhi-ga, one particular of the prominentmen of the Ia-ci-n-gthi// band (Hill-top Dwellers) died. It waslearned that he had a a-x()-be-to-ga, a (ireat a-x6-be. Thisis a white pelican, the l)ir(l which is supposed to have revealed,by way of a dream, the mvst

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Image from web page 365 of “The bird, its form and function” (1906)
Lower back Tattoos

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Identifier: birditsformfuncti00beeb
Title: The bird, its type and function
Year: 1906 (1900s)
Authors: Beebe, William, 1877-1962
Subjects: Birds — Anatomy Birds — Physiology
Publisher: New York, H. Holt and company

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Fig. 276.—Trumpeter Swan asleep. sight, the mice and birds have of its deadly presence.Few birds have a flight as noiseless as that of owls, andin some species the motion of the wings makes, as wenoticed in the pheasant, a very audible sound. When awidgeon rises from the water, the whistling of its quills,so dear to the ears of the sportsman, is very shrill. Adove claps its wings together above its back while gain-ing impetus for flight. The characteristic sound fromwhich a hummingbird takes its name is properly recognized. 34^ The Bird When wild geese and swans nest in captivity, theirwings are put to most excellent use as weapons of de-fence, and of course this use should come into play fre-quently when nesting in their native haunts. I haveseen a man knocked breathless by a Canada gander whothought his nest in danger. When preparing for attack,the bird approaches hissing, with head stretched low alongthe ground, and suddenly, without warning, launches

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Fig 277.—Trumpeter Swan preparing to attack an intruder with its wings. itself straight at ones breast and, clinging with bill andclaws, beats a tattoo with the tough bend of its wings.1 is not most likely to overlook such a drubbing for a longtime. The wings of certain birds are armed with weaponsof offence, such as the Spur-winged Goose, Jacana, Plover,and Screamer. The Spur-winged Goose is a truly danger-ous antagonist and can strike extremely robust blows,bringing the sharp spur to bear with telling effect. These Wings 347 spurs are not claws, but correspond in structure to theordinary spurs on tlie legs of a rooster. The excellent heavy-headed and heavy-bodied hornbillsfly with fantastic effort, and it is stated upon excellent authoritythat when passing low overhead they make a noise likea steam-engine. Even though not strictly inside the prov-

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Image from page 132 of “Letters from the Holy land” (1912)

Friday, August 1st, 2014

Check out these Flower Tattoos photos:

Image from web page 132 of “Letters from the Holy land” (1912)
Flower Tattoos

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Identifier: lettersfromholyl00butlrich
Title: Letters from the Holy land
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Butler, Elizabeth, Lady, 1846-1933
Subjects: Palestine — Description and travel
Publisher: London, A. &amp C. Black

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s. The lanes have been stifling and un-wholesome, the kids pale and sickly, and allhad that exact same blighted look I noticed at Jerusalem.None of them had been tanned, but remained whiteunder such a sun! It was a relief to come outat the other finish and canter back along the marginof the Sea to our camp, for that ride throughTiberias had oppressed and saddened me. Friday, 24-lh Apiil. An early start as the sun rose more than these darkcliffs of the nation of the Gadarenes down whichthe possessed swine careered to the abyss. Good-bye, blessed Sea of Galilee ! AVe had our last lookfrom the immense height near tlie ISIount ofBeatitudes, and thence we turned south-west onour way to Nazareth over the hills of Zebulon. Young shepherds have been piping on small fifes ontlie hills. The country became uninteresting GALILEE, Seeking FROM Close to THEMOUTH OF THE JORDAN TOWARDS THEMOUNT OF BEATITUDES AND TABOR Oleanders in flower skirting shore in foreground.Best of Mount Tabor showing over nearer mountainsin distance.

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LETTERS FROIM THE HOLY LAND 61 (comparatively !) after we left the immediate sur-roundings of the lake till we came to Cana ofGalilee, where we halted, and where I produced myonly failure sketch. It was a dear, holy, lovable landscape, buthillocky and green and impossible in that flatnoontide light. At Cana is the fountain fromwhich undoubtedly was drawn the water for themarriage feast, given that there is absolutely no otherspring in the location. It was a lengthy journey toNazareth. That holy town is extremely lovely, and somuch superior in its buildings to the others—quitewell-to-do and exquisitely situated on the slope ofa cypress-topped hill, in terraces, like a tiny Genoa.Right here culminated my disappointment in the facesof the girls of Palestine, for the tattooing issimply outrageous, worse than anywhere else inthe East. How can they be gorgeous with blueli))s and the mouth surrounded with blue trees,animals and birds ? This spoilt my pleasure incoming upon the Fountain of the Virgin, wherethese ma

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Image from web page 85 of “Old time Hawaiians and their function” (1912)
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Identifier: oldtimehawaiians00lawr
Title: Old time Hawaiians and their perform
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Lawrence, Mary S
Subjects:
Publisher: Boston, New York [and so forth.] Ginn and Co

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s DRESS AND ORNAMENT 67 Evaluation What did people of the old days put on for clothing and for ornament ?What was the dress of the ladies ? How was it created ? How wasit worn ? Describe the dress of the males. How did they put on the malo ? thekihei^ How did girls put on the kihei^ Why did men and women tattoo themselves ? What had been his created of ? Howdid the nobility dress to show their rank ? Compare the ornaments of long ago with these of to-day. Take ashawl and drape it about you to show how the kihei was worn by womenby guys. Fold the shawl for 2i pahi and show how it was worn. Find seeds or flowers or shells or vines and string a lei. ADZ FACTORIES The adz was the most crucial tool. It was madeof cHnkstone, — a hard stone discovered in only a few placeswhich had been usually higher up on the mountains. The fac-tory was often in one particular of these places, and the workwas carried on for only a element of every single year. In our factories to-day every single man has one type of workto do, and so he tends to make component of a lot of articles. In the

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factories of those days the men liked to perform collectively,but there was no division of labor. The adz maker first tested his stone to be positive thatthere w^ere no flaw^s in it then he separated the flakesfrom the rock with a pebble for a hammer. With a clink-stone chisel he chipped it into shape and then groundoff the edges with a stone grindstone. 68 ADZ FACTORIES 69 The deal with was created later from a branch of hate orof other wood. Notice in the picture how a piece of tapais between the adz and the handle, and how securely itis tied with olona or with coconut fibers. The art of adz producing was a secret handed downfrom father to son. It was protected by unique gods, and

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Image from web page 44 of “”Quad’s odds”” (1875)
Flower Tattoos

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Identifier: quadsodds00quad
Title: &quotQuad’s odds&quot
Year: 1875 (1870s)
Authors: Quad, M., 1842-1924
Subjects: American wit and humor
Publisher: Detroit, R. D. S. Tyler &amp Co.

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s path and will not be turnedaside. He has lived among us so extended that to us will comethe sad duty of closing his eyes and folding the cold handsacross the bosom in which death located a resting place atlast. Tears will fall as guys and ladies and childrenknow that he is dead—such tears as come when the heartswells with deep sorrow. They will place flowers on thecoffin, and as it rests ahead of the altar they will listen tohear it said: We knew him as a single whose excellent deeds and kindwords created us all better-hearted. And we shall hope that the angels forgave his sins andremembered practically nothing but his massive heart. DEPRESSIONS. ILLUSTRATED BY THE AUTHOR. WAS hunting more than some of the battle-fields of theRevolutionary war a handful of weeks ago. It is sufficient tosadden the heart of any sutler to wander over these historic fields and hear the explanations of the guides. 1 conies away feeling as if he would like to wrap an American flag about him and be knocked down ten or fifteen instances in the name of Liberty.

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Spot Exactly where Warren Fell. I started out prior to breakfast with an old farmer to seethe spot exactly where Warren fell. We climbed many fences,worried via a marsh, and as we ultimately turned the cor-ner of an old barn the farmer waved his hand and said: Behold the spot! 35 36 THE SECOND FALL. There it was, sure enough, seeking as fresh and healthyas if a hundred years had not beaten a continuous tattoo uponit. In the midst of a little field, a romantic-seeking oldbarn in the distance, was the depression. Did he fall from his horse, or from a balloon ? I askedthe guide, but he replied that he couldnt say. It hadbeen some small time given that the war, and he had forgotten. Struck on his head, I suppose ? I remarked as Iraised up to get a clearer view of the spot. The old man said he didnt know about that neverheard any a single say. But see here, I said as I leaned back how dare youcall yourself a guide and charge me fifty cents when youknow practically nothing of the history of this spot ? Waal, all I know is tha

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