Posts Tagged ‘1919’

Image from page 113 of “All-natural history” (1919)

Thursday, February 5th, 2015

Some cool Dog Tattoos images:

Image from page 113 of “All-natural history” (1919)
Dog Tattoos

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Identifier: naturalhistory07ameruoft
Title: Organic history
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: American Museum of Natural History
Subjects: Natural history
Publisher: New York : American Museum of Organic History
Contributing Library: Robarts – University of Toronto
Digitizing Sponsor: University of Toronto

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mally committed October 13with elaborate ceremonies under the patronage of the Emperor andEmpress of Germany. The American Museum will be representedon the occasion by Director Bumpus. THE ROBLEY COLLECTIONS OF MAORI HEADS. HE Division of Ethnology is specifically fortunate inhaving secured last May the outstanding and practi-cally distinctive collection of tattooed heads of ancientMaoris which Main Common G. Robley of the Brit-ish Army spent many years in assembling at infinitepains and fantastic expense in Xew Zealand and fromother authentic sources. These heads, thirty five in number, illustrateall the diverse styles of the art of tattooing as practised among theMaoris prior to the year 1831. At that time the British governmentforbade additional tattooing, simply because the high value set on the headsby souvenir hunters led to the commission of several murders. A fulldescription of the series of heads and of the outfit of ancient tattooingtools received therewith is reserved for later publication.

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MUSEUM NEWS NOTES. The fantastic meteorite identified as Ahnighito which Commander R. E.Peary, U. S. N., secured in the summer of 1897 on the shores of CapeYork in northern Greenland was transferred in August from the posi-tion which it has occupied for about two years beneath the arch at theentrance to the Museum to its permanent abiding spot in the Foyer. MUSEUM NEWS NOTES 101 The task of moving this 36^ ton mass of iron to its present positionwith all the resources of the city at command and with plenty of timefor the function has produced us realize more than ever before the braveryand ability shown by Mr. Peary in bringing the meteorite away from itsArctic home. A thrilling account of Mr. Pearys expedition for theSaviksue or Cape York meteorites might be discovered in his book North-ward more than the wonderful Ice, and a short notice of the 3 irons, Ahnighito,the Lady and the Dog, comprising the group might be identified in theAmerican Museum Journal for January, 1905. The Gem Collection has received as a gift from

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Image from web page 419 of “The life and labors of David Livingstone, LL. D., D.C.L., covering his complete profession in Southern and Central Africa. Very carefully prepared from the most authentic sources…The whole rendered clear and plain by a most precise map of
Dog Tattoos

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Identifier: lifelaborsofdavi1875cham
Title: www.flickr.com/pictures/internetarchivebookimages/tags/book…
Year: 1875 (1870s)
Authors: Chambliss, J. E
Subjects: Livingstone, David, 1813-1873
Publisher: Philadelphia, Hubbard bros. [and so forth., and so forth.]
Contributing Library: Wellesley College Library
Digitizing Sponsor: Boston Library Consortium Member Libraries

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fy the attempt to take the Pioneer down to the sea. The function of the expedition hadcome to be little better than a struggle with the slave-trade.The breaking up of that evil was the absorbing thought of themembers of it. It could hardly have been otherwise. Thehumanity of Englishmen and Christians could but arise againstsuch barbarities as confronted them in each and every path they selected.The short journey to the northwest, which extended as far asthe village of Chinanga, on the banks of a branch of theLoangwa, only deepened the conviction of the utter hopeless-ness of all enterprises which may seek the improvement of thepeople and the utilization of the nation until the land shouldle relieved of the fatal site visitors which flourished everywhere bythe patronage of Portugal. It is no wonder that Dr. Livingstone turned again towardthe sea with anything but friendly feelings toward a govern-ment whose dog in the manger spirit had produced six preciousyears, years of discomfort and comparative disappointment.

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MISSION CHAPEL ON THE SHIBE. CHAPTER XX. THE Beginning OF THE End. Zambesi Expedition Unsatisfactory—Zanzibar — Trade from Zanzibar—TheOutfit—Bovuma Bay—Kindany—The Makonde—Remarkable Vegetation—Cutting Bight Valiantly—Bage for Doctorship—Mohammedan Influence—Lying Guides—Along the Bovuma—Troubles with Followers—Gum-CopalTree—Extravagant Tattooing—Top of the Fashion—At Nyomano—The Slave-Trade—The Makoa—A Woman Bescued—Horrors of the Trade in Slaves—Currency for Africa—Extracts from Journal—A Deserted Village—A ModelTown of Africa. No one was completely satisfied with the Zambesi expedi-tion. It had price considerable sums of funds, significantly precioustime had been consumed, and some extremely valuable lives had beensacrificed, although comparatively small progress had been produced infinding out the nation, the anticipations of advantageous com-mercial relations drastically disappointed, and missionary enthu-siasm discouraged. There have been nonetheless some impor

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Image from web page 42 of “Indian history for young folks” (1919)

Sunday, August 24th, 2014

A few nice Bear Tattoos pictures I identified:

Image from web page 42 of “Indian history for young folks” (1919)
Bear Tattoos

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Identifier: indianhistoryfor00drak
Title: Indian history for young people
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Drake, Francis S. (Francis Samuel), 1828-1885 Dowd, Francis Joseph, 1876-
Subjects: Indians of North America Indians of North America — Wars
Publisher: New York London : Harper &amp Brothers

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The tortoise, the bear, the beaver, the turtle, and the wolfwere the totems of the 1st families. The figure representing thetotem of his tribe was tattooed upon the Indians breast. The spirit of theanimal was supposed es-pecially to favor the clanthus represented. Marriage could notbe contracted betweenkindred of close to degree,or households getting thesame totem. Husbandand wife in the samefamily have to be of dif-ferent clans If thepresents of the lover tothe father of his intend-ed have been accepted, shebecame his wife, thoughneither could have spo-ken to the other, and fora although the husband hada home in her fatherslodge. The presents have been known to be returned and the match broken oft since therewas no powder-horn sent. A peculiar technique of match-generating prevails amongst the Moquis ofNew Mexico—a straightforward, pleased, and most hospitable folks. There thefair one selects the youth who pleases her, and her father proposes thematch to the sire of the fortunate swain. Such is the arallantrv of the

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INDIAN COUNCIL. Ml I INDIAN HISTORY KOK YOlXi People.

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Image from web page 104 of “The Literary digest history of the planet war, compiled from original and contemporary sources: American, British, French, German, and other individuals” (1919)

Saturday, August 16th, 2014

A few good Western Tattoos photos I discovered:

Image from page 104 of “The Literary digest history of the planet war, compiled from original and contemporary sources: American, British, French, German, and other folks” (1919)
Western Tattoos

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Identifier: literarydigesthi05hals
Title: The Literary digest history of the world war, compiled from original and modern sources: American, British, French, German, and other folks
Year: 1919 (1910s)
Authors: Halsey, Francis W. (Francis Whiting), 1851-1919, comp
Subjects: Globe War, 1914-1918
Publisher: New York, London, Funk &amp Wagnalls Firm

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cloud. As the sky darkened and the wind blewmists away, huge flames were noticed burning in Bailleul,in the glare dark masses of walls and broken roofs outlinedjaggedly by fire. To the left the village of Locre was aflameunder a storm of higher explosives. There were burning farmsand hamlets as far south as Merville, and lesser fires ofsingle cottages and haystacks. The wind drifted smoke 80 LUDENDORFFS COLOSSAL DRIVE IX THE WEST across the sky in extended white ribbons. Drum-fire broke outand the earth trembled with it. It was like the beating ofall the drums of the world in muffled tattoo, above whichand by way of which had been massive clangoring hammer-strokes. For miles all this panorama of battle was boilingand seething with bursting shells and curling wreaths ofsmoke from batteries in action. When darkness came eachbattery was revealed by its flashes, all the fields aroundfilled with red wingings and sharp stabs of flame. Singleguns spoke with overpowering, voices shaking the ground with

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(C) INTERNATIONAL F.lM SER. ICE N Y. AMERICAN SOLDIERS PROTECTED AGAINST GERMAN POISON GAS an earthquake tremor. There was no genuine darkness of night.Every single second the sky was crossed by rushes of light, burn-ing beacons, and gun-flashes etching outlines of trees andcottages. Practically till darkness came, airmen have been flyinglow, browsing by way of the mists for movements of troops,in order to get in touch with guns to shell and scatter them.-^ The British army had been going by means of a severe strain,and that strain was reflected at home. The scenario hadhad crucial moments and nevertheless was decidedly an anxious one. ^Dispatch from Philip Gibbs in The Occasions (New York). 81 ON THE WESTERN FRONT The British army was playing the function which it frequently hadplayed prior to. It was fighting a Waterloo. Multiply thebattle of Waterloo a hundredfold and the circumstance at noonin that battle corresponded to the circumstance now in the greatworld-battle. The huge job which the British armyhad performed and nevertheless was performin

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Image from page 60 of “The School techniques book methods, aids, devices, material for the support of teachers of elementary school classes” (1917)
Western Tattoos

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Identifier: schoolmethodsboo00oakpa
Title: The College strategies book strategies, aids, devices, material for the assist of teachers of elementary college classes
Year: 1917 (1910s)
Authors:
Subjects: Teaching School management and organization
Publisher: Oak Park, Ill., G. W. Jones

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d cran-nies serve the redheads for storehouses—knot-holes,pockets below patches of raised bark, cracks betweenshingles, and in fences, and even railroad ties. Some-occasions, as an alternative of nuts, grasshoppers and other eatablesare put away in storage. The smart birds at occasions makereal caches, concealing their retailers by hammering downpieces of wood or bark more than them. Beechnuts are such a big component of the fall and win-ter meals of the redheads in some localities that, likethe gray squirrels, the birds are frequent in great beech- nut winters and absent in other people. Cold and snow donot problems them, if they have a lot to consume, for, asMajor Bendire says, numerous of them winter along ournorthern border, in certain years, when they can findan abundant supply of meals. In fact, in the greaterpiart of the eastern states the redhead is a rather regu-lar resident, but in the western element of its range itappears to migrate quite regularly, so that it is rareto see 1 north of latitude 40 degrees in winter. The

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Red-headed Woodpecker western boundary of the redheads variety is the Rockymountains, but east of the mountains it breeds fromManitoba and northern New York south to the Gulfof Mexico tho it is a rare bird in eastern New Eng-land. 60 THE School Methods BOOK Migration In sections where this erratic woodpecker migrates,it leaves its nesting grounds early in October, and re-turns the latter element of April or the beginning of Could.Prior to also a lot taken up with the critical company oflife, the redhead goes gaily about, as Key Bendiresays, frolicking and playing hide-and-seek with itsmate, and when not so engaged, amusing itself by drum-ming on some resonant dead limb, or on the roof andsides of homes, barns, and so forth. For tho, like other drum-mers, the woodpeckers are not discovered in the front ranksof the orchestra, they beat a royal tattoo that may wellexpress several fine feelings. Nest When the musical spring holiday is more than and thebirds have chosert a tree for the nest, they hew out a.pocket in a

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