Posts Tagged ‘account’

Image from web page 416 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a common account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the wonderful continents and principal islands” (1888)

Tuesday, October 28th, 2014

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Image from web page 416 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants being a common account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the wonderful continents and principal islands” (1888)
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Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants getting a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the fantastic continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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llow tinge of the Chinaman. They have extended, black,rather thin beards, at times plaited. All the folks, of each sexes,have a space shaven on the crown of the head and the rest of the longhair is gathered up and twisted into a knot over the bald spot, andtransfixed with two peculiar pins, the metal of which varies with rank.The females have the backs of their hands tattooed. The expression ofthe folks is virtually always gentle and pleasing, although somewhat sad. Napha-kiang, the seat of government, is peculiar in structure, thehouses being constructed in tiny enclosures, separated from the street andone yet another by huge limestone walls from eight to fourteen feethigh but in other respects it is like a Japanese town. The climateis practically tropical, though the chief vegetation is of a temperate charac-ter. Rice, wheat, and sweet-potatoes are the principal crops and tobaccois largely grown. A far more pleased and laughter-loving men and women, says arecent visitor. Dr. Guillemard, can scarcely be identified.

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Image from web page 73 of “An account of the manners and customs of the modern day Egyptians, written in Egypt in the course of the years 1833-1835” (1842)

Saturday, October 25th, 2014

A couple of nice Clover Tattoos pictures I located:

Image from web page 73 of “An account of the manners and customs of the modern Egyptians, written in Egypt throughout the years 1833-1835” (1842)
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Identifier: accountofmanners00laneuoft
Title: An account of the manners and customs of the modern day Egyptians, written in Egypt throughout the years 1833-1835
Year: 1842 (1840s)
Authors: Lane, Edward William, 1801-1876
Subjects: Egypt — Social life and customs Egypt — History 19th century
Publisher: London, Ward, Lock and co.

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a custom somewhat equivalent tothat above described : it consists in generating indelible marks of ablue or greenish hue upon the face and other parts, or, at least,upon the front of the chin, and upon the back of the proper hand,and often also upon the left hand, the correct arm, or each arms,the feet, the middle of the bosom, and the forehead : the mostcommon of these marks made upon the chin and hands are hererepresented. The operation is performed with many needles(typically seven) tied with each other : with these the skin is pricked inthe desired pattern : some smoke-black (of wood or oil), mixedwith milk from the breast of a lady, is then rubbed in andabout a week right after, before the skin has healed, a paste of thepounded fresh leaves of white beet or clover is apj^licd, and givesa blue or greenish colour to the marks: or, to create the sameeffect in a far more simple manner, some indigo is rubbed into the 34 THE Modern day EGYPTIANS. punctures, alternatively of the smoke-black, and so forth. It is generally per-

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A TATTOOED GIRL. % m WW II ( srECIMKNS OF TATTOOING ON THE CHIN.

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Image from page 101 of “The land and the Book or, Biblical illustrations drawn from the manners and customs, the scenes and scenery of the Holy Land” (1874)
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Identifier: landbookorbibli01thom
Title: The land and the Book or, Biblical illustrations drawn from the manners and customs, the scenes and scenery of the Holy Land
Year: 1874 (1870s)
Authors: Thomson, William McClure, 1806-1894
Subjects: Bible Bible
Publisher: New York, Harper

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t that which gives such a blue tinge to their lips ? Yes and these marks on the forehead, chin, breast, arms,hands, and feet, are all different patterns and figures of thismost ancient art. The impact is any thing but agreeable toour taste. All Orientals, nevertheless, have a passion for it.Moses either instituted some such custom, or appropriatedone already current to a religious purpose. He says. Andthou shalt show thy son in that day, saying, this is carried out be-result in of that which the Lord did unto me when I cameforth out of Egypt and it shall be for a sign unto thee uponthy hand, and for a memorial in between thine eyes (or 16th)for a token upon thy hand, and for frontlets amongst thineeyes.^ This practice of marking religious tokens upon thehands and arms is almost univeisal among the Arabs, of allsects and classes. Christian pilgrims to Jerusalem have theoperation performed there, as the most holv spot identified to ■ Hub. ii. 11. » Gen. i. 19. Exod. xiii. 9 and 16. THE LAND AND THE BOOK.

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6rE(IMEN:J OK TATTOOING. their religion. T have watclied the method of imprintmgthem, and it is not a little painful. A number of needlesare bound tightly collectively in the shape of the preferred fig-ure, or so that the figure can be marked out by them. Theskin being punctured in the required pattern, particular mix-tures of coloring matter are rubbed in, and the place bound TATTOOING—FRONTLETS. 93 with a tight bandage. Gunpowder, variously prepared, isvery generally employed, and it is that which gives to thetattooing of these Bedawin its bluish tinge. Mr. Lane tellsus that in Egypt smoke-black mixed with the milk of awoman is utilized, and subsequently a paste of fresh-poundedleaves of clover, or white beet, is applied, so as to give agreenish blue colour to the marks. It is properly ascertainedthat this tattooing prevailed in Egypt even before the timeof Moses. If he appropriated it to sacred purposes, thepatterns may possibly have been so devised as to commemorate thedeliverance of the youngsters of Israe

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Image from page 397 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants being a well-liked account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the excellent continents and principal islands” (1888)

Friday, September 26th, 2014

Some cool Animal Tattoos photos:

Image from web page 397 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants being a well-liked account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the fantastic continents and principal islands” (1888)
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Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the wonderful continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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&gt0 lAillLV. CHAPTER XI. Japan compared with Wonderful Britain—Early history—The Mikado—Rise of the Shogxins—Mongolinvasion—Development of feudal system—The revolution of 1868—The new constitution-Early European visitors—Recent treaties with foreigners—Modern changes — Japanesephysical features—Mental capacity and character—Imitation of Europeans—The content des-patch—Japanese ladies—Muscular peasantry—Acrobats—Tattooing—Dress—The Mmono—Hair-dressing—The chignon—Powder and paint—Rough country dress—Wedding ceremonies—Delight in children Their obedience, great temper, and docUity —Schools—Teaching of girls—The public baths—Houses and furniture—Religion—The Ainos of Japan—Distinct fromMongol type—Hairiness —Physical character—Aino womens looks —Children —Clothing—JeweUery — Houses—Food — Sake — Curios — Hunting—Notions of religion—Marriage— Goodqualities—The Loo-choo islanders—Physical characters.

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al civilisation of western Europe. Xp YEN much more than China, Japan bespeaks and com maiids our interest. She occupies in severa respects a parallel position to Excellent Britain—as an Japan com- ^^^^1^1 i^ower, as obtaining developed to her pared with present condition by way of an elaborateGreat Britain. ,&gt -, ^ . , . , • ^ leudal sjstem, as obtaining excellent mineralwealth and manufacturing talent, as including theflower of the Mongoloid folks, and especiall} ashaving lately thrown off ancient traditions to avery massive extent, and adopted several functions of the 381 THE TAPANESE. 385 PM i|lil!|3ll|II11lllii|l|l!ll!IINIIIMJI

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Image from page 431 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a well-known account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the wonderful continents and principal islands” (1888)
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Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants getting a well-liked account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the wonderful continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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a couple of obtaining guns.They consume raw flesh ofcarnivora, as effectively asother animals. ThejReligion and ^^e a lot more ormorals, i^ss Christ-ianised, but Shamanismhas far more power overthem, and they havenot completed a lot morethan borrow St. Nicholasfrom the Russians, as somany Siberian nativeshave completed. They onlyshow degradation ofmorals where corruptedby Russians they hatetheft and disturbances,and are each kind andgentle. If they aredirty, according to ourideas, they are Hke mostof the less civihsed andsome of the so-calledcivilised peoples. TheirMusical stringed mu-instruments. g^cal instru-ments are worthy ofnotice. 1 of them,the domhra, is boat-likeand has five strings.The Hungarian Mag-yars, it will be remem-bered, have just such aninstrument, the tomhora,in itself a effective con-firmation of the rela-tionship of the peoples.Their language too is.of all Finnish types, that which approaches most closely the Magyar.Their inordinate consumption of sphits appears probably soon to make an endof the Ostiaks.

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OSTIAK OF OBI BASIN. THE INHABITANTS OF SIBERIA. 419 The Voguls. The Voguls of the Ural ridges, who are closely allied in race to theOstiaks, probably represent the primitive stock from which the Magyarssprang. They are an undersized hunting individuals, not far more than five,000in quantity. With theirthick furs,says M. Rec-lus, the hoods deckedto right and left withanimals ears, they at adistance look like wildanimals but their coun-tenance is timid, evenfrightened. Theyshave off their hair andmoustaches. They haveconformed to the GreekChurch and been bap-tized, but they nonetheless havetheir loved ones totems,—bows and arrows, circles,and so forth.,—tattooed on theirheads, arms, and legs.Their tribes are veryisolated, decreased almostto families, and theyare but tiny united.Wives are left on veryslight provocation andinstances are identified ofthe hunter living soli-tary soon after such a divorce,with only his reindeerand his dog for com-pany. Their burials arevery simple a hole dugin the gTound when amember died su

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Image from page 414 of “Ridpath’s history of the globe becoming an account of the ethnic origin, primitive estate, early migrations, social situations and present guarantee of the principal families of guys ..” (1897)

Saturday, September 13th, 2014

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Image from page 414 of “Ridpath’s history of the world getting an account of the ethnic origin, primitive estate, early migrations, social conditions and present promise of the principal families of men ..” (1897)
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Identifier: ridpathshistoryo01ridp
Title: Ridpath’s history of the planet getting an account of the ethnic origin, primitive estate, early migrations, social conditions and present promise of the principal families of men ..
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Ridpath, John Clark, 1840-1900
Subjects: World history Ethnology
Publisher: New York, Merrill &amp Baker

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instances taken andeaten by the natives. The very best piece ofAndaman workmanship is the rudecanoe, hollowed by signifies of a stoneax and fire. The individuals use the bowand arrow, and point their missiles withsuch bits of glass and iron as they areable to gather from the wrecks of vessels.Travelers have admired their ability inmarksmanship, which is generally accu-price to the distance of fifty yards. Theytake fish by implies of hooks and netsand harpoons. It has been noted thatthey are exceedingly agile in the water,and the tradition exists that the divingnative is at times in a position, by the rapidityof his action, to clutch a fish with hisunaided hand. In their personal habits the Anda-maners are exceedingly filthy and coarse.They smear themselves … .. Filthiness of with mud, and put on no personal habits •,clothing. Tattooing is the makes use of of the dead&ltcommon practice of the tribe, but thecicatrices exhibit significantly less talent in designthan in the case of other tribes. It isthe custom of the individuals to dig up and

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392 Great RACES OF MANKIND. distribute the bones of the dead, theskull becoming reserved for the widow.This she suspends by a cord about herneck and uses as a casket for her orna-ments and valuables! It is believed thatthese savages have not succeeded indomesticating any of the animals, thoughit has been noted that tame fowls areseen about their huts. For the rest,their state is one of absolute savagery. The identical may be stated of the Tasma-nians. Captain Cook has left a recordLow estate of • to the impact that thesethe Tasmanians peopie have neither houses use and preser- i r vationoffire. nor clothing. Nor does itappear that they possessed canoes or

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Image from page 210 of “Schley and Santiago an historical account of the blockade and final destruction of the Spanish fleet beneath command of Admiral Pasquale Cervera, July 3, 1898” (1902)

Sunday, September 7th, 2014

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Image from page 210 of “Schley and Santiago an historical account of the blockade and final destruction of the Spanish fleet beneath command of Admiral Pasquale Cervera, July 3, 1898” (1902)
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Identifier: cu31924020422121
Title: Schley and Santiago an historical account of the blockade and final destruction of the Spanish fleet under command of Admiral Pasquale Cervera, July three, 1898
Year: 1902 (1900s)
Authors: Graham, George Edward, 1866- Schley, Winfield Scott, 1839-1911
Subjects: Santiago, Battle of, Santiago de Cuba, Cuba, 1898 Spanish-American War, 1898
Publisher: Chicago, W. B. Conkey firm

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rn of the Reina Mercedesand exploded. The two right after-guns then spoke, and thenthe entrance of the harbor of Santiago de Cubawas shut out of vision from the battleship. By this time the little cruiser New Orleanshad come in range, and the forts had been openinga steady fire from what had been evidently higher-energy modern guns. The shells dropped thickand quickly over or quick of the Massachusetts,and the American blue-jackets jeered andlaughed at the negative aim of the Spaniards. Onevery nicely-put shot went close, through theupperworks of the Massachusetts, but it did nothit anything and just created a splashing inthe water upon the other side of the battleship. Properly, the dagoes are receiving a little bet-ter, mentioned a sailor. The remark triggered one more waggish blue-jacket to say: Oh, give them a year and they will learnto shoot. The extended rifles of the New Orleans were bythis time playing a tattoo on the low-lying fortsnear the entrance, so as to draw their fire andascertain their range, and the Iowas biggest

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&lt^smgm, Copyright, iy02, by V . B. Conkey Firm. T/iey are all out and coming to the west(xvii) AND SANTIAGO lyy twelve-inch guns had been hurling steel projectilesinto the harbor entrance. The forts kept up a best cannonade andsome of their shots have been effectively aimed, so far asthe variety was concerned, but they were noteffective. The Cristobal Colon opened fire with her bigguns, but her shells in no way once came near theline. Soon after operating a mile to the eastward theMassachusetts, followed by the other Americanwarships, circled about and ran back more than verynearly the exact same course, steaming west bysouth. On receiving near the exact same range atwhich the firing opened before, the warshipsfired with their starboard batteries, and afterdelivering a single round drew out of the Span-iards variety, Commodore Schley saying as hestepped to the quarter-deck: Effectively, we let them know that we have someammunition, and I know their capacity fordefense. For half an hour following the ships had passed a mile out of the rang

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Image from web page 88 of “The landing-force and little-arm directions, United States Navy, 1905” (1905)
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Identifier: landingforcesmal00unit
Title: The landing-force and small-arm instructions, United States Navy, 1905
Year: 1905 (1900s)
Authors: United States. Bureau of Naval Personnel Fullam, William F. (William Freeland), 1855-1926 United States Naval Institute
Subjects: United States. Navy United States. Navy United States. Navy
Publisher: Annapolis, Md., Naval Institute

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rning, guard-mounting need to adhere to morning parade. (six) Fatigue is the signal for policing camp or quarters, and forworking-parties to commence perform. (7) Drill-get in touch with is usually sounded after the morning fatigue du-ties have been performed, or following dinner. (eight) Assembly, signal to type by organizations. (9) Recall from drill is the signal for drill to cease. (ten) Dinner-contact, usually at noon. (11) Retreat at sunset, when the troops should appear underarms, climate permitting orders and detail for the following dayare published then. (12) Supper-call normally follows parade. (13) Tattoo not earlier than 9 nor later than ten.30 p. m. (14) Taps from fifteen to thirty minutes following tattoo. (15) To Arms is the signal of alarm. The command shouldturn out beneath arms. (16) The basic is the signal to break camp and prepare tomarch. Camping, Bivouacs, Cantonments.BIVOUACS. 87 23. (1) In fine climate the bivouac is far more healthy than thecamp, especially if operating in a wooded country where fires

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Plate two.Rubber-blanket Art. 23.as a shelter-tent. can be maintained very easily. (Plates2 and three.) (two) In picking a internet site for abivouac, wood and water are thegreat requisites a good supplyof the former is all the moreessential if the nights are cold. (three) The fires need to be soconstructed as not to be seenfrom the distance, to be quicklyextinguished, to admit of manygathering around them, and atthe very same time to economize fuel.As a rule, if warmth is desired,see that the fire is kept close tothe ground if light is wanted,elevate it iy2 or 2 feet above theground. CANTONMENTS. 24. (1) Cantonments are theinhabited areas which troopsoccupy for shelter when not putinto barracks. (two) The bg. c. indicates theplace where the command shallassemble in case of alarm. It uJ-fi fTQOO yards. I I I I • © © f® &gt 4i 4t 4« h four* A A* A i qo * ® 1 Plate 3. Art. 23Bivouac.a a a a Double sentries, b b, Choose-ets, c, Assistance of outpost, d, Mainbody, e, Kitchens, f, Business offi-cers, g,

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Image from web page 73 of “An account of the manners and customs of the contemporary Egyptians, written in Egypt during the years 1833-1835” (1842)

Friday, August 29th, 2014

Some cool Bear Tattoos pictures:

Image from web page 73 of “An account of the manners and customs of the modern Egyptians, written in Egypt throughout the years 1833-1835” (1842)
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Identifier: accountofmanners00laneuoft
Title: An account of the manners and customs of the modern Egyptians, written in Egypt in the course of the years 1833-1835
Year: 1842 (1840s)
Authors: Lane, Edward William, 1801-1876
Subjects: Egypt — Social life and customs Egypt — History 19th century
Publisher: London, Ward, Lock and co.

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A TATTOOED GIRL. % m WW II ( srECIMKNS OF TATTOOING ON THE CHIN.

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TATTOOED HANDS AND FOOT. formed at the age of about five or six years, and by gipsy-girls.Tiie term applied to it is dakk. Most of the females of the DJ?ESS. 35 greater components of Upper Egypt, who are of a extremely crark complexion,tattoo their lips instead of the parts above-talked about ] therefore con-verting their organic colour to a dull, bluish hue, which, to theeye of a stranger, is really displeasing.^ An additional characteristic of the Egyptian girls that need to behere described is their upright carriage and gait. This is mostremarkable in the female peasantry, owing, doubtless, in a greatmeasure, to their habit of bearing a heavy earthen water-vessel,and other burthens, upon the head. The dress of the ladies of the middle and greater orders ishandsome and sophisticated. Their shirt is extremely complete, like that of themen—but rather shorter—reaching not quite to the knees : it isalso, typically, of the very same kind of material as the mens shirt, or ofcoloured crape—sometimes black, A pair of extremely wide t

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Image from page 674 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants being a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the fantastic continents and principal islands” (1888)
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Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a well-liked account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the fantastic continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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length of theavenue. In the centre is a platform, of tampedclay, with a heavy tree-trunk sunk into it, and in thebeen scooped out a number of troughs, so that severalpound grain at once. The homes are separated into two or a lot more apartments and on account of the compact nature of the clay and tampedfloor are simply kept clean. The roofs are shiny with the reek ofsmoke, as even though they had been painted with coal-tar. The householdchattels or furnishings are restricted to meals-baskets, earthenware pots, anassortment of wicker-operate dishes, the loved ones shield, spears, knives,swords, and tools, and the fish-baskets lying outside. They are tolerablyhospitable, and permit strangers the free of charge use of their dwellings. Thebananas and plantains are very luxuriant, whilst the Guinea palms supplythe individuals with oil and wine the forests give them fuel, the rivers fish,and the gardens cassava, ground-nuts, and Indian corn. The chiefsenact strict laws, and although possessed of but small actual power, either

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MANYEMA GIRL. wood havewomen could 662 THE INHABITANTS OF AFRICA. of wealth or retinue, precise the utmost deference, and are exceedinglyceremonious, becoming constantly followed by a drummer, who taps his drumwith masterly talent. At Rubunga, about the most northerly point reached by the Congo,the natives dress their hair in tufts on the back of the head, fastenedNatives of with iron hair-pins. Tattooing is carried to excess, everyRubunga portion of the skin bearing punctured marks, from the roots ofthe hair down to the knees. Their breasts are like hieroglyphic parch-ment charts, marked with raised figures, ledges, squares, circles, wavylines, tuberose knots, rosettes, and each conceivable design and style. No colour-ing substance had been introduced into these incisions and punctures the cuticle had basically been tortured and irritated by the injectionof some irritants or air. Indeed, some of the glossy tubercles, whichcontained air, were as massive as hens eggs. As numerous as six thin ledgesmarked the foreh

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Image from page 665 of “The new dispensatory : containing I. the elements of pharmacy : II. the materia medica, or an account of the substances employed in medicine, with the virtues and uses of every single article, so far as they are warranted by knowledge and

Thursday, August 28th, 2014

A handful of nice Animal Tattoos photos I identified:

Image from page 665 of “The new dispensatory : containing I. the elements of pharmacy : II. the materia medica, or an account of the substances employed in medicine, with the virtues and uses of each and every article, so far as they are warranted by experience and
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Identifier: newdispensatoryc1765lewi
Title: The new dispensatory : containing I. the components of pharmacy : II. the materia medica, or an account of the substances employed in medicine, with the virtues and uses of each write-up, so far as they are warranted by knowledge and observation : III. the preparations and compositions of the new London and Edinburgh pharmacopoeias with such of the old ones as are kept in the shops the most celebrated foreign medicines the most helpful of these directed in the hospitals sundry elegant extemporaneous types, &ampc. digested in such a technique as to compose a typical technique of pharmacy with remarks on their preparation and uses the means of distinguishing adulterations of performing the much more hard and hazardous processes with ease and safety, &ampc. : the entire interspersed with sensible cautions and observations
Year: 1765 (1760s)
Authors: Lewis, William, 1708-1781
Subjects: Pharmacopoeias Dispensatories Dispensatories
Publisher: London : Printed for J. Nourse, bookseller in ordinary to his majesty

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ttle to bleeding, isone of the bell external remedies*It is to be fpread on lint, and ap-plied at bed-time. Cataplasma emolliens.Emollient caiaplajm.Take of Crumb of bread, eight ouncesWhite foap, a single ounce Cows milk, frcfh, a fufficientquantity* Medicinal Compofitions. Portion IV# Boil them a small collectively. Cataplasma stomachicum.Stomachic cataplafm.Take of The aromatic cataplafm^ one ounce Expreffed oil of mace, two drams Anodyne balfam, as significantly as isfufficient to lessen them intoa correct confiflence. Cataplasma CAMPHORATtJM. Camphorated cataplafm*Take of Aromatic cataplafm, one particular oonce Camphor, one particular dram.Mix them together. Cataplasma ischiadicum,Ifchiadic cataplajht.Take of Muftard feed, half a pound White pepper.Ginger, every one dram Easy oxymel, as a lot as willreduce them into a cataplafm* The ufe of thefe compofitions,which are taken from our holpi-tals, may possibly be eaflly underflood fromtheir titles. The laft is a verySimulating application, and fre-quently veflcates the ikin.

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INDEX. I N D E X. ABforbent earths fage 62 Acacia, -Egyptian 73German 205, 400 Acids 61 animal 143 mintral ^ 24 marine 25, 448 nitrous 25, 447 vitriolic 25, 443 vegetable 8, 14 Acrids 69 Adder 245 Adderftongue ^ 188 ^thiops, fee Ethiops ih. Affinities of bodies 27 Agaric y6 of the oak 76 Agrimony yyhemp-agrimony 139 water-agrimony 139^ Alder 79 black alder 79 Alcohol 381 Ales medicated 301 aperient 302r bitter 302 Butlers 302 cephalic 302 diuretic 302 fcorbutic 303 Alexanders 153 Alkaline infufion 276 falts, fixt gf, 423, volatile 429 4^1kanet ^ij Allfpice 201 Almonds 85 exprefTed oil two.66 Almond foap 436 Aloes – 79 purified 262 gum 407 refm 407 Aloes elixir page 323 pills 325 wine 2gz wood je Alterative mercurials, &ampc. fe^ Mercurials, 5fC. Alum tz burnt or dried 464 curd iB^ water or folution ib» whey 288 Amber 234 prepared 256 balfam 481 compound powder 554 tindture 31^ troches ^^^ oil, fait and fplrit 481 Ambergris 83 eflence 328 Ammoniac fait, fee Salt ih» Ammoniacum gum 84

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Oval Lava Cuff Links
Animal Tattoos

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Image from page 324 of “Ridpath’s Universal history : an account of the origin, primitive situation and ethnic improvement of the great races of mankind, and of the principal events in the evolution and progress of the civilized life amongst males and nations

Monday, August 18th, 2014

A handful of good Polynesian Tattoos pictures I located:

Image from page 324 of “Ridpath’s Universal history : an account of the origin, primitive condition and ethnic development of the great races of mankind, and of the principal events in the evolution and progress of the civilized life among males and nations
Polynesian Tattoos

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Identifier: ridpathsuniversa08ridp
Title: Ridpath’s Universal history : an account of the origin, primitive situation and ethnic improvement of the great races of mankind, and of the principal events in the evolution and progress of the civilized life among guys and nations, from current and genuine sources with a preliminary inquiry on the time, place and manner of the starting
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Ridpath, John Clark, 1840-1900
Subjects: World history
Publisher: Cincinnati : Jones

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of collecting and work-ing into the desired forms. The nationalfashion demands that the heavy head offrizzed hair be ornamented as muchas feasible with feathers, leaves, andflowers. These are held in spot withbamboo combs. It is also the custom touse tattoo as a implies of bodily decoration.The breast and the back are scarified insuch way as to raise cicatrices in regularpatterns, and it has been noticed thatthe barbarians, given that the introduction ofEuropean figured goods, are Avilling toimitate the patterns of the very same in tat-tooing their bodies! The industries and arts of the Papuansextend to agricultural pursuits. On thisMalay influence side of their life thev alsoSfSS- recommend the Malays: Itins- is believed by these who have investigated the subject that therude agriculture of native New Guinea has been derived from Asiatic sources.This belief is strengthened by the factthat the Papuans, savage as they are,divide their lands, and hold them in themanner of individual house. Some of

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NATIVE OF MAFOR ISLAND—TYPE.Drawn by E. Mesples, from a photograph. these are cultivated with a lot more care thanwe need to expect at the hands of such apeople in such a country. The traveleron the north coast of New Guinea findshere and there a plantation with inclos-ures, and even terraces, that may nicely 734 Excellent RACES OE MANKIND. remind him of primitive Central Amer- jiea. Into such locations, however, savage Isuperstition nevertheless enters, and the Papuanhousehold, in case of the death of someof its members, is apt to abandon theplace, and to settle at a distance in theforest where no death has been. An additional item of the industrial liferelates to boats and boating. With re- the Brown Polynesians is noticed in theimproved navigation and the dispositionto trade. It might be conceded that piracy is onestage in the civilized life, or in the de-velopment of the civilized f£ r .-I 1 Piratical habits life, of the ocean peoples. ofthe Papuans. Undoubtedly the craft and the courage requisite for such busi

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Image from page 646 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants being a well-known account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the great continents and principal islands” (1888)

Thursday, August 14th, 2014

Some cool Western Tattoos pictures:

Image from web page 646 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants being a well-known account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the excellent continents and principal islands” (1888)
Western Tattoos

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Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a well-liked account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the fantastic continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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animals.Moreover, such animals as may provide meals are tabooed, elephant toone, monkey to an additional, crocodile to an additional but the craving for animalfood becomes uncontrollable at occasions, and accounts for considerably cannibalism.In late years these men and women have had the wit to adapt themselves to cir-cumstances, and turn out to be merchants and caniers for their Europeansuperiors. The Fans are in each and every way a more effective individuals, living just north THE WESTERN AFRICANS. 633 and south of the Equator, east of the Graboon, and north of the Ogoway.They have progressed steadily from the East, and are crushing ^^^ ^^^^the feebler individuals in between them and the coast. They arerapidly increasing, their females becoming really fertile, which is attributed totheir marrying later than the women of the coast tribes. Their languageis a Bantu a single, even though with quite a few peculiarities. They have beensaid to belong to the exact same stock physically as the Niam-Niam, havingalso several of the very same customs, like cannibalism. The males

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FAN BARGAINING FOR A BRIDE. are soldiers and hunters, muscular and lean, proud and self-confident.Their lips are comparatively thin, and the jaws are not as prominent asin most negroes. The girls perform all drudgery and household operate,and are quite ugly following youth. In each sexes the forehead is veryrounded above the eyebrows. Individual ornament is significantly valued. Tattoo-ing, painting, necklaces, feathers, cowry-shells, are significantly in vogue.Copper rings round the calves remind one particular of East African tribes. Somewomen are so heavily loaded with ornaments that they can’t walk. I

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Image from page 676 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants getting a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the fantastic continents and principal islands” (1888)

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

A couple of good Warrior Tattoos pictures I discovered:

Image from page 676 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants getting a common account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the great continents and principal islands” (1888)
Warrior Tattoos

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Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a well-liked account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the excellent continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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^ round tlie neck, in addition to several pounds of brass wire for arm and^^^^^^*°^^

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leg ornaments. The warriors and young guys wore their hair in fourseparate plaits, two of which overhung the forehead. Two lines arevery typically tattooed on the forehead. The Babwende, nonetheless lower I 664 THE INHABITANTS OF AFRICA. down, have a curious habit. Whilst visiting Stanley with gifts, andhaving seated themselves for a chat, they suddenly started grindingtheir teeth, as although in a mad rage. We should reluctantly restrict our accounts of the African tribes, andnot even mention many tribes described by different explorers. They are,even so, as but but little identified scientifically. When they are morethoroughly compared collectively, they wall be identified to fall into a fewimportant groups, whose customs can be classified and compared. Tillthen, it is wearisome and bewildering to study of the vast numbers ofsavage tribes currently made identified, unless in the pages of some greatexplorer like Livingstone or Stanley. We have to briefly refer to the folks of the Zanzibar district, where the Mahometans are

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Asajj Ventress
Warrior Tattoos

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Asajj Ventress is a fictional character from the Star Wars Expanded Universe. She is Anakin Skywalker’s arch nemesis in the course of the initial season. She is named following the character Asaji from Akira Kurosawa’s Throne of Blood. Ventress is a Dark Jedi, and one of Count Dooku’s Force-attuned apprentices and assassins. She is a strong warrior with exceptional combat abilities, and desires most of all to join the Sith order and destroy the Jedi. She has many distinctive Sith tattoos and wields dual curved red lightsabers. Her lightsabers can attach with each other at the hilt, forming a double bladed weapon with a curve in the middle.

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