Posts Tagged ‘customs’

Image from page 131 of “The Victoria Nyanza the land, the races and their customs, with specimens of some of the dialects” (1899)

Friday, April 22nd, 2016

Some cool Cartoon Tattoos pictures:

Image from web page 131 of “The Victoria Nyanza the land, the races and their customs, with specimens of some of the dialects” (1899)
Cartoon Tattoos

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Identifier: victorianyanzala00koll
Title: The Victoria Nyanza the land, the races and their customs, with specimens of some of the dialects
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Kollmann, Paul, b. 1865 Nesbitt, H. A. (Henry Arthur)
Subjects: Ethnology
Publisher: London : S. Sonnenschein &amp Co., ltd.
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
Digitizing Sponsor: Web Archive

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ide remains uncovered. Among the women ofthe Watussi I saw big tanned ox-hides fromwhich the hair had been scraped, and which had been then smeared with black with these they covered the whole physique. Walking in this dress usually seemed somewhat awkward, asthe females could onlytake quick actions. Theraw hides are stretchedout on the ground bymeans of a quantity of small wooden pegs, and then scraped for additional use.I discovered no standard musical instruments in Ussindja, but there was a peculiar sort of whistle employed for signal-ling. Forthese the Wassindja make wooden tubes of distinct lengths, enveloped in ba-nana leaves and threads of banana bast. They are held vertically in the mouth, and give forth shrill / notes. A wooden tube, with the skin of an Signal- animalswhistles, tail drawnover it, serves as a particular whistle for war-signalling a long feather is place in it as daua. A smaller whistleis tied up with this, and I saw the two used occa-sionally for a war-dance (Figs. 155 and 156). A man

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Fig. 152.—Tattooing of a Man of Ussindja. USSINDfA 117 seized hold of a shield and spear, and tied more than hisface a whimsical mask (Fig. 157, p. 119). This con-sisted of apiece of brownox-skin, withholes for eyesand mouth.Over thecrown a stripof zebra manestood uprightas an orna-ment, and wasfastened bystring to themask. Twoostrich-feathers rose from the temples. The dancer marched forwards with shield in front(with a step like the goose-step of our recruits), and then

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Image from web page 73 of “An account of the manners and customs of the modern day Egyptians, written in Egypt in the course of the years 1833-1835” (1842)

Saturday, October 25th, 2014

A couple of nice Clover Tattoos pictures I located:

Image from web page 73 of “An account of the manners and customs of the modern Egyptians, written in Egypt throughout the years 1833-1835” (1842)
Clover Tattoos

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Identifier: accountofmanners00laneuoft
Title: An account of the manners and customs of the modern day Egyptians, written in Egypt throughout the years 1833-1835
Year: 1842 (1840s)
Authors: Lane, Edward William, 1801-1876
Subjects: Egypt — Social life and customs Egypt — History 19th century
Publisher: London, Ward, Lock and co.

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a custom somewhat equivalent tothat above described : it consists in generating indelible marks of ablue or greenish hue upon the face and other parts, or, at least,upon the front of the chin, and upon the back of the proper hand,and often also upon the left hand, the correct arm, or each arms,the feet, the middle of the bosom, and the forehead : the mostcommon of these marks made upon the chin and hands are hererepresented. The operation is performed with many needles(typically seven) tied with each other : with these the skin is pricked inthe desired pattern : some smoke-black (of wood or oil), mixedwith milk from the breast of a lady, is then rubbed in andabout a week right after, before the skin has healed, a paste of thepounded fresh leaves of white beet or clover is apj^licd, and givesa blue or greenish colour to the marks: or, to create the sameeffect in a far more simple manner, some indigo is rubbed into the 34 THE Modern day EGYPTIANS. punctures, alternatively of the smoke-black, and so forth. It is generally per-

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A TATTOOED GIRL. % m WW II ( srECIMKNS OF TATTOOING ON THE CHIN.

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Image from page 101 of “The land and the Book or, Biblical illustrations drawn from the manners and customs, the scenes and scenery of the Holy Land” (1874)
Clover Tattoos

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Identifier: landbookorbibli01thom
Title: The land and the Book or, Biblical illustrations drawn from the manners and customs, the scenes and scenery of the Holy Land
Year: 1874 (1870s)
Authors: Thomson, William McClure, 1806-1894
Subjects: Bible Bible
Publisher: New York, Harper

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t that which gives such a blue tinge to their lips ? Yes and these marks on the forehead, chin, breast, arms,hands, and feet, are all different patterns and figures of thismost ancient art. The impact is any thing but agreeable toour taste. All Orientals, nevertheless, have a passion for it.Moses either instituted some such custom, or appropriatedone already current to a religious purpose. He says. Andthou shalt show thy son in that day, saying, this is carried out be-result in of that which the Lord did unto me when I cameforth out of Egypt and it shall be for a sign unto thee uponthy hand, and for a memorial in between thine eyes (or 16th)for a token upon thy hand, and for frontlets amongst thineeyes.^ This practice of marking religious tokens upon thehands and arms is almost univeisal among the Arabs, of allsects and classes. Christian pilgrims to Jerusalem have theoperation performed there, as the most holv spot identified to ■ Hub. ii. 11. » Gen. i. 19. Exod. xiii. 9 and 16. THE LAND AND THE BOOK.

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6rE(IMEN:J OK TATTOOING. their religion. T have watclied the method of imprintmgthem, and it is not a little painful. A number of needlesare bound tightly collectively in the shape of the preferred fig-ure, or so that the figure can be marked out by them. Theskin being punctured in the required pattern, particular mix-tures of coloring matter are rubbed in, and the place bound TATTOOING—FRONTLETS. 93 with a tight bandage. Gunpowder, variously prepared, isvery generally employed, and it is that which gives to thetattooing of these Bedawin its bluish tinge. Mr. Lane tellsus that in Egypt smoke-black mixed with the milk of awoman is utilized, and subsequently a paste of fresh-poundedleaves of clover, or white beet, is applied, so as to give agreenish blue colour to the marks. It is properly ascertainedthat this tattooing prevailed in Egypt even before the timeof Moses. If he appropriated it to sacred purposes, thepatterns may possibly have been so devised as to commemorate thedeliverance of the youngsters of Israe

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Image from page 132 of “The Victoria Nyanza the land, the races and their customs, with specimens of some of the dialects” (1899)

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

Some cool Cross Tattoos photos:

Image from web page 132 of “The Victoria Nyanza the land, the races and their customs, with specimens of some of the dialects” (1899)
Cross Tattoos

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Identifier: victorianyanzala00koll
Title: The Victoria Nyanza the land, the races and their customs, with specimens of some of the dialects
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Kollmann, Paul, b. 1865 Nesbitt, H. A. (Henry Arthur)
Subjects: Ethnology
Publisher: London : S. Sonnenschein &amp Co., ltd.

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Tattooing of a Man of Uha.-

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bro k e Fig. 154.—Tattooing of a Man of Ussui. WarUance. into a leaping dance,flourishing hisshield and spearas if in battle.Very cleverly heturned a somer-sault, thenquickly sank onhis knee, placedhis shield beforehim for protec- tion, and dashed his spear in the face of a supposedenemy. Now and then he whistled with either the longor the short whistle hanging from his neck. Unfortu- The figures consist of projecting rolls with small incisions crossing them,and getting the appearance of fastenings for the rolls. n8 VICTORIA XYANZA I nately, the dance was interrupted in a somewhat violentway, for the man trod upon a piece of broken glass inhis dance, and wounded himself severely. The young males of Ussindja also execute other dances with each other. They make a excellent circle, in the middle Dances. f ,. ? , of which stands a musician tolead the singing. This leader plays an_ ordinary Swahili instrument with sounding§&gt bottom board of gourd, and sings in a nasalj tone, the folks in the circ

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Image from web page 279 of “The palaces of Crete and their builders” (1907)
Cross Tattoos

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Identifier: palacesofcreteth00moss
Title: The palaces of Crete and their builders
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Mosso, A. (Angelo), 1846-1910
Subjects: Palaces
Publisher: London, Unwin

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e sameprotuberances at the base of the trunk, and are thus differentiatedfrom the forms of European races as we know them.i If we evaluate these statuettes with the later archaic Greekwork, e.g., the popular discoveries on the Acropolis of Athens, weshall see how the Greek ideal of beauty changed. Surely theconception of female charms before the bronze epoch was very In my function, Idoli feminili c figure di animali nell eta neoHtica (Memorie dclla R. Accademia delle scienzc di Torino, 1907), I publish femaleidols discovered in Italy comparable to those of Crete. 269 two/ PALACES OF CRETE AND THEIR BUILDERS distinct from later ideals, and the early artist evidently ex-aggerated reality in order to emphasise the profile of the form,and render it pleasing to primitive man. A modest cross on thehip of the statuette suggests tattooing, and this proves that theCretans passed, as all nations did, through that stage of barbarismin which tattooing and scars on the skin have been a distinction and anornament.

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Image from page 93 of “Women of all nations, a record of their characteristics, habits, manners, customs and influence” (1908)

Monday, September 22nd, 2014

A couple of nice Conventional Tattoos pictures I discovered:

Image from page 93 of “Women of all nations, a record of their qualities, habits, manners, customs and influence” (1908)
Traditional Tattoos

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Identifier: womenofallnation01joyc
Title: Females of all nations, a record of their qualities, habits, manners, customs and influence
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Joyce, Thomas Athol, 1878-1942 Thomas, Northcote Whitridge, 1868-
Subjects: Women
Publisher: London, New York [etc.] : Cassell and Organization, limited

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•J .v„„ A CHIEF AND HIS WIFE,The latter being of the curly-haired kind. girl if she belongs to a household of highposition, she must be tattooed and sincetatooing is an important ceremony,Tattoo. ^^^ performed in a peculiar man-ner in this nation, it deserves a specialparagraph to itself. In the rest of Poly-nesia, as in other nations inhabited by acomparatively fair-skinned individuals, a numberof small punctures have been produced in the skmand the colouring matter rubbed in butin New Zealand the approach was far much more 74 Girls OF ALL NATIONS painful : typical grooves have been cut bymeans of an instrument pointed with boneand shaped like a diminutive adze, whichwas struck with a modest mallet. The bloodflowed freely, and was wiped off with a

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Photograph by Mnir &amp■ Moodie.^ Duntdin Standard MAORI Lady OF High RANK. Showing talloo on chin. Note the feathers in the hair. tuft of flax, the pattern being indicated bydark lines drawn on the skin. Following this thedark pigment, in the kind of powder, wasapplied. Girls were tattooed on the lips andchin, as shown in the above illustration,and sometimes on the thighs and breastalso. Though the procedure was far lesssevere in their case than in that of the guys,the operation was productive of a greatdeal of suffering and inflammation. Thesubject was regarded as below a heavytapu, and the function was accompanied bynumerous incantations in the case ofthe daughter of an critical chief, aslave was at times sacrificed. The pat-tern of the tattoo was standard and thevarious lines had been cut in a definite order,every group getting identified by a particularname. The education of the girl was left mainlyin the hands of her mother, but there was oneoccupation which partook of aArf ^^^^ sacred nat

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thug life
Traditional Tattoos

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great tattoos contrast with conventional pose

Image from web page 420 of “Ladies of all nations, a record of their traits, habits, manners, customs and influence” (1908)

Thursday, September 18th, 2014

Some cool Fire Tattoos pictures:

Image from page 420 of “Ladies of all nations, a record of their qualities, habits, manners, customs and influence” (1908)
Fire Tattoos

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Identifier: womenofallnation01joyc
Title: Ladies of all nations, a record of their traits, habits, manners, customs and influence
Year: 1908 (1900s)
Authors: Joyce, Thomas Athol, 1878-1942 Thomas, Northcote Whitridge, 1868-
Subjects: Girls
Publisher: London, New York [and so on.] : Cassell and Business, restricted

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der years by theirmothers, and typically painted and hung withornaments. Amongst the Macusi and other tribes amothers first care is to paint her kid.Yuri ladies devote hours in this occupa-tion then the elder young children perform thetoilette of mother and grandmother, and who had a nonetheless much more impatient customerto deal with—an ape which was even moreunwilling to allow the elaborate pattern tobe painted on his face. Every reproof whichthe mother addressed to her son was re-peated ten instances by the daughter before thetask was comprehensive, and a handful of rows of beadscould be hung round the creatures neck. Girls soon begin to aid their mothers the smallest can peel cassava roots, watch a pot on the fire, or collect fire-GirlsDuties ^^ood. Among the Yuri the males go off fishing or hunting, and this isthe mothers chance for educating thechildren. Then the girls find out how to nethammocks, spin cotton, make pottery, andso on. Cultivation of the fields and cook-ing the kids can discover of themselves.

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ALACALUF Ladies IN EUROPEAN COSTUME.This tribe dwells on the Coast of the Straits of Magellan. not till then do they believe of breakfast.The Passe mother pierces her daughtersear, and starts the painfuloperation of tattooing for her,as the father does for a boy.Schomburgk once saw acharming scene prior to a Warrau festival.A mother was painting an impatientyoungster, who could not stand nonetheless fora moment. Beside her sat a pretty child Ornamenta-tion ofChildren. In death, as in life, the wife has equalrights baskets and sieves arc burnt onher grave, pots are broken andcast into the forest and thusnothing remains to provoke thedead to return and punish theliving for neglect or meanness. Neitherwidower nor widow may marry tiU a jearis past but lamentation for the dead ismainly the business of the females. Death and Burial Customs. 382 Women OF ALL NATIONS The Macusi widower should mourn someten or eleven months—that is, till themanioc field of his initial wife providesthe raw material for

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Image from web page 131 of “History of the United States from the discovery of the American continent ..” (1858)
Fire Tattoos

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Identifier: historyofunited12banc
Title: History of the United States from the discovery of the American continent ..
Year: 1858 (1850s)
Authors: Bancroft, George, 1800-1891
Subjects: United States — History Colonial influence United States — History Revolution, 1775-1783
Publisher: Boston, Tiny, Brown and Co.

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d, he still refusedto hear of peace, and struck dead the warrior whoproposed it. At length, soon after the absence of a year,he resolved, as it were, to meet his destiny andreturned to the lovely land where have been the gravesof his forefathers, the cradle of his infancy, and theAug. nestling-location of his tribe. When he escaped narrowly,leaving his wife and only son as prisoners. My heartbreaks, cried the tattooed chieftain, in the agony ofhis grief now I am ready to die. His own follow-ers began to plot against him, to make much better terms forthemselves, and in a handful of days he was shot by a faithlessIndian. The captive orphan was transported. So per-ished the princes of the Pokanokets. Sad to them hadbeen their acquaintance with civilization. The iirst shipthat came on their coast, kidnapped males of their kin-dred and now the harmless boy, that had been cher-ished as an only youngster, and the future sachem of theirtribes, the last of the household of Massasoit, was sold into a I I I THE ^iPUBLIC I

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KING PHILIPS WAR. 109 bondage, to toil as a slave ^ under the suns of Bermuda, chap XII. Of the once prosperous Narragansetts, of old the chief -^—tribe of New England, hardly one hundred guys re- l^&gt76mained. The sword, fire, famine, and sickness, hadswept them from the earth. Throughout the entire w^ar, the Mohegans remainedfaithful to the English and not a drop of blood wasshed on the content soil of Connecticut. So significantly thegreater was the loss in the adjacent colonies. Twelveor thirteen towns have been destroyed the disbursementsand losses equalled in worth half a million of dollars—anenormous sum for the handful of of that day. A lot more than sixhundred guys, chiefly young males, the flower of thecountry, of whom any mother might have been proud,perished in the field. As numerous as six hundred houseswere burned. Of the in a position-bodied males in the colony,1 in tw^enty had fallen and 1 household in twentyhad been burnt out. The loss of lives and propertywas, in proportion to numbers, as distressing as in t

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Image from web page 73 of “An account of the manners and customs of the contemporary Egyptians, written in Egypt during the years 1833-1835” (1842)

Friday, August 29th, 2014

Some cool Bear Tattoos pictures:

Image from web page 73 of “An account of the manners and customs of the modern Egyptians, written in Egypt throughout the years 1833-1835” (1842)
Bear Tattoos

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Identifier: accountofmanners00laneuoft
Title: An account of the manners and customs of the modern Egyptians, written in Egypt in the course of the years 1833-1835
Year: 1842 (1840s)
Authors: Lane, Edward William, 1801-1876
Subjects: Egypt — Social life and customs Egypt — History 19th century
Publisher: London, Ward, Lock and co.

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A TATTOOED GIRL. % m WW II ( srECIMKNS OF TATTOOING ON THE CHIN.

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TATTOOED HANDS AND FOOT. formed at the age of about five or six years, and by gipsy-girls.Tiie term applied to it is dakk. Most of the females of the DJ?ESS. 35 greater components of Upper Egypt, who are of a extremely crark complexion,tattoo their lips instead of the parts above-talked about ] therefore con-verting their organic colour to a dull, bluish hue, which, to theeye of a stranger, is really displeasing.^ An additional characteristic of the Egyptian girls that need to behere described is their upright carriage and gait. This is mostremarkable in the female peasantry, owing, doubtless, in a greatmeasure, to their habit of bearing a heavy earthen water-vessel,and other burthens, upon the head. The dress of the ladies of the middle and greater orders ishandsome and sophisticated. Their shirt is extremely complete, like that of themen—but rather shorter—reaching not quite to the knees : it isalso, typically, of the very same kind of material as the mens shirt, or ofcoloured crape—sometimes black, A pair of extremely wide t

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Image from page 674 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants being a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the fantastic continents and principal islands” (1888)
Bear Tattoos

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Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a well-liked account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the fantastic continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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length of theavenue. In the centre is a platform, of tampedclay, with a heavy tree-trunk sunk into it, and in thebeen scooped out a number of troughs, so that severalpound grain at once. The homes are separated into two or a lot more apartments and on account of the compact nature of the clay and tampedfloor are simply kept clean. The roofs are shiny with the reek ofsmoke, as even though they had been painted with coal-tar. The householdchattels or furnishings are restricted to meals-baskets, earthenware pots, anassortment of wicker-operate dishes, the loved ones shield, spears, knives,swords, and tools, and the fish-baskets lying outside. They are tolerablyhospitable, and permit strangers the free of charge use of their dwellings. Thebananas and plantains are very luxuriant, whilst the Guinea palms supplythe individuals with oil and wine the forests give them fuel, the rivers fish,and the gardens cassava, ground-nuts, and Indian corn. The chiefsenact strict laws, and although possessed of but small actual power, either

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MANYEMA GIRL. wood havewomen could 662 THE INHABITANTS OF AFRICA. of wealth or retinue, precise the utmost deference, and are exceedinglyceremonious, becoming constantly followed by a drummer, who taps his drumwith masterly talent. At Rubunga, about the most northerly point reached by the Congo,the natives dress their hair in tufts on the back of the head, fastenedNatives of with iron hair-pins. Tattooing is carried to excess, everyRubunga portion of the skin bearing punctured marks, from the roots ofthe hair down to the knees. Their breasts are like hieroglyphic parch-ment charts, marked with raised figures, ledges, squares, circles, wavylines, tuberose knots, rosettes, and each conceivable design and style. No colour-ing substance had been introduced into these incisions and punctures the cuticle had basically been tortured and irritated by the injectionof some irritants or air. Indeed, some of the glossy tubercles, whichcontained air, were as massive as hens eggs. As numerous as six thin ledgesmarked the foreh

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