Posts Tagged ‘everyone’

In New York, everyone has a cell phone

Thursday, May 21st, 2015

A few nice Music Tattoos images I found:

In New York, everyone has a cell phone
Music Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This photo was taken near the corner of Sixth Avenue and West 4th Street, in Greenwich Village.

***************

This set of photos is based on a very simple concept: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing vanything, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the first of these "every-block" photos, I will have taken more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the "every-block" photos, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the small subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I think is "great," and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, "I have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s really a terrific picture!"

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, "This is New York!" to anyone who looks at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion; but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a "local" viewer say, "Well, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from another part of the country, or another part of the world, I know that that’s New York!" And there might be some photos where a "non-local" viewer might say, "I had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular."

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photos about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Little by little, store by store, day by day, things change … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it’s even more amazing to go back and look at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, "Was it really like that back then? Seriously, did people really wear bell-bottom jeans?"

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade yet). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, "This is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11".

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image; I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll ultimately decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon; and even though I’m definitely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, "Did we really wear shirts like that? Did women really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?"

Another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago; and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that makes it very easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help wondering whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise details of each day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each day, and the most recent part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about places that I should definitely visit to get some good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

New York women have the most amazing shoes
Music Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken on Christopher Street, between 7th Ave and Gay Street, in Greenwich Village …

Note: I chose this as my "photo of the day" for Oct 29, 2014.

***************

This set of photos is based on a very simple concept: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the first of these "every-block" photos, I will have taken more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the "every-block" photos, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the small subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I think is "great," and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, "I have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s really a terrific picture!"

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, "This is New York!" to anyone who looks at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion; but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a "local" viewer say, "Well, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from another part of the country, or another part of the world, I know that that’s New York!" And there might be some photos where a "non-local" viewer might say, "I had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular."

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photos about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Little by little, store by store, day by day, things change … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it’s even more amazing to go back and look at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, "Was it really like that back then? Seriously, did people really wear bell-bottom jeans?"

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade yet). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, "This is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11".

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image; I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll ultimately decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon; and even though I’m definitely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, "Did we really wear shirts like that? Did women really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?"

Another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago; and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that makes it very easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help wondering whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise details of each day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each day, and the most recent part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about places that I should definitely visit to get some good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

In New York, every person appears at absolutely everyone … including the actors on the side of a bus

Friday, March 13th, 2015

Some cool Eye Tattoos images:

In New York, everybody looks at everyone … which includes the actors on the side of a bus
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken at the north end of Verdi Square, i.e., at the corner of 73rd Street and Broadway. For photographers like me, it really is a excellent men and women-watching spot: you can sit comfortably on 1 of the stone benches in Verdi Square, watching folks stroll down Broadway and deciding no matter whether they are photo-worthy as they get close enough to really snap their picture. Indeed, sometimes they cross the street and stroll correct previous you, and you can be busily snapping dozens of photos of them, while they chat happily with every other and ignore you totally.

You can also watch folks cross from the west side (of Broadway, off to the left) or the east side (from Amsterdam Avenue, which is a little off the correct-side frame of this photo), presenting themselves for a short couple of seconds in front of the enormous granite stones of the old Central Savings Bank (which was turned into an pricey coop apartment constructing a couple of years ago). And occasionally they, also, make a sharp southward turn, to stroll previous you on their way into the 72nd Street subway station instantly behind where this photo was taken.

**************************************

This set of images is based on a very easy concept: walk each block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what occurs. To keep away from missing something, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be a lot more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s much more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, a lot more adventurous photographers.

Oh, in fact, there’s one particular a lot more modest detail: leave the images alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I really focus on the first of these &quotevery-block&quot images, I will have taken much more than eight,000 photos on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus one more many thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the a variety of spots in NYC where I traditionally take pictures. So I never anticipate to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot photos, and hope that I’ll be in a position to make an objective choice of the ones worth hunting at.

As for the criteria that I’ve utilized to choose the small subset of each and every-block pictures that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. Initial, I’ll upload any photo that I believe is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-buddies will be, &quotI have no thought when or where that photo was taken, but it really is actually a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third includes time. I’m hoping that I will take some images that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anybody who appears at it. Naturally, specific landscape icons like the Empire State Developing or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I will uncover other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be capable to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to someone from one more component of the nation, or one more component of the world, I know that that is New York!&quot And there might be some images exactly where a &quotnon-nearby&quot viewer might say, &quotI had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so intriguing/lovely/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I keep in mind wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing numerous shops, stores, restaurants, and enterprise establishments — and then casually searching at the photographs about five years later, and being stunned by how considerably had changed. Little by little, store by retailer, day by day, things adjust … and when you’ve been about as extended as I have, it’s even more wonderful to go back and appear at the images you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask your self, &quotWas it genuinely like that back then? Seriously, did individuals genuinely wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I’ll be searching at these each and every-block photographs five or ten years from now (and possibly you will be, too), I’m going to be undertaking my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they have been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade but). Or maybe they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial example of such a time-certain image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I do not know if I will eventually decide that they are worth uploading. Women’s fashion/types are an additional clear example of a time-certain phenomenon and even though I’m absolutely not a style specialist, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some photos ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we actually wear shirts like that? Did ladies truly put on those weird skirts that are brief in the front, and lengthy in the back? Did every person in New York have a tattoo?&quot

An additional instance: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that every person has 1, which undoubtedly wasn’t correct a decade ago and it seems that every person walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious focus riveted on this tiny box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that might be going on (amongst other factors, that tends to make it really easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I cannot assist questioning whether this type of social behavior will appear bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have grow to be so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted straight into our eyeballs.

Oh, 1 last thing: I’ve designed a customized Google Map to show the precise specifics of every day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each day, and the most current portion of my each-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each and every day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL hyperlink to Ed’s each and every-block progress by way of Manhattan

If you have any ideas about areas that I ought to definitely check out to get some excellent images, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your small corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Keep tuned as the photo-stroll continues, block by block …

0426_003
Eye Tattoos

Image by cajsa.lilliehook
Photography by Cajsa Lilliehook
for It really is Only Style
Retailer information at Blogging Second Life
****Shopping LIST******
Poses: EverGlow
Skin: [PXL] FAITH NAT NE MEB C1
Tattoos: [PXL] FAITH NAT Cherry Lips
[PXL] FAITH NAT Betty Eyes
Eyes: [UMEBOSHI] Eon eyes Duo Green (med)
Lashes: Lelutka
Mani/Pedi: SLink Mesh Hands &amp Feet with FLAIR mani applier
Hair: *ARGRACE* Fedora Hat &quotWild curl&quot ~ (Copper)
Clothing:
/artilleri/ Abby prime (jacket layer) *yellow*
Legal Insanity – stefani slim pants groovy black
Leverocci – Sleek Blazer_M_Nero
Footwear: Ingenue :: Lily Flats (Slink Feet Add-On) :: Ruby
Jewelry: Balderdash – Whiskey and Sunlight
Place: Metropolis City maps.secondlife.com/secondlife/Metropolis%20City/26/138/1731

Dinshaw sings “The Boxer” at Pier 45
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
I spent Sunday afternoon down at Pier 45 in Greenwich Village, mainly to photograph the tango dancers out at the finish of the pier. But I got there early (as I constantly appear to do), so I wandered around to a few other locations, such as the Hudson River Cafe at the foot of the pier — exactly where men and women have been enjoying a glass of cold beer in the dazzling vibrant sunshine…

There was a guy named Dinshaw playing the guitar over in a corner, so I located a quiet spot and did my best to record a couple of of his songs. He says he’s got an email list, but I do not know its address yet … and he does not have a web site however, so I can’t give you any specifics on how to track him down. But as you’ll hear him clarify on a single of the other videos I’ve uploaded, he plays at this spot on Thursdays and Sundays … almost certainly by means of the remainder of the summer time, and maybe as long as the climate stays good.

Dinshaw might not be Paul Simon or Art Garfunkel, and the video is probably beneath-exposed for the first minute or two. But I nonetheless feel it’s a good rendition of “The Boxer,” and I consider you’ll like it.

***************

This set of photographs is primarily based on a really simple notion: walk each and every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, walk both sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be far more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s far more than I am willing to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one particular more little detail: leave the images alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I truly focus on the very first of these &quotevery-block&quot photos, I will have taken more than eight,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus one more many thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the different spots in NYC where I traditionally take images. So I don’t anticipate to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot photos, and hope that I’ll be capable to make an objective selection of the ones worth hunting at.

As for the criteria that I’ve utilized to pick the little subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. 1st, I will upload any photo that I think is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-pals will be, &quotI have no notion when or where that photo was taken, but it’s genuinely a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with spot, and the third includes time. I’m hoping that I will take some photographs that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anybody who looks at it. Certainly, particular landscape icons like the Empire State Constructing or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I’ll locate other, much more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be capable to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to someone from another portion of the country, or yet another part of the planet, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there may be some photographs where a &quotnon-neighborhood&quot viewer might say, &quotI had no notion that there was anyplace in New York City that was so exciting/stunning/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering about my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, retailers, restaurants, and company establishments — and then casually searching at the photos about five years later, and getting stunned by how much had changed. Tiny by small, shop by shop, day by day, things adjust … and when you’ve been about as lengthy as I have, it is even much more incredible to go back and look at the pictures you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask oneself, &quotWas it truly like that back then? Seriously, did folks actually put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be hunting at these each-block photos 5 or ten years from now (and perhaps you will be, also), I am going to be undertaking my very best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they had been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade but). Or maybe they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years right after 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-particular image I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I will ultimately determine that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/types are one more obvious instance of a time-distinct phenomenon and even although I’m definitely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be capable to look at some photos ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we truly wear shirts like that? Did ladies really put on these weird skirts that are quick in the front, and extended in the back? Did everybody in New York have a tattoo?&quot

Another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that folks have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everybody has 1, which definitely wasn’t accurate a decade ago and it seems that every person walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious focus riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that may well be going on (among other issues, that makes it extremely easy for me to photograph them with no their even noticing, especially if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I cannot help asking yourself regardless of whether this type of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … specially if our cellphones have turn out to be so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted straight into our eyeballs.

Oh, a single final point: I’ve designed a customized Google Map to show the precise specifics of every day’s photo-stroll. I will be updating it each and every day, and the most current element of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each and every day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s each and every-block progress by means of Manhattan

If you have any recommendations about areas that I need to absolutely check out to get some excellent images, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your small corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e-mail me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Keep tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

my love for Buddhism and compassion on my forearm for everyone to see. can’t wipe’em off so…

Monday, November 4th, 2013

Some cool Love Tattoos images:

my love for Buddhism and compassion on my forearm for absolutely everyone to see. can’t wipe’em off so…
Love Tattoos

Image by Bellah
it’s upside down, but i was attempting to take a picture of my own proper forearm. very visible tattoos that i got a decade ago…what are ya gonna do?!? i can either fret and try to cover them up or embrace them as portion of me. i am my past present AND future! i also have a gorgeous lotus on upper appropriate arm and a Bowie knife on proper ankle- got it when i was 19 to represent my really like for David Bowie. He name dhimself after the Bowie knife. His wife Iman has a Bowie knife on her ankle also! i had mine first! Oh and I still really like David Bowie 15 years later!

i love mom
Love Tattoos

Image by StageJournal
from christmas evening. cool tatto and a million stars

Find My Tattoo
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