Posts Tagged ‘monument’

Image from page 172 of “Unveiling and dedication of monument to Hood’s Texas brigade on the capitol grounds at Austin, Texas, Thursday, October twenty-seven, nineteen hundred and ten, and minutes of the thirty-ninth annual reunion of Hood’s Texas brigade

Thursday, December 4th, 2014

A few nice Eagle Tattoos pictures I discovered:

Image from web page 172 of “Unveiling and dedication of monument to Hood’s Texas brigade on the capitol grounds at Austin, Texas, Thursday, October twenty-seven, nineteen hundred and ten, and minutes of the thirty-ninth annual reunion of Hood’s Texas brigade
Eagle Tattoos

Image by Internet Archive Book Pictures
Identifier: unveilingdedicat02chil
Title: Unveiling and dedication of monument to Hood’s Texas brigade on the capitol grounds at Austin, Texas, Thursday, October twenty-seven, nineteen hundred and ten, and minutes of the thirty-ninth annual reunion of Hood’s Texas brigade association held in Senate chamber at Austin, Texas, October twenty-six and twenty-seven, nineteen hundred and ten, with each other with a short monument and brigade association history and Confederate scrap book..
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Chilton, Frank B., 1845- comp
Subjects: Confederate States of America. Army. Texas Brigade Confederate States of America. Army. Texas Infantry Regiment, 1st Confederate States of America. Army. Texas Infantry Regiment, 4th Confederate States of America. Army. Texas Infantry Regiment, 5th Hood’s Texas Brigade Association United States — History Civil War, 1861-1865 Regimental histories
Publisher: Houston, Tex., F. B. Chilton

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Pictures From Book

Click right here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Just before Image:
males, pushed aside by the jugger-naut wheel of commerce, nearly forgotten inthe busy din of mart and industry spot, grownchary of telling the undimmed experiences ofthe dead years, they yet find auditors in theirgrandchildren, blue-eyed lads and bonnie littlegirls, who climb upon the gnarled old knees tohear about Stonewall Jackson in the valley, andLee in the Wilderness, and the fighting at Mil-likens Bend, and the siege of Vicksburg. andthe charge of the males that followed Pickett upCemetery Eidge at Gettysburg—and thus thereis kept alive in young hearts the traditions ofthe courage and the valor of the Southland, andthe glorious pride of race and nation andachievement and adore of the South blazes likea holy flame in the little hearts and kindlesa never ever-dying altar fire of patriotism. The circle is complete when the chubby armsof babyhood are clasped around the neck ofgrandpa and when the brave blue eyes of boy-hood kindle at his stories. There is now no tramp, tramp, tramp of boys

Text Appearing Soon after Image:
jMAJOR GEORGE W. LITTLEFIELD TERRYS TEXAS RANGERS. President American National Bank, Austin, Texas. Regent University of Texas. Honorary Comrade of Hoods Texas Brigade. Member Hoods Texas Brigade Monument Committee. ARMY, NORTHERN VIRGINIA 147 marching there are measures that are heavy andslow, and the tattoo of the cane on the cementsidewalk is not like the rattle of the snartdrums, and the dull copper luster of the bit ofbronze medallion worn in the lapel is not likethe glory of the gold and the gray but thatscrap of metal signifies a lot more than the jeweledpendant or such orders as are the present of kings it signifies more than the red ribbon of the Le-gion of Honor it means far more than the yellowtrinket of the Golden Fleece or the ebon enamelof the Black Eagle of Prussia, for it marks themen who made such a fight that all the worldwondered, and for four long years held aloft bythe sheer force of the bayonet and the sworda cause that was as hopeless as it was glorious. LINCOLN-GRANT REPRESENTED A

Note About Photos
Please note that these pictures are extracted from scanned page photos that might have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not completely resemble the original perform.

Image from web page 178 of “Unveiling and dedication of monument to Hood’s Texas brigade on the capitol grounds at Austin, Texas, Thursday, October twenty-seven, nineteen hundred and ten, and minutes of the thirty-ninth annual reunion of Hood’s Texas brigade
Eagle Tattoos

Image by World wide web Archive Book Pictures
Identifier: unveilingdedicat01chil
Title: Unveiling and dedication of monument to Hood’s Texas brigade on the capitol grounds at Austin, Texas, Thursday, October twenty-seven, nineteen hundred and ten, and minutes of the thirty-ninth annual reunion of Hood’s Texas brigade association held in Senate chamber at Austin, Texas, October twenty-six and twenty-seven, nineteen hundred and ten, collectively with a short monument and brigade association history and Confederate scrap book..
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Chilton, Frank B., 1845- comp
Subjects: Confederate States of America. Army. Texas Brigade Confederate States of America. Army. Texas Infantry Regiment, 1st Confederate States of America. Army. Texas Infantry Regiment, 4th Confederate States of America. Army. Texas Infantry Regiment, 5th Hood’s Texas Brigade Association United States — History Civil War, 1861-1865 Regimental histories
Publisher: Houston, Tex., F. B. Chilton

View Book Web page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Photos: All Pictures From Book

Click right here to view book on-line to see this illustration in context in a browseable on the web version of this book.

Text Appearing Just before Image:
,liOK cinivc^K W. LlTTLEFltLD ihRRVS ii.XAS RANGERS. President Amc Monal Bank, Austin, T:-!:. Re- nt rni-.ef^itr of Texas. Honorary Comrade of H^

Text Appearing Right after Image:
-LJOR GEORGE . LITTLEFIELD TERRYS TEXAS RANGERS. President American National Bank, Austin, Texas. Regent University of Texas. Honorary Comrade of Hoods Texas Brigade. Member Hoods Texas Brigade Monument Committee. ARMY, NORTHERN VIRGINIA 147 marching there are steps that are heavy andslow, and the tattoo of the cane on the cementsidewalk is not like the rattle of the snartdrums, and the dull copper luster of the bit ofbronze medallion worn in the lapel is not likethe glory of the gold and the gray but thatscrap of metal indicates far more than the jeweledpendant or such orders as are the gift of kings it indicates more than the red ribbon of the Le-gion of Honor it indicates far more than the yellowtrinket of the Golden Fleece or the ebon enamelof the Black Eagle of Prussia, for it marks themen who made such a fight that all the worldwondered, and for 4 long years held aloft bythe sheer force of the bayonet and the sworda lead to that was as hopeless as it was glorious. LINCOLN-GRANT REPRESENT

Note About Pictures
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned web page pictures that may possibly have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may possibly not perfectly resemble the original perform.

Most New Yorkers recognize this monument

Thursday, May 1st, 2014

A handful of nice Eye Tattoos images I identified:

Most New Yorkers recognize this monument
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This photo of the Soldiers and Sailors monument was taken at the corner of Riverside Drive and 88th Street.

Wikipedia tells us that the Soldiers and Sailors monument was initial recommended in 1869, but tiny was carried out to in fact produce it until 1893. — at which time the New York State legislature established a Board of Commissioners for a monument to the soldiers and sailors who had served in the Union Army for the duration of the Civil War. Initially set to be built at 59th Street and Fifth Avenue then at Mount Tom (83rd Street &amp Riverside Drive), the project was delayed for several years since many organizations in the city could not agree on a website for the monument.

Ground was broken for the monument on September 21, 1900, and the first stone was laid in January 1901. On the cornerstone was an inscription saying that the monument was erected by the citizens of New York — at what turned out to be a cost of ,000. It was ultimately devoted on Memorial Day, 1902 with Governor Theodore Roosevelt officiating (i.e., when he was governor of the state of New York, and just before his subsequent election to President). Throughout the dedication, the monument was unveiled following a parade of Civil War veterans up Riverside Drive. The memorial bears the simple inscription: &quotTo the memory of the brave soldiers and sailors who saved the Union&quot.

If you are interested, you can discover far more specifics right here on Wikipedia:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Soldiers’_and_Sailors’_Monument_(Manhattan)

***************

This set of photographs is primarily based on a quite easy notion: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing something, stroll both sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be much more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I am prepared to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, a lot more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one particular far more little detail: leave the pictures alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I really focus on the first of these &quotevery-block&quot photos, I will have taken a lot more than 8,000 photos on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another a number of thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the numerous spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t anticipate to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot photos, and hope that I’ll be capable to make an objective choice of the ones worth hunting at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the little subset of every-block photographs that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. Very first, I will upload any photo that I consider is &quotgreat,&quot and exactly where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-pals will be, &quotI have no concept when or where that photo was taken, but it’s actually a terrific image!&quot

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third requires time. I am hoping that I will take some photos that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anyone who looks at it. Clearly, specific landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I am hoping that I will locate other, far more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that’s not recognizable to an individual from one more component of the country, or an additional element of the planet, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there might be some images exactly where a &quotnon-regional&quot viewer may well say, &quotI had no thought that there was anyplace in New York City that was so intriguing/beautiful/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I bear in mind wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing a variety of shops, shops, restaurants, and organization establishments — and then casually searching at the images about 5 years later, and being stunned by how considerably had changed. Tiny by small, store by store, day by day, things modify … and when you have been around as long as I have, it really is even much more incredible to go back and look at the pictures you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, &quotWas it actually like that back then? Seriously, did individuals really put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I’ll be hunting at these every single-block images five or ten years from now (and perhaps you will be, too), I am going to be performing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no concept what we’re calling this decade yet). Or possibly they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years soon after 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial instance of such a time-distinct image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I do not know if I will eventually make a decision that they are worth uploading. Women’s style/types are yet another obvious example of a time-distinct phenomenon and even though I’m certainly not a style professional, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some photos ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we genuinely put on shirts like that? Did ladies really wear these weird skirts that are quick in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

One more example: I am fascinated by the interactions that men and women have with their cellphones out on the street. It appears that everybody has one particular, which definitely wasn’t correct a decade ago and it appears that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious consideration riveted on this tiny box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that may be going on (amongst other things, that makes it quite effortless for me to photograph them with no their even noticing, especially if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I can not assist wondering whether this sort of social behavior will look bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have turn into so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted straight into our eyeballs.

Oh, a single last point: I’ve designed a customized Google Map to show the precise details of every day’s photo-stroll. I’ll be updating it every day, and the most current portion of my each-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this hyperlink

URL hyperlink to Ed’s each-block progress via Manhattan

If you have any recommendations about areas that I ought to definitely check out to get some good photographs, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your small corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e-mail me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-stroll continues, block by block …

New Yorkers no longer bear in mind (or care) who “Ray” was
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This photo was taken on Columbus Ave, near the corner of 83rd St.

Wikipedia tell us, &quotRalph Cuomo opened the initial Ray’s Pizza, at 27 Prince Street in Little Italy, in 1959, named following his nickname &quotRaffie&quot. In the 1960s he briefly owned a second Ray’s Pizza, but sold it to Rosolino Mangano in 1964. Mangano kept the name and later falsely claimed that his was the initial. In 1973, Mario Di Rienzo named his new pizzeria Ray’s Pizza (which is now closed) after, he claimed, the nickname for his loved ones in Italy. Also that year, Joseph Bari purchased a pizzeria from Mangano and renamed it, and several others, as Ray Bari Pizza. By 1991, dozens of pizzerias in New York City had &quotRay’s&quot in their name, as well as those in other American states and Teheran, Iran.

&quotIn 1981, Gary Esposito purchased a pizzeria from Mangano. Soon after opening several far more &quotOriginal Ray’s&quot restaurants, he partnered with Cuomo and Mangano to combine independent &quotRay’s&quot restaurants into an official franchise chain.

&quotAs of 2011 there have been at least 49 restaurants by some variant of that name in the New York City telephone directory,[four] like one particular named Not Ray’s Pizza.

&quotThe first Ray’s Pizza closed its doors on Sunday, October 30, 2011, following a legal dispute more than rent and a lease that followed its owner’s death in 2008. It has given that reopened as The Famous Roio’s Pizza.&quot

For a lot more specifics, see

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ray’s_Pizza

***************

This set of pictures is based on a extremely straightforward concept: walk each and every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what takes place. To steer clear of missing anything, stroll each sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that is far more than I’m prepared to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, a lot more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there is one a lot more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the very first of these &quotevery-block&quot images, I will have taken far more than 8,000 photos on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another numerous thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the numerous spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take photos. So I do not count on to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot photos, and hope that I’ll be in a position to make an objective choice of the ones worth hunting at.

As for the criteria that I’ve employed to pick the little subset of each and every-block pictures that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I will upload any photo that I believe is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, &quotI have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s genuinely a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with spot, and the third includes time. I’m hoping that I will take some pictures that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to any person who appears at it. Clearly, specific landscape icons like the Empire State Constructing or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I am hoping that I’ll locate other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be capable to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to an individual from one more portion of the nation, or one more portion of the globe, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there may possibly be some photographs exactly where a &quotnon-nearby&quot viewer may say, &quotI had no notion that there was anyplace in New York City that was so intriguing/lovely/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I keep in mind wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing numerous shops, shops, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually hunting at the images about 5 years later, and becoming stunned by how a lot had changed. Little by little, store by retailer, day by day, factors modify … and when you have been around as long as I have, it really is even far more wonderful to go back and look at the images you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask oneself, &quotWas it actually like that back then? Seriously, did individuals actually wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be hunting at these each-block photos 5 or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I am going to be performing my greatest to capture scenes that convey the sense that they have been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no thought what we’re calling this decade yet). Or perhaps they’ll just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years soon after 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial instance of such a time-specific image I’ve already taken a bunch, and I do not know if I’ll eventually decide that they are worth uploading. Women’s fashion/designs are another apparent example of a time-particular phenomenon and even although I’m undoubtedly not a style specialist, I suspected that I will be in a position to appear at some photos ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we truly put on shirts like that? Did women truly wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and extended in the back? Did absolutely everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

An additional instance: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everybody has one particular, which certainly wasn’t correct a decade ago and it seems that every person walks down the street with their eyes and their whole conscious consideration riveted on this small box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that may possibly be going on (amongst other issues, that makes it quite easy for me to photograph them with out their even noticing, especially if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I can’t aid asking yourself regardless of whether this kind of social behavior will appear bizarre a decade from now … particularly if our cellphones have turn into so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted straight into our eyeballs.

Oh, one particular final thing: I’ve designed a customized Google Map to show the precise information of each and every day’s photo-walk. I will be updating it each and every day, and the most current part of my each and every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each and every day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s each and every-block progress by means of Manhattan

If you have any recommendations about areas that I should certainly check out to get some great photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your tiny corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e-mail me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Remain tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

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