Posts Tagged ‘Nicholas’

Image from page 562 of “St. Nicholas [serial]” (1873)

Wednesday, October 29th, 2014

Some cool Frog Tattoos pictures:

Image from page 562 of “St. Nicholas [serial]” (1873)
Frog Tattoos

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Identifier: stnicholasserial271dodg
Title: St. Nicholas [serial]
Year: 1873 (1870s)
Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905
Subjects: Children’s literature
Publisher: [New York : Scribner &amp Co.]

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hingsto claim your attention that you hardly knewwhere to appear to ideal benefit. A single friendwould exclaim, Just appear at that! whilst an-other was saying, Oh, look there! Of course you kept quite busy hunting, forthere have been a lot of exciting things, and youdid nt want to miss any. In many respects so it is with the natureprocession. In January and February, whilewe knew it was coming, we gave but littleactive attention to it, because we have been especiallyoccupied with the interests of these months.In March were observed a few of the advance-guards. The owl had laid its eggs, the budshad swollen prepared for opening, the skunk-cabbage had pushed its queer hood upthrough the old leaves on the ground in theswamp, and the mobses had been greener frommany rains. The phcebe, the red-wingedblackbird, the song-sparrow, the bluebird, andother birds of early spring, had returned to usfrom the South. The woodchuck and the chip-munk have awakened from the winters sleep. 1900.] NATURE AND SCIENCE FOR YOUNG People. 549

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The most fascinating components of the procession aresoon to be passing, and how a lot of factors thereare to be observed! None of us is far more satisfied and expectant thanthe downy woodpecker, that has been with usall winter. Like a noisy boy that gets an old tin pan or pail, andbeats on it, sothis interestingbird need to ex-press his joy bydrumming. Rat-a-tat, tat-a-tat,tat-a-tat-at-tat-ta-t-t-t-t-t till hishead vibrates sofast that thespace above hisbody shows onlya hazy series ofheads, and themusic is like therolling tattoo ofthe snare-drum, NEST IN DEAD BRANCH OF WHITE BIRCH. „.-..! 1, „ rm _ • -Component Reduce OFF TO SHOW THE EGGS. O.IIU IId.IIIlUIlIZ.Cb with the crackle-crack, crackle-kr-r-r-r-r-r of the springtime cho-rus of the frogs down in the near-by marshes.This is the music of the downy woodpecker onsome favourite old dry limb. When in a even though hestops to say peek, peek, and then con-tinues in a manner that shows he enjoys his mu-sic, and wishes us to. And so we will. He notonly tends to make his spr

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Image from web page 532 of “St. Nicholas [serial]” (1873)

Friday, September 5th, 2014

Verify out these Bear Tattoos photos:

Image from page 532 of “St. Nicholas [serial]” (1873)
Bear Tattoos

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Identifier: stnicholasserial351dodg
Title: St. Nicholas [serial]
Year: 1873 (1870s)
Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905
Subjects: Children’s literature
Publisher: [New York : Scribner &amp Co.]

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s that hadpricked him, jumped into theold mans location, and, liftinghis oar, said, I will pull forSeaman McCue for one hun-dred years. Mac has never ever uttered oneword of thanks. Certainly, heshowed much the same dis-position he did on the morning of Admiral Mc-Nairs initial inspection. Coming upon him in theranks, the admiral mentioned: Properly, Seaman McCue, Ithink it about time we old fellows need to be ex-cused from duty. But I feel the act of Youngentered into his heart, for, though there waslittle perceptible change in his general bearing, Ithink he went oftener to church, and I am surehe responded more willingly to the boys entreatyfor a sea yarn. Of Purdy? He have to have been a giant whenVol. XXXV.-52-53. he manned the guns of the Kearsarge, but to-dayhe is bent at the waist, and the surfs of time havewhitened him even as they have his shipmate. Ones first sight of Purdy is startling, for inthe middle of a high forehead there gleams abright, blue star, visible and outward sign of thestar sang.

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Copyright, 1907, by Enrique Muller.SIGNAL PRACTICE ON THE OLYMPIA. Right after the victory more than the Alabama, twenty ofthe Kearsarge crew in solemn covenant sworethey would by no means desert the navy even though UncleSam had a plank afloat, and to render the vowbinding they each and every consented to be tattooed in amanner that would unfit them for any other sta-tion in life. Purdy is the only member of thegang I have observed. I recognize there are five orsix of them nevertheless on the sea. These men are not only living relics of a greatbattle they are animated encyclopedia of the 410 Three YEARS BEHIND THE GUNS [Mar., navy, hunting with little favor on contemporary war-fare, jumping at an chance to refer to thegood old instances when they had iron males and reign to my personal fancy, and in its flight I recog-nized in the black-ringed gull upon the foretruckthe reincarnation of the boatswain of the Kear-sarge, and in the whis-

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Image from page 74 of “The dawn of civilization: Egypt and Chaldaea” (1897)
Bear Tattoos

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Identifier: dawnofcivilizati01masp
Title: The dawn of civilization: Egypt and Chaldaea
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Maspero, G. (Gaston), 1846-1916
Subjects: Civilization
Publisher: London : S.P.C.K.

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ol. xiv. pp. 321, 322). eight It is the panthers skin which is sccd, among other folks, on the shoulders of the negro prisonersof the XVIIIth dynasty (Wilkinson, Manners and Customs, 2nd edit., vol. i. p. 259, No. 13 c, d)it was obligatory for specific orders of priests, or for dignitaries performing priestly functions of aprescribed nature (Statues A 60, 6G, 72, 76, in the Louvre, E. de Rougé, Notice sommaire desMonuments de la Galène Égyptienne, 1872, pp. 44, 36, 38, 39 Lepsids, Denlcm., ii. 18, 19, 21, 22, 30,31 b, 32, etc. cf. Wilkinson, Manners and Customs, 2nd edit., vol. i. pp. 181, 182 Erman, JEgypten,p. 286). The sacerdotal costume is here, as in numerous other circumstances, a survival of the ancient attire ofthe head of the loved ones, or of a noble in complete dress. These who inherited or who had obtained theright of wearing the panthers skin on particular occasions, bore, under the ancient empire, the title ofOirû basit, chiefs of the fur (Mariette, Les Matiabas, pp. 252, 253, 254, 275, and so on.).

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NEGRO PR1SONEIIS WEARING THE PANTHERS SKIN AS ALOIN-CLOTH.two 54 THE NILE AND EGYPT. the body, the animals tail touching the heels behind,1 as we see later in severalrepresentations of the negroes of the Upper Nile. I am inclined to feel thatat 1st they smeared their limbs with grease or oil,2 and that they tattooed theirfaces and bodies, at least in portion, but this practice was only retained by thelower classes.3 On the other hand, the custom of painting the face was nevergiven up. To full their toilet, it was needed to accentuate the archof the eyebrow with a line of kohl (antimony powder). A equivalent black linesurrounded and prolonged the oval of the eye to the middle of the temple,a layer of green coloured the below lid,four and ochre and carmine enlivened thetints of the cheeks and lips.5 The hair, plaited, curled, oiled, and plasteredwith grease, formed an erection which was as difficult in the case of theman as in that of the lady. Must the hair be too brief, a black or

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Image from page 53 of “St. Nicholas [serial]” (1873)

Friday, August 15th, 2014

A few nice Reduced back Tattoos pictures I located:

Image from web page 53 of “St. Nicholas [serial]” (1873)
Lower back Tattoos

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Identifier: stnicholasserial31dodg
Title: St. Nicholas [serial]
Year: 1873 (1870s)
Authors: Dodge, Mary Mapes, 1830-1905
Subjects: Children’s literature
Publisher: [New York : Scribner &amp Co.]

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is tu-whoo, That the birds must come At the pheasants drum, And the woodpeckers tat-tattoo, His echoing, loud tattoo. From the four winds of heaven, As the summoning notes rang clear, They flew to a wood Exactly where a great oak stood, And a titmouse whistled, Right here, here ! Whistled and shouted, Right here! The bluebird sang full soft and low,And trembled with delight,Till 1 bird shouted,Whip-poor-will!And another named Bob White T was the partridge named Bob White. The robin sang with all his may possibly,But the jay-bird shrieked his jeersSaid the sea-mew, This will not do,But the redbird mentioned, Three cheers, three cheers! But the redbird said, Three cheers! The catbird ventured an olio,In phrase and rhythm neatSaid a bird in blue, Omit the mew, But the sparrow thought it sweetIts words had been Sweet, sweet, sweet! The thrush sang a hymn so tenderlyThat it thrilled the listening skiesHear the judges nowFrom every single bough : Give the bonny brown thrush the prize,Give the bonny brown thrush the prize!

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Few hundred yearsago,in a nation called Ger-numerous, there was a villageknown as Grosshufelten,which was on a lake. Thelake is so small that I have=sT forgotten its name, and you willI not find the village on any mapof the country,— which is nonetheless named Germany,—unless it is on the back, exactly where I did nt appear.The individuals in this village were tremendously an-noyed by a robber baron who dwelt on amountain near by, and who was in the habit oflevying tribute on them since he did nt liketo work. The last time that he told them theymust spend what he known as their annual dues, theyrefused to do so. The baron was significantly sur-prised,— as people are generally surprised whenothers refuse to do issues that they have beenin the habit of carrying out no matter whether they ought to ornot, — and he resolved to punish the villagers.At initial he thought of descending on themwith his band and burning their houses butthis would have essential effort, so he changedhis mind and called before him two magicianswhom he kept to d

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Image from page 237 of “A guide to the birds of New England and eastern New York containing a crucial for every season and brief descriptions of over 250 species, with distinct reference to their appearance in the field” (1904)
Lower back Tattoos

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Identifier: guidetobirdsofn00hoff
Title: A guide to the birds of New England and eastern New York containing a essential for every season and short descriptions of over 250 species, with distinct reference to their look in the field
Year: 1904 (1900s)
Authors: Hoffmann, Ralph, 1870-1932
Subjects: Birds Birds
Publisher: Boston New York Houghton, Mifflin and organization

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t, then risingby means of two or three far more strokes. Most of the Wood-peckers feed on the larvae of borers which they extract fromthe trunks or limbs of trees they are, therefore, permanentresidents. The Sapsucker, nonetheless, and Flicker are notadapted to feed on borers, and are as a result migrants. 216 BIRDS OF NEW ENGLAND AND EASTERN NEW YORK Northern Flicker Golden-winged Woodpecker. Colcvptes auratiis luteus 12.00 Ad. $ . — Head grayish-brown, a scarlet baud across nape ofneck back brown, barred with black wings and tail black shafts and below sides of icings and tail-feathers golden-yellowrump white throat pinkish-brown line along side of throat andband across upper breast black rest of beneath parts buffy,marked with round black spots. Ad. 9 • — Equivalent, but withoutthe black line along the side of the throat. Nest^ in a hole in a dead limb. Eggs, white. Near the sea-coast, from Massachusetts southward, and inthe decrease Hudson Valley, the Flicker is not uncommon in

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Fig. 65. Northern Flicker winter. In the rest of New England it is only a summerresident, common everywhere except in the northernheavily-forested regions. The migrants return in March orApril, and are then really noisy their loud wick ivickwick wick is 1 of the characteristic sounds of a brightspring morning. This is usually the cry of the male only,who also delivers at this season a tattoo on a resonant limb,which may frequently be heard in the pauses of the loud get in touch with. NORTHERN FLICKER 217 The ordinary contact-note of the Flicker is a higher-pitchedti-err, frequently confused by newbies with the tee7^ of theBlue Jay. The Flickers note is sharper, less prolonged,and has a marked downward inflection it is, moreover,typically provided but as soon as, or repeated only soon after a small in-terval, whereas the Jay normally screams two or threetimes in swift succession. When two or more birds come collectively, the males spreadwings and tail, bowing and turning, whilst each sexes uttera note, like the syllables

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