Posts Tagged ‘races’

Image from page 131 of “The Victoria Nyanza the land, the races and their customs, with specimens of some of the dialects” (1899)

Friday, April 22nd, 2016

Some cool Cartoon Tattoos pictures:

Image from web page 131 of “The Victoria Nyanza the land, the races and their customs, with specimens of some of the dialects” (1899)
Cartoon Tattoos

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Identifier: victorianyanzala00koll
Title: The Victoria Nyanza the land, the races and their customs, with specimens of some of the dialects
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Kollmann, Paul, b. 1865 Nesbitt, H. A. (Henry Arthur)
Subjects: Ethnology
Publisher: London : S. Sonnenschein &amp Co., ltd.
Contributing Library: University of California Libraries
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ide remains uncovered. Among the women ofthe Watussi I saw big tanned ox-hides fromwhich the hair had been scraped, and which had been then smeared with black with these they covered the whole physique. Walking in this dress usually seemed somewhat awkward, asthe females could onlytake quick actions. Theraw hides are stretchedout on the ground bymeans of a quantity of small wooden pegs, and then scraped for additional use.I discovered no standard musical instruments in Ussindja, but there was a peculiar sort of whistle employed for signal-ling. Forthese the Wassindja make wooden tubes of distinct lengths, enveloped in ba-nana leaves and threads of banana bast. They are held vertically in the mouth, and give forth shrill / notes. A wooden tube, with the skin of an Signal- animalswhistles, tail drawnover it, serves as a particular whistle for war-signalling a long feather is place in it as daua. A smaller whistleis tied up with this, and I saw the two used occa-sionally for a war-dance (Figs. 155 and 156). A man

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Fig. 152.—Tattooing of a Man of Ussindja. USSINDfA 117 seized hold of a shield and spear, and tied more than hisface a whimsical mask (Fig. 157, p. 119). This con-sisted of apiece of brownox-skin, withholes for eyesand mouth.Over thecrown a stripof zebra manestood uprightas an orna-ment, and wasfastened bystring to themask. Twoostrich-feathers rose from the temples. The dancer marched forwards with shield in front(with a step like the goose-step of our recruits), and then

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Image from web page 416 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a common account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the wonderful continents and principal islands” (1888)

Tuesday, October 28th, 2014

Verify out these Pin up Tattoos photos:

Image from web page 416 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants being a common account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the wonderful continents and principal islands” (1888)
Pin up Tattoos

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Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants getting a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the fantastic continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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llow tinge of the Chinaman. They have extended, black,rather thin beards, at times plaited. All the folks, of each sexes,have a space shaven on the crown of the head and the rest of the longhair is gathered up and twisted into a knot over the bald spot, andtransfixed with two peculiar pins, the metal of which varies with rank.The females have the backs of their hands tattooed. The expression ofthe folks is virtually always gentle and pleasing, although somewhat sad. Napha-kiang, the seat of government, is peculiar in structure, thehouses being constructed in tiny enclosures, separated from the street andone yet another by huge limestone walls from eight to fourteen feethigh but in other respects it is like a Japanese town. The climateis practically tropical, though the chief vegetation is of a temperate charac-ter. Rice, wheat, and sweet-potatoes are the principal crops and tobaccois largely grown. A far more pleased and laughter-loving men and women, says arecent visitor. Dr. Guillemard, can scarcely be identified.

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Image from page 132 of “The Victoria Nyanza the land, the races and their customs, with specimens of some of the dialects” (1899)

Thursday, October 9th, 2014

Some cool Cross Tattoos photos:

Image from web page 132 of “The Victoria Nyanza the land, the races and their customs, with specimens of some of the dialects” (1899)
Cross Tattoos

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Identifier: victorianyanzala00koll
Title: The Victoria Nyanza the land, the races and their customs, with specimens of some of the dialects
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Kollmann, Paul, b. 1865 Nesbitt, H. A. (Henry Arthur)
Subjects: Ethnology
Publisher: London : S. Sonnenschein &amp Co., ltd.

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Tattooing of a Man of Uha.-

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bro k e Fig. 154.—Tattooing of a Man of Ussui. WarUance. into a leaping dance,flourishing hisshield and spearas if in battle.Very cleverly heturned a somer-sault, thenquickly sank onhis knee, placedhis shield beforehim for protec- tion, and dashed his spear in the face of a supposedenemy. Now and then he whistled with either the longor the short whistle hanging from his neck. Unfortu- The figures consist of projecting rolls with small incisions crossing them,and getting the appearance of fastenings for the rolls. n8 VICTORIA XYANZA I nately, the dance was interrupted in a somewhat violentway, for the man trod upon a piece of broken glass inhis dance, and wounded himself severely. The young males of Ussindja also execute other dances with each other. They make a excellent circle, in the middle Dances. f ,. ? , of which stands a musician tolead the singing. This leader plays an_ ordinary Swahili instrument with sounding§&gt bottom board of gourd, and sings in a nasalj tone, the folks in the circ

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Image from web page 279 of “The palaces of Crete and their builders” (1907)
Cross Tattoos

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Identifier: palacesofcreteth00moss
Title: The palaces of Crete and their builders
Year: 1907 (1900s)
Authors: Mosso, A. (Angelo), 1846-1910
Subjects: Palaces
Publisher: London, Unwin

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e sameprotuberances at the base of the trunk, and are thus differentiatedfrom the forms of European races as we know them.i If we evaluate these statuettes with the later archaic Greekwork, e.g., the popular discoveries on the Acropolis of Athens, weshall see how the Greek ideal of beauty changed. Surely theconception of female charms before the bronze epoch was very In my function, Idoli feminili c figure di animali nell eta neoHtica (Memorie dclla R. Accademia delle scienzc di Torino, 1907), I publish femaleidols discovered in Italy comparable to those of Crete. 269 two/ PALACES OF CRETE AND THEIR BUILDERS distinct from later ideals, and the early artist evidently ex-aggerated reality in order to emphasise the profile of the form,and render it pleasing to primitive man. A modest cross on thehip of the statuette suggests tattooing, and this proves that theCretans passed, as all nations did, through that stage of barbarismin which tattooing and scars on the skin have been a distinction and anornament.

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Image from page 397 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants being a well-liked account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the excellent continents and principal islands” (1888)

Friday, September 26th, 2014

Some cool Animal Tattoos photos:

Image from web page 397 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants being a well-liked account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the fantastic continents and principal islands” (1888)
Animal Tattoos

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Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the wonderful continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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&gt0 lAillLV. CHAPTER XI. Japan compared with Wonderful Britain—Early history—The Mikado—Rise of the Shogxins—Mongolinvasion—Development of feudal system—The revolution of 1868—The new constitution-Early European visitors—Recent treaties with foreigners—Modern changes — Japanesephysical features—Mental capacity and character—Imitation of Europeans—The content des-patch—Japanese ladies—Muscular peasantry—Acrobats—Tattooing—Dress—The Mmono—Hair-dressing—The chignon—Powder and paint—Rough country dress—Wedding ceremonies—Delight in children Their obedience, great temper, and docUity —Schools—Teaching of girls—The public baths—Houses and furniture—Religion—The Ainos of Japan—Distinct fromMongol type—Hairiness —Physical character—Aino womens looks —Children —Clothing—JeweUery — Houses—Food — Sake — Curios — Hunting—Notions of religion—Marriage— Goodqualities—The Loo-choo islanders—Physical characters.

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al civilisation of western Europe. Xp YEN much more than China, Japan bespeaks and com maiids our interest. She occupies in severa respects a parallel position to Excellent Britain—as an Japan com- ^^^^1^1 i^ower, as obtaining developed to her pared with present condition by way of an elaborateGreat Britain. ,&gt -, ^ . , . , • ^ leudal sjstem, as obtaining excellent mineralwealth and manufacturing talent, as including theflower of the Mongoloid folks, and especiall} ashaving lately thrown off ancient traditions to avery massive extent, and adopted several functions of the 381 THE TAPANESE. 385 PM i|lil!|3ll|II11lllii|l|l!ll!IINIIIMJI

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Image from page 431 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a well-known account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the wonderful continents and principal islands” (1888)
Animal Tattoos

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Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants getting a well-liked account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the wonderful continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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a couple of obtaining guns.They consume raw flesh ofcarnivora, as effectively asother animals. ThejReligion and ^^e a lot more ormorals, i^ss Christ-ianised, but Shamanismhas far more power overthem, and they havenot completed a lot morethan borrow St. Nicholasfrom the Russians, as somany Siberian nativeshave completed. They onlyshow degradation ofmorals where corruptedby Russians they hatetheft and disturbances,and are each kind andgentle. If they aredirty, according to ourideas, they are Hke mostof the less civihsed andsome of the so-calledcivilised peoples. TheirMusical stringed mu-instruments. g^cal instru-ments are worthy ofnotice. 1 of them,the domhra, is boat-likeand has five strings.The Hungarian Mag-yars, it will be remem-bered, have just such aninstrument, the tomhora,in itself a effective con-firmation of the rela-tionship of the peoples.Their language too is.of all Finnish types, that which approaches most closely the Magyar.Their inordinate consumption of sphits appears probably soon to make an endof the Ostiaks.

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OSTIAK OF OBI BASIN. THE INHABITANTS OF SIBERIA. 419 The Voguls. The Voguls of the Ural ridges, who are closely allied in race to theOstiaks, probably represent the primitive stock from which the Magyarssprang. They are an undersized hunting individuals, not far more than five,000in quantity. With theirthick furs,says M. Rec-lus, the hoods deckedto right and left withanimals ears, they at adistance look like wildanimals but their coun-tenance is timid, evenfrightened. Theyshave off their hair andmoustaches. They haveconformed to the GreekChurch and been bap-tized, but they nonetheless havetheir loved ones totems,—bows and arrows, circles,and so forth.,—tattooed on theirheads, arms, and legs.Their tribes are veryisolated, decreased almostto families, and theyare but tiny united.Wives are left on veryslight provocation andinstances are identified ofthe hunter living soli-tary soon after such a divorce,with only his reindeerand his dog for com-pany. Their burials arevery simple a hole dugin the gTound when amember died su

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Image from page 324 of “Ridpath’s Universal history : an account of the origin, primitive situation and ethnic improvement of the great races of mankind, and of the principal events in the evolution and progress of the civilized life amongst males and nations

Monday, August 18th, 2014

A handful of good Polynesian Tattoos pictures I located:

Image from page 324 of “Ridpath’s Universal history : an account of the origin, primitive condition and ethnic development of the great races of mankind, and of the principal events in the evolution and progress of the civilized life among males and nations
Polynesian Tattoos

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Identifier: ridpathsuniversa08ridp
Title: Ridpath’s Universal history : an account of the origin, primitive situation and ethnic improvement of the great races of mankind, and of the principal events in the evolution and progress of the civilized life among guys and nations, from current and genuine sources with a preliminary inquiry on the time, place and manner of the starting
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Ridpath, John Clark, 1840-1900
Subjects: World history
Publisher: Cincinnati : Jones

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of collecting and work-ing into the desired forms. The nationalfashion demands that the heavy head offrizzed hair be ornamented as muchas feasible with feathers, leaves, andflowers. These are held in spot withbamboo combs. It is also the custom touse tattoo as a implies of bodily decoration.The breast and the back are scarified insuch way as to raise cicatrices in regularpatterns, and it has been noticed thatthe barbarians, given that the introduction ofEuropean figured goods, are Avilling toimitate the patterns of the very same in tat-tooing their bodies! The industries and arts of the Papuansextend to agricultural pursuits. On thisMalay influence side of their life thev alsoSfSS- recommend the Malays: Itins- is believed by these who have investigated the subject that therude agriculture of native New Guinea has been derived from Asiatic sources.This belief is strengthened by the factthat the Papuans, savage as they are,divide their lands, and hold them in themanner of individual house. Some of

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NATIVE OF MAFOR ISLAND—TYPE.Drawn by E. Mesples, from a photograph. these are cultivated with a lot more care thanwe need to expect at the hands of such apeople in such a country. The traveleron the north coast of New Guinea findshere and there a plantation with inclos-ures, and even terraces, that may nicely 734 Excellent RACES OE MANKIND. remind him of primitive Central Amer- jiea. Into such locations, however, savage Isuperstition nevertheless enters, and the Papuanhousehold, in case of the death of someof its members, is apt to abandon theplace, and to settle at a distance in theforest where no death has been. An additional item of the industrial liferelates to boats and boating. With re- the Brown Polynesians is noticed in theimproved navigation and the dispositionto trade. It might be conceded that piracy is onestage in the civilized life, or in the de-velopment of the civilized f£ r .-I 1 Piratical habits life, of the ocean peoples. ofthe Papuans. Undoubtedly the craft and the courage requisite for such busi

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Image from page 646 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants being a well-known account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the great continents and principal islands” (1888)

Thursday, August 14th, 2014

Some cool Western Tattoos pictures:

Image from web page 646 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants being a well-known account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the excellent continents and principal islands” (1888)
Western Tattoos

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Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a well-liked account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the fantastic continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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animals.Moreover, such animals as may provide meals are tabooed, elephant toone, monkey to an additional, crocodile to an additional but the craving for animalfood becomes uncontrollable at occasions, and accounts for considerably cannibalism.In late years these men and women have had the wit to adapt themselves to cir-cumstances, and turn out to be merchants and caniers for their Europeansuperiors. The Fans are in each and every way a more effective individuals, living just north THE WESTERN AFRICANS. 633 and south of the Equator, east of the Graboon, and north of the Ogoway.They have progressed steadily from the East, and are crushing ^^^ ^^^^the feebler individuals in between them and the coast. They arerapidly increasing, their females becoming really fertile, which is attributed totheir marrying later than the women of the coast tribes. Their languageis a Bantu a single, even though with quite a few peculiarities. They have beensaid to belong to the exact same stock physically as the Niam-Niam, havingalso several of the very same customs, like cannibalism. The males

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FAN BARGAINING FOR A BRIDE. are soldiers and hunters, muscular and lean, proud and self-confident.Their lips are comparatively thin, and the jaws are not as prominent asin most negroes. The girls perform all drudgery and household operate,and are quite ugly following youth. In each sexes the forehead is veryrounded above the eyebrows. Individual ornament is significantly valued. Tattoo-ing, painting, necklaces, feathers, cowry-shells, are significantly in vogue.Copper rings round the calves remind one particular of East African tribes. Somewomen are so heavily loaded with ornaments that they can’t walk. I

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Image from page 676 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants getting a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the fantastic continents and principal islands” (1888)

Thursday, August 7th, 2014

A couple of good Warrior Tattoos pictures I discovered:

Image from page 676 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants getting a common account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the great continents and principal islands” (1888)
Warrior Tattoos

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Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a well-liked account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the excellent continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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^ round tlie neck, in addition to several pounds of brass wire for arm and^^^^^^*°^^

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leg ornaments. The warriors and young guys wore their hair in fourseparate plaits, two of which overhung the forehead. Two lines arevery typically tattooed on the forehead. The Babwende, nonetheless lower I 664 THE INHABITANTS OF AFRICA. down, have a curious habit. Whilst visiting Stanley with gifts, andhaving seated themselves for a chat, they suddenly started grindingtheir teeth, as although in a mad rage. We should reluctantly restrict our accounts of the African tribes, andnot even mention many tribes described by different explorers. They are,even so, as but but little identified scientifically. When they are morethoroughly compared collectively, they wall be identified to fall into a fewimportant groups, whose customs can be classified and compared. Tillthen, it is wearisome and bewildering to study of the vast numbers ofsavage tribes currently made identified, unless in the pages of some greatexplorer like Livingstone or Stanley. We have to briefly refer to the folks of the Zanzibar district, where the Mahometans are

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Asajj Ventress
Warrior Tattoos

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Asajj Ventress is a fictional character from the Star Wars Expanded Universe. She is Anakin Skywalker’s arch nemesis in the course of the initial season. She is named following the character Asaji from Akira Kurosawa’s Throne of Blood. Ventress is a Dark Jedi, and one of Count Dooku’s Force-attuned apprentices and assassins. She is a strong warrior with exceptional combat abilities, and desires most of all to join the Sith order and destroy the Jedi. She has many distinctive Sith tattoos and wields dual curved red lightsabers. Her lightsabers can attach with each other at the hilt, forming a double bladed weapon with a curve in the middle.

Image from page 308 of “Ridpath’s Universal history : an account of the origin, primitive condition and ethnic improvement of the great races of mankind, and of the principal events in the evolution and progress of the civilized life among men and nations

Wednesday, August 6th, 2014

Check out these Western Tattoos photos:

Image from web page 308 of “Ridpath’s Universal history : an account of the origin, primitive situation and ethnic development of the great races of mankind, and of the principal events in the evolution and progress of the civilized life among guys and nations
Western Tattoos

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Identifier: ridpathsuniversa08ridp
Title: Ridpath’s Universal history : an account of the origin, primitive situation and ethnic development of the wonderful races of mankind, and of the principal events in the evolution and progress of the civilized life amongst males and nations, from current and genuine sources with a preliminary inquiry on the time, spot and manner of the starting
Year: 1897 (1890s)
Authors: Ridpath, John Clark, 1840-1900
Subjects: Planet history
Publisher: Cincinnati : Jones

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g of wood. Sometimesthev bind together 4 or 5 trunks ofthe mangrove tree, thus constructing arude raft, on which they take to thewater. On the western coasts no boatshave been seen in the hands of the na-tives, and the littoral islands are notvisited by the inhabitants if they lie outfurther to sea than males can swim.The East Australians use their boats infishing, and from this manner derive avery large proportion of their meals. A US TRA LI A NS. —A R TS. 717 In the other arts the Australians arebut tiny above the Hottentots. Pot-tery is unknown. They use as recepta-cles the skins of beasts, bladders, andleathern bags also a kind of basketwhich they frame with some small ability. The folks show a number of symptoms of gashes to heal as they could. The skinand subcutaneous tissue therefore cut 01scored with stone knives rises up inwelts, giving to those components of the bodyon which they are produced a horrid ap-pearance. The breast and the back areselected for scarification, and the period

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THE GRASSHOPPER HARVEST.—Drawn by Tofani, from a description. that rudimentary and abnormal pridewhich is one particular of the attributes of barba-rism. This is manifested in Manifestation of . pride manner of tattooing the physique | but the tattooing. r ,-, -, , use 01 the word tattoo ishardly correct as applied to the workwhich the Australians do upon them-selves. Such perform consists, as we haveseen, in creating scars in regularforms by the cutting of the surface ofthe physique and allowing the wounds and of coming to maturity as the time ofproducing this savage mutilation of theperson. We have spoken above of the relativeintellectual rank of these people. In afew particulars the facul- perceptive pow-ties of the thoughts are keen £^££5-and pretty rapid in action. ties-These qualities are observed in distinguish-ing one object from another, and in theexercise of such powers as lie nearest to 718 Great RACES OE MANKIND. the natural .senses. Time and once again, inthe preceding pages, we have observedthe abs

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Image from page 28 of “More than the trails of Glacier National Park” (1911)
Western Tattoos

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Identifier: overtrailsofglac00dill
Title: More than the trails of Glacier National Park
Year: 1911 (1910s)
Authors: Dillon, Tom
Subjects: Glacier National Park
Publisher: [St. Paul, Minn.] : [Fantastic Northern Railway]

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Looking Northeast from the Garden Wall, Glacier National Park GLACIER NATIONAL PARK 27 As soon as inside their dry shelter we ex-pressed our contempt for all kinds ofweather. The rain beat a vicious tattoo on theroofs that was only a staccato quickstepthat marched us all double-rapid toslumberland. The rattle on the roofgrew weaker soon after a time, and the moonpeeped out on the camp from a raggedbank of cloud, throwing a soft, silveryradiance over the scene. By means of thescreens the waterfalls could be seenfrisking down, ghostly white, while thepale-tipped pines murmured softly toeach other. The bell mares steadytinkle, as she grazed back and forth,ebbed and flowed in volume, waningfrom a harsh, brassy jangle to goldenmelody in the orchestral ensemble ofthe water, the woods and the wind,that merged into the dream vagariesthat pass lightly just before sleepmounts guard.

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—to gaze downward In silenced awe—he is9,000 feet above sea level. CHAPTER IV Gunsight Pass Hit the floor! Yet another day, damply fragrant, had rolled about, with the mounting sunfurbishing the western peaks in gold, orange and purple. The unpoetic scent ofnewly-fried bacon sifts through the trees, breaking in on esthetic musings. Break-quick more than, the climb for Gunsight Pass starts. Gunsight is a matter of 5 milesaway. A series of quick, swift scrambles up a thousand feet, and the timberline is passed. There are sudden plunges down into the stunted vegetation, andbreathless upward climbs. Amphitheaters, hollowed ages ago by the ice, areskirted on till one of these sudden turns brings Lake Louise, shimmering in all its shades of green, almost below the horses feet.On its surface lie the shadows of numerous mountains,and every tiny whisp of cloud that sails the skyis photographed in its depths. Seeking into itone sees a globe upside down, the reflection assoftly clear as the reality

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Image from page 934 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants being a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the fantastic continents and principal islands” (1888)

Tuesday, August 5th, 2014

Some cool Polynesian Tattoos photos:

Image from page 934 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a well-known account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the wonderful continents and principal islands” (1888)
Polynesian Tattoos

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Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants getting a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the great continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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ti, far the largestand most notable, with much more than half the inhabitants of the group,about 20,000. The charms of the latter island have been.usually celebrated.The individuals had been the most beautiful of Polynesians but they have muchdegenerated and are swiftly decreasing in numbers. The introductionof European manners, dress, and habits has been by no means an un-mixed benefit to them. The drink obtained from the orange is an in-toxicant they indulge in to excess. At present, though a queen nomin-ally exercises authority, the French have far more than after imprisonedher, and there is no doubt that the French genuinely govern. The capital ofTahiti, Papeete, now affords an amusing travesty of Paris, mixed witha Chinese quarter and its little population represents many nationalities.A huge farm, established by an English company and worked by Chineselabourers, produces a lot cotton, coffee, and sugar. A massive trade is doneat Papeete with the eastern islands and cocoanuts, cotton, and oranges are I

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HAWAIIAN L.U)y.921 922 THE INHABITANTS OF OCEANIA. the cliief exports. We need not say much more of the inhabitants of the Australand Low or Pearl Archipelagoes than that they are typical Pol3aiesians,expert pearl divers, and largely now Christians. The Marquesas, all volcanic, but much less fertile than the Society Islands,have developed perhaps the most handsome of all the Polynesians, ofThe Mar- pleasing yellow complexion with fresh ruddy cheeks, of veryquesans. symmetrical and normal attributes, hair varying from black toauburn, muscular and tall, and the guys much tattooed. From the firstvery hospitable to strangers, despite the fact that cannibals, and significantly offered towar among themselves, they had been open to new impressions and theiranimated natures located congenial spirits in the French. They havediminished swiftly given that they produced acquaintance with Europeans, andnow quantity only 5,000. In current times the majority have yielded toRoman Catholic missionaries. Penrhyns Island, 700 miles west of theMarquesas, ha

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Image from page 929 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants getting a well-liked account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the great continents and principal islands” (1888)
Polynesian Tattoos

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Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a well-liked account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the wonderful continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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in cloths and variously or-namented into these the spirits of thegods were believed periodically to enter.The priests held an crucial location inthe fulfilment of religious duties, avert-ing the anger of the gods, determiningthe taboo, and in a lot of instances super-intending human sacrifices. In manycases not only have been enemies supplied up,but households of the exact same tribe becamedevoted to sacrifice. Also usually there followed cannibal feasts and theHuman commonness of human bones as articles of furniture, andsacrifices. Jiuman hair as ornamentation for weapons of war, testifies tothe same disregard for human life, so lengthy as it did not belong to afriend. But we need not go into details, as these practices are to so largean extent done away with now. We can not regard the Polynesian^ asother than a religious men and women, thinking about how they prayed ahead of develop-ing homes, planting gardens, beginning a journey or voyage, eating food,and so forth., and presented thanksgivings in connection with manj events. That

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TATTOOED MABQUESAN CHIEF. thej^ believed in sorcery and witchcraft, and were relentless and savage I THE POLYNESIANS. 917

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Image from page 936 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants being a well-liked account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the excellent continents and principal islands” (1888)

Sunday, August 3rd, 2014

A couple of nice Polynesian Tattoos photos I identified:

Image from page 936 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants being a well-known account of the races and nations of mankind, previous and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the fantastic continents and principal islands” (1888)
Polynesian Tattoos

Image by World wide web Archive Book Images
Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the excellent continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
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es, have an industrious population, a huge part ofMicronesia. . jr jr 7 o x- whose meals is obtained by fishing. The Gilbert Islands arereally crowded with folks, who show a partial mixture of Polynesianwith darker races. In many respects their inhabitants are most interest-ing. The Caroline Islands have 30,000 brown Polynesian inhabitants,with extended curling hair and tall robust frames. The Pelew Islanders aredarker and shorter, almost certainly from Papuan and Malay admixture theyhave numerous good points, and an aristocratic organisation, with muchetiquette. The Ladrones are now inhabited by immigrants from thePhilippines and Carolines, the Spaniards getting exterminated the formerinhabitants. Ruins of much interest are located in some of these islands,as properly as in Pitcairn and Easter Islands, far to the east. The story ofthe Pitcairn islanders is nicely identified. Easter Island, now inhabited byfair Polynesians, has colossal remains of stone homes, photos, etc., show-ing the function of an unknown race.

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CHAPTEB V. Discovery and settlement of New Zealand—Government—Process and enterprise—Maori wars—Physical characters of Maoris—Origin—Dress—Tattooing—Hair-dressing—Dwellings—Mar-riage—Burial—Cannibalism and war—Religion—Language—Lament over a chief. NEW ZEALAND is anotlier group of largeislands occupied by a progressive British anda dimiiiisliing native stock. Tasman discoveredbut did not land in New Zealand, which jjigcovervwas 1st explored to any extent by andCaptain Cook in 1769. On his secondvoyage he introduced amongst the natives severalEuropean animals and plants, such as pigs, fowls,potatoes, turnips, and cabbages. He took formalpossession of the islands for George III. but theywere for many years tiny visited, owing to thehostility and the cannibalism of the natives.In 181-1 Christian missionaries settled in NewZealand, and in the course of thirty years they ^^ * ^*^ -^iffiL ^gkni^ jSSn^ ^?HuM V y^^JjM ^^^W L^^^P^ ^^pnL ^^fy^^^ ^ N. s^fcii^ip^^

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Image from page 938 of “The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants becoming a popular account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the excellent continents and principal islands” (1888)
Polynesian Tattoos

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Identifier: worldsinhabitant00bett
Title: The world’s inhabitants or, Mankind, animals, and plants getting a well-known account of the races and nations of mankind, past and present, and the animals and plants inhabiting the excellent continents and principal islands
Year: 1888 (1880s)
Authors: Bettany, G. T. (George Thomas), 1850-1891
Subjects: Civilization Culture
Publisher: London Ward, Lock

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About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Photos: All Photos From Book

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Text Appearing Ahead of Image:
also state that they identified a darker peopleon the islands when they arrived and asMelanesian functions are not infrequentamong them, this tradition also is to beaccepted as probable. Maori dress was comparatively simpleboth sexes wrapped round their loins a big mat woven of New Zealandflax, reaching as low as the knees or ankles. A second largewaterproof mat was thrown round the shoulders and descendedto the knees. There have been finer mantles for specific days but the favouritenational mode of decoration was tattooing, which was effectedwith a bone lancet, or with a toothed instrument. The colouringmatter was obtained by charring the resin of the Kauri pine. A com-plete tattooing took at least three months, and it may be added to atintervals. Women and low-class men and women have been but tiny, if at all, tattooed.The guys generally plucked out their beard. The hair wasgathered up on the head, tied, and fastened with a comb, anddecorated with black and white plumes. Young girls kept their hair

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CIVILISED MAOKI Lady. Dress. Tattooing. Hair dressing. 926 THE INHABITANTS OF OCEANIA. Dwellings. Marriage. rather brief that of married ladies hung loosely, decorated with shells,sharks teeth, and so on. The ear-lobes were pierced and decked with a greatvariety of objects,—stones, bones, feathers, flowers, and so on. New Zealand villages on the typical presented small improvementon the Polynesian kind, the huts getting low and small furnished. Thechiefs had significantly bigger and loftier dwellings, with centralcarved pillars. A lot of of the villages formed strongly fortified pahs on steep hills, and capable of safeguarding one particular or two thousand persons. Surrounded by triple dense pali-sadings of robust stakes, and by a ditch,they have been really challenging to capture. Thearrangement of the interior, with maga-zines, public shops, and so on., was complex andingenious. Marriage took place really early, girlsmarr^dng at ten or eleven years old. Therewas no purchase of wives, butthe consent of the parents hadto be obtained.

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