Posts Tagged ‘regions’

Image from web page 204 of “The lake regions of central Africa. A record of modern day discovery” (1881)

Tuesday, September 23rd, 2014

A couple of good Fire Tattoos pictures I located:

Image from page 204 of “The lake regions of central Africa. A record of contemporary discovery” (1881)
Fire Tattoos

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Identifier: lakeregionsofcen00gedd
Title: The lake regions of central Africa. A record of modern day discovery
Year: 1881 (1880s)
Authors: Geddie, John, 1848-1937
Subjects: Rivers — Africa Africa, Central — Description and travel
Publisher: London, New York [etc.] : T. Nelson and Sons

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d wastold that they had been remains of sokos, the trophies offormer feasts. He carried off two of the skulls, andpresented them to Professor Huxley, who declaredthat they have been negro craniums of the usual kind. Regardless of whether habitual cannibals or not, the Manyuemahave the most callous indifference for human sufTer-iii- and bloodshed and the slave-traders located itthe easiest task imaginable to set the tribes at eachothers throats. These ruffians getting gained com-plete ascendency with their fire-arms, sided firstwith 1 party and then with another, and when thecombatants had been suilicicntly weak they all fell aneasy prey. From his camp at Nyangwe Livingstonecounted at a single time ten and at one more seventeenvillages in flames at as soon as. The slavers depredationsculminated in a massacre of far more than ordinaryatrocity. One of the excellent institutions of the Manyuemacountry is their markets, held in particular villagesand at stated times. Even in war-time marketpeople are allowed to pass freely to and from the

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AX ARAB MASSACRE. 159 fairs with their wares. Individuals from distant dis-tricts collect right here, and exchange their surplus pro-ducts for Manyuema luxuries. Fish-wives, goat-herds, slave-owners dealers in ivory, palm oil,pottery, skins, cloth, and iron-ware sellers of fruit,vegetables, salt, grain, and fowls, all mingle in themotley throng, and shout the merits of their par-ticular goods at the best of their lungs, and witha perseverance and ardour that would make thefortune of an auctioneer at home. Strange varietiesof savage costume and no costume are to be observed inthese groups: the wild Balegga man-eater stalkingside by side with the white-skirted Moslem man-hunter from Zanzibar and the plumed, painted,tattooed, and bespangled chieftain laying his dignitytemporarily aside to chaffer with a poor commonerin his simple waistcloth, more than the price tag of a pig orof a mess of roasted white ants. At Nyangwe therewas a market after in each and every four days, and theassemblage usually numbered about 3

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Image from web page 201 of “The Victoria Nyanza the land, the races and their customs, with specimens of some of the dialects” (1899)
Fire Tattoos

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Identifier: victorianyanzala00koll
Title: The Victoria Nyanza the land, the races and their customs, with specimens of some of the dialects
Year: 1899 (1890s)
Authors: Kollmann, Paul, b. 1865 Nesbitt, H. A. (Henry Arthur)
Subjects: Ethnology
Publisher: London : S. Sonnenschein &amp Co., ltd.

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Fig. 277.—Ornament fr Calf of the Leg. (III. E., 5731, a, l&gt.)Fig. 292.—Rattle Girdle. (III. E., 5700.) ostrich-skin, to which the feathers nevertheless adhere. Fig. 281exhibits the style of wearing the hair as effectively as theornaments for neck and arms prevailing in Madjita Bay.In Ushashi and Ngoroine they tie round the hipsvarious sorts of narrow or broad leather girdles adornedwith cowrie-shells (Fig. 282), also leather straps withstrings of tablets produced from the shells of ostrich eggs(Fig. 283), or girdles of rattles (Fig. 284). I noticed 186 VICTORIA NYANZA many tools for everyday use suspended from a girdle madeof plaited strings of bast, and adorned with glass beadsand with spirals of brass wire. These tools have been : Thelower friction-board for creating fire, a tiny pocketmade of skin, and a modest needle-case for iron needles

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Fig. 278.—Head Ornament of Ostrich Feathers. (III. E., 5706.) (Fig. 285). Some Washashi carry in their hands fansmade of zebra-tail hair, as is done in Ussukuma. The hair of the head is shaven, except a roundtuft on the crown, which is allowed to stay Mode of .. … t . . , wearing the (Fig. 286, razor). I he hair is dyed with akind of red clay, and white horizontal strokesare painted across the forehead the little hairs of theeyelashes are pulled out with pincers. USHASHI AND KINDRED TRIBES OF THE MASSAI 187 Tattooing is practised occasionally, circumcision often,all more than Ushashi. The upper front-teeth receive a tri-angular shape, and the ear-lobes are greatlyenlarged, following the fashion of the Massai. Thebad yellow teeth of most of the Washashi struck me asspecially repulsive.

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Image from page 332 of “The polar and tropical worlds : a description of man and nature in the polar and equatorial regions of the globe” (1874)

Saturday, August 2nd, 2014

Some cool Religious Tattoos images:

Image from page 332 of “The polar and tropical worlds : a description of man and nature in the polar and equatorial regions of the globe” (1874)
Religious Tattoos

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Identifier: polartropicalwor00hartuoft
Title: The polar and tropical worlds : a description of man and nature in the polar and equatorial regions of the globe
Year: 1874 (1870s)
Authors: Hartwig, G. (Georg), 1813-1880 Guernsey, Alfred Hudson, 1824-1902
Subjects: Arctic peoples Natural history Antarctica Arctic regions Tropics
Publisher: Guelph, Ont. : J.W. Lyon

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e the ani-mals inside. Holding the spear firmly with 1 hand, he requires his tomahawkfrom his belt, dashes the home to pieces, and secures the inmates. Anotliermethod employed by the Indians to cajituie the niusquash is to block up thedifferent entrances to their tunnels, and then to intercept the animals as theytry to escape. At times the gun is employed, but not extremely often, as the mus-quash is so wary that it dives at the least alarm, and darts into one particular of its holes.The trap, nonetheless, is the ordinary signifies of destruction. The soft and glossyfur of the musquash, although worth no far more than from 6d. to Of?., is nevertheless a notinconsiderable post of trade, as no much less than half a million skins are aimuallyimported into England for hat-generating nor is there any worry of the musquashbeing extirpated, in spite of its numerous enemies, as it multiplies really quick, and isfound near every swamp or lake with grassy banks as far as the confines of thePolar Sea. § THE CREE INDIANS, OR EYTHINYUWUK:. 319

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HUNTING BISON IN THE SNOW. CHAPTER XXIX. THE CREE INDIANS, OR EYTHINYUWUK, Th3 numerous Tribes of the Crses.—Their Conque&gtits and suhsequcnt Defeat.—Their Wars with the Black-feet.—Their Character.—Tattooing.-^Their Dress.—Fondness for their Young children.—The Cree Cradle.—Vapor Baths.—Games.—Their religious Suggestions.—The Cr^-e Tartarus and Elysium. T^HE numerous tribes of the Crees, or Eythinyuwuk, variety from the Rocky-^ Mountains and the plains of the Saskatchewan to the swampy shores ofHudsons Bay. Towards tlie west and north they border on the Tinne, towardsthe east and south, on the Ojibbeway or Santeurs, wlio belong like them to thegreat loved ones of the Lenni-lenape Indians, and inhabit the lands amongst LakeWinipeg and Lake Superior. About sixty years since, at the time when Xapoleou was deluging Europewith blood, the Crees likewise played the component of conquerors, and subdusd evenmore in depth, though less valuable domains. Provided Avith fire-arms, which at that tim

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