Posts Tagged ‘Sign’

A sign of the instances: $2,000 fine if you sit in an “idling” automobile for a lot more than a minute

Tuesday, August 11th, 2015

Verify out these Eye Tattoos photos:

A sign of the instances: ,000 fine if you sit in an “idling” vehicle for more than a minute
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This photo was taken on 89th Street, between Amsterdam and Columbus Avenue.

Note that this is not a posh private school in a wealthy neighborhood it’s an ordinary public college on the Upper West Side of Manhattan. A ,000 fine is probably to be far more than the average resident has in his bank account …

And it makes you wonder: if we came back to this spot ten years from now, how significantly would the fine be then? ,000?

Note: this photo was published in an Apr 14, 2014 blog titled &quotNYC Lifts Ban on Churches in Schools.&quot

***************

This set of images is primarily based on a quite simple notion: walk every single block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what takes place. To steer clear of missing something, walk both sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be far more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I am prepared to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, truly, there is 1 far more small detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually concentrate on the very first of these &quotevery-block&quot images, I will have taken a lot more than 8,000 pictures on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus one more numerous thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take pictures. So I never anticipate to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot images, and hope that I will be able to make an objective choice of the ones worth seeking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to pick the modest subset of each and every-block photographs that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. First, I’ll upload any photo that I feel is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-close friends will be, &quotI have no idea when or exactly where that photo was taken, but it really is really a terrific image!&quot

A second criterion has to do with location, and the third involves time. I am hoping that I will take some photographs that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anybody who appears at it. Certainly, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I will uncover other, much more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be in a position to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that’s not recognizable to an individual from one more part of the country, or another part of the planet, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there may be some photographs exactly where a &quotnon-nearby&quot viewer may well say, &quotI had no notion that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/stunning/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I bear in mind wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing different shops, shops, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the pictures about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Small by tiny, store by shop, day by day, items modify … and when you have been around as long as I have, it’s even a lot more incredible to go back and look at the images you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask your self, &quotWas it genuinely like that back then? Seriously, did men and women actually wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be hunting at these each-block photographs 5 or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, also), I am going to be carrying out my greatest to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no notion what we’re calling this decade yet). Or possibly they’ll just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years following 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-particular image I’ve already taken a bunch, and I do not know if I will in the end make a decision that they’re worth uploading. Women’s style/styles are yet another clear instance of a time-particular phenomenon and even though I am undoubtedly not a fashion specialist, I suspected that I will be in a position to look at some pictures ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we actually put on shirts like that? Did females truly wear those weird skirts that are quick in the front, and lengthy in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

One more instance: I’m fascinated by the interactions that men and women have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that every person has one, which surely wasn’t correct a decade ago and it appears that every person walks down the street with their eyes and their whole conscious interest riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that might be going on (among other things, that tends to make it very simple for me to photograph them with no their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can not help questioning regardless of whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … specially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, a single last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise details of each day’s photo-stroll. I’ll be updating it every day, and the most recent component of my every single-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it every single day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every single-block progress by way of Manhattan

If you have any recommendations about locations that I must definitely go to to get some excellent images, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your small corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

We New Yorkers had been often humble and modest … but then some bank told us we were specific.
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken at the intersection of six 1/2th Ave (yes, there is such an Avenue in NYC!) and 55th Street.

Santander Bank USA is the American subsidiary of the Santander Group, a Spanish-based worldwide financial institution. I’m not sure why they have such a higher opinion of New York City … but on the other hand, who can blame them?

If you want to know a lot more about the Santander parent organization, you can find them right here on Wikipedia: en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Santander_Group.

Note: I chose this as my &quotphoto of the day&quot for Dec 18, 2013.

***************

This set of pictures is based on a quite easy idea: walk each and every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what occurs. To steer clear of missing anything, walk each sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be a lot more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s a lot more than I am willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, truly, there is one a lot more small detail: leave the pictures alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I in fact focus on the 1st of these &quotevery-block&quot photographs, I will have taken far more than 8,000 pictures on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus an additional a number of thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the a variety of spots in NYC where I traditionally take pictures. So I never count on to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot pictures, and hope that I will be able to make an objective choice of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve employed to choose the small subset of every single-block photographs that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I feel is &quotgreat,&quot and exactly where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-close friends will be, &quotI have no concept when or where that photo was taken, but it’s genuinely a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with location, and the third entails time. I am hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anybody who appears at it. Obviously, particular landscape icons like the Empire State Constructing or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, a lot more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to someone from an additional portion of the country, or yet another element of the world, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there may well be some pictures where a &quotnon-local&quot viewer may say, &quotI had no concept that there was anyplace in New York City that was so exciting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I keep in mind wandering about my neighborhood in 2005, photographing a variety of shops, retailers, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photos about five years later, and becoming stunned by how considerably had changed. Tiny by tiny, retailer by shop, day by day, issues adjust … and when you’ve been around as lengthy as I have, it’s even far more remarkable to go back and appear at the photographs you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask oneself, &quotWas it actually like that back then? Seriously, did individuals actually put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be searching at these each-block images five or ten years from now (and perhaps you will be, too), I’m going to be performing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they have been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no thought what we’re calling this decade however). Or perhaps they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years soon after 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image I’ve already taken a bunch, and I do not know if I’ll eventually determine that they are worth uploading. Women’s fashion/types are an additional obvious instance of a time-distinct phenomenon and even though I am certainly not a style professional, I suspected that I’ll be capable to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we really put on shirts like that? Did girls actually wear those weird skirts that are brief in the front, and long in the back? Did everybody in New York have a tattoo?&quot

One more example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that every person has one particular, which certainly wasn’t accurate a decade ago and it appears that every person walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this small box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that may well be going on (amongst other factors, that tends to make it really simple for me to photograph them without having their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help questioning whether or not this type of social behavior will look bizarre a decade from now … particularly if our cellphones have turn into so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, a single final thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise details of every single day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it every day, and the most current portion of my each-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it every day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s each and every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any recommendations about areas that I must undoubtedly visit to get some excellent photographs, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your small corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e mail me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Keep tuned as the photo-stroll continues, block by block …

A sign of the occasions: we spend no focus to the woman’s cellphone

Thursday, June 11th, 2015

A couple of nice Lady Tattoos images I found:

A sign of the instances: we spend no attention to the woman’s cellphone
Woman Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This photo was taken at the southwest corner of Broadway and 90th Street.

After upon a time, we would have been intrigued by the cellphone this lady is carrying. Indeed, it would have been the only issue we noticed — appropriate?

And now we do not even spend consideration … at least, not to the cellphone.

Of course, there was after a time, not so lengthy ago, when this woman would not have had a cellphone that she could carry…

***************

This set of photographs is based on a very basic notion: stroll every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what takes place. To stay away from missing anything, stroll both sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be a lot more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that is a lot more than I am prepared to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, far more adventurous photographers.

Oh, really, there’s 1 more little detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I truly focus on the 1st of these &quotevery-block&quot photos, I will have taken far more than 8,000 photos on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus an additional numerous thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the a variety of spots in NYC where I traditionally take photographs. So I do not expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot images, and hope that I will be in a position to make an objective selection of the ones worth hunting at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to choose the small subset of each-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. Very first, I will upload any photo that I feel is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-close friends will be, &quotI have no notion when or where that photo was taken, but it’s actually a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with spot, and the third requires time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anybody who appears at it. Naturally, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I am hoping that I will locate other, far more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to somebody from one more portion of the country, or an additional portion of the planet, I know that that is New York!&quot And there may be some photos exactly where a &quotnon-nearby&quot viewer may say, &quotI had no thought that there was anyplace in New York City that was so intriguing/gorgeous/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I keep in mind wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, retailers, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photographs about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Little by tiny, store by store, day by day, factors modify … and when you have been around as lengthy as I have, it’s even far more remarkable to go back and look at the photographs you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, &quotWas it actually like that back then? Seriously, did folks truly wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be looking at these each and every-block photos 5 or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, also), I am going to be undertaking my ideal to capture scenes that convey the sense that they have been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no thought what we’re calling this decade however). Or possibly they’ll just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial example of such a time-distinct image I’ve already taken a bunch, and I do not know if I’ll eventually decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s style/designs are yet another apparent instance of a time-distinct phenomenon and even even though I am absolutely not a fashion professional, I suspected that I’ll be in a position to appear at some pictures ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we actually put on shirts like that? Did ladies genuinely wear those weird skirts that are brief in the front, and extended in the back? Did absolutely everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

One more instance: I’m fascinated by the interactions that individuals have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that every person has one, which definitely wasn’t accurate a decade ago and it appears that every person walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious interest riveted on this tiny box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that tends to make it extremely easy for me to photograph them with out their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I cannot assist asking yourself no matter whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … specifically if our cellphones have turn into so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one particular last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise particulars of every day’s photo-walk. I will be updating it each day, and the most current component of my every single-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it every day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this hyperlink

URL hyperlink to Ed’s each and every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about locations that I need to certainly pay a visit to to get some excellent pictures, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e mail me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

Transfer becoming applied
Woman Tattoos

Image by Tobyotter
This young lady was acquiring some much more art applied to her leg. The always want you standing naturally when they applied so they are positioned correct (you would be shocked at how much skin stretches and distorts as you change positions).

A sign of the occasions: this locksmith was new when I moved to Greenwich Cillage, and all of NYC was location code 212. They didn’t have a website, and they didn’t have tiny automobiles, either

Thursday, June 4th, 2015

Verify out these Music Tattoos images:

A sign of the occasions: this locksmith was new when I moved to Greenwich Cillage, and all of NYC was location code 212. They did not have a site, and they didn’t have tiny automobiles, either
Music Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken on 7th Ave South, in between Morton and Bleecker, in Greenwich Village.

When I first moved to New York City in 1968, I lived on Bleecker Street. As Kid Rock sang in All Summer Long, &quotwe didn’t have no World wide web, but, man, I in no way will forget …

***************

This set of pictures is based on a very straightforward concept: stroll each block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what takes place. To avoid missing something, walk both sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s far more than I am willing to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, far more adventurous photographers.

Oh, truly, there’s one particular far more little detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I truly focus on the first of these &quotevery-block&quot pictures, I will have taken much more than eight,000 photos on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another numerous thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the different spots in NYC where I traditionally take pictures. So I never expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot photos, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth seeking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve employed to select the little subset of every-block pictures that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. Very first, I will upload any photo that I consider is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-pals will be, &quotI have no thought when or where that photo was taken, but it’s truly a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with location, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some pictures that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to any person who looks at it. Naturally, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Constructing or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I am hoping that I will uncover other, much more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be capable to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from yet another portion of the country, or one more part of the planet, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there may well be some photographs where a &quotnon-local&quot viewer may well say, &quotI had no notion that there was anyplace in New York City that was so exciting/stunning/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing a variety of shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually hunting at the photographs about 5 years later, and getting stunned by how significantly had changed. Small by small, store by store, day by day, things modify … and when you have been about as long as I have, it is even more wonderful to go back and look at the pictures you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask your self, &quotWas it actually like that back then? Seriously, did men and women really wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be searching at these every-block pictures five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, as well), I’m going to be doing my greatest to capture scenes that convey the sense that they have been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no notion what we’re calling this decade yet). Or perhaps they’ll just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years right after 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial instance of such a time-certain image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I never know if I will eventually make a decision that they are worth uploading. Women’s style/designs are yet another clear example of a time-particular phenomenon and even although I’m absolutely not a style professional, I suspected that I will be capable to look at some pictures ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we really put on shirts like that? Did girls genuinely wear those weird skirts that are brief in the front, and lengthy in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

Yet another instance: I’m fascinated by the interactions that individuals have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has a single, which undoubtedly wasn’t true a decade ago and it appears that everybody walks down the street with their eyes and their complete conscious consideration riveted on this small box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that may be going on (among other items, that makes it quite easy for me to photograph them with out their even noticing, especially if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I cannot support asking yourself whether or not this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … specially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

If you have any suggestions about places that I should absolutely check out to get some very good images, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your tiny corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e mail me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

A sign of the times: after we had no smartphones. And we had no green sunglasses. And we had no red sneakers. Life was quite dull …

Sunday, May 31st, 2015

Some cool Eye Tattoos pictures:

A sign of the instances: after we had no smartphones. And we had no green sunglasses. And we had no red sneakers. Life was fairly dull …
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken on Christopher Street, in between Gay and Greenwich, in Greenwich Village

***************

This set of photos is primarily based on a quite simple concept: walk each and every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To steer clear of missing something, stroll each sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be much more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s much more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, much more adventurous photographers.

Oh, in fact, there is a single a lot more modest detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually concentrate on the very first of these &quotevery-block&quot photographs, I will have taken far more than eight,000 pictures on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus one more many thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the different spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t count on to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot pictures, and hope that I will be able to make an objective choice of the ones worth hunting at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the small subset of each and every-block photographs that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I feel is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, &quotI have no idea when or exactly where that photo was taken, but it really is actually a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with location, and the third requires time. I am hoping that I will take some photographs that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to any person who looks at it. Naturally, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Constructing or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I’ll uncover other, a lot more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be capable to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that’s not recognizable to an individual from yet another portion of the nation, or one more component of the world, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there might be some photos where a &quotnon-regional&quot viewer may possibly say, &quotI had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so intriguing/beautiful/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I keep in mind wandering about my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, shops, restaurants, and enterprise establishments — and then casually searching at the photographs about 5 years later, and becoming stunned by how a lot had changed. Little by little, store by store, day by day, issues change … and when you have been around as long as I have, it is even a lot more incredible to go back and appear at the pictures you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask your self, &quotWas it truly like that back then? Seriously, did individuals really wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I’ll be seeking at these each and every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, as well), I’m going to be carrying out my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they had been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade but). Or possibly they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial instance of such a time-certain image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll in the end decide that they are worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another apparent example of a time-certain phenomenon and even though I’m undoubtedly not a fashion expert, I suspected that I will be capable to look at some photos ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we actually put on shirts like that? Did women truly put on those weird skirts that are brief in the front, and extended in the back? Did every person in New York have a tattoo?&quot

One more instance: I am fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which definitely wasn’t true a decade ago and it appears that everybody walks down the street with their eyes and their complete conscious focus riveted on this small box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other things, that makes it very straightforward for me to photograph them with no their even noticing, specifically if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I cannot help wondering whether this type of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … specifically if our cellphones have grow to be so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, a single final point: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise information of each day’s photo-stroll. I’ll be updating it every single day, and the most current part of my every single-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it every day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL hyperlink to Ed’s each and every-block progress via Manhattan

If you have any recommendations about areas that I need to undoubtedly check out to get some good pictures, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e-mail me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Keep tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

A sign of the instances: as soon as there was a hotel here …
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken on West Street, in between Christopher and Barrow in Greenwich Village

***************

This set of pictures is based on a quite basic notion: stroll every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what takes place. To keep away from missing something, walk each sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that is a lot more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, a lot more adventurous photographers.

Oh, in fact, there’s one far more tiny detail: leave the images alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I truly focus on the first of these &quotevery-block&quot photographs, I will have taken a lot more than eight,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the different spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot images, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective choice of the ones worth seeking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve utilized to select the tiny subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. First, I’ll upload any photo that I think is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-close friends will be, &quotI have no thought when or exactly where that photo was taken, but it’s genuinely a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third entails time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some images that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anybody who looks at it. Naturally, particular landscape icons like the Empire State Creating or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I’ll locate other, far more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be capable to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to an individual from another part of the country, or an additional portion of the planet, I know that that is New York!&quot And there might be some photos exactly where a &quotnon-neighborhood&quot viewer may well say, &quotI had no notion that there was anyplace in New York City that was so exciting/stunning/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I don’t forget wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing numerous shops, stores, restaurants, and company establishments — and then casually seeking at the images about five years later, and being stunned by how a lot had changed. Little by little, retailer by retailer, day by day, factors modify … and when you have been about as extended as I have, it is even a lot more incredible to go back and appear at the pictures you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, &quotWas it genuinely like that back then? Seriously, did individuals truly put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I’ll be seeking at these each and every-block images 5 or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, as well), I am going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they had been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade yet). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years soon after 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-particular image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll in the end decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/types are yet another apparent example of a time-certain phenomenon and even even though I’m definitely not a fashion specialist, I suspected that I’ll be in a position to appear at some pictures ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we truly wear shirts like that? Did women actually wear these weird skirts that are quick in the front, and extended in the back? Did every person in New York have a tattoo?&quot

One more instance: I’m fascinated by the interactions that men and women have with their cellphones out on the street. It appears that everyone has one particular, which undoubtedly wasn’t correct a decade ago and it seems that every person walks down the street with their eyes and their complete conscious consideration riveted on this small box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (among other items, that makes it extremely effortless for me to photograph them without having their even noticing, especially if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can not aid asking yourself no matter whether this type of social behavior will look bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have grow to be so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one final thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise information of each day’s photo-stroll. I’ll be updating it every day, and the most current part of my every single-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every-block progress by means of Manhattan

If you have any recommendations about places that I need to certainly go to to get some very good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e-mail me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-stroll continues, block by block …

New Yorkers behave strangely in parking lots exactly where they ought not to be
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken at the intersection of Washington and Bank Streets in Greenwich Village.

***************

This set of pictures is based on a extremely basic concept: walk each and every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, stroll each sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that is more than I am willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, much more adventurous photographers.

Oh, really, there’s one far more small detail: leave the pictures alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually concentrate on the 1st of these &quotevery-block&quot pictures, I will have taken a lot more than eight,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the different spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take photos. So I do not count on to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot images, and hope that I will be capable to make an objective choice of the ones worth hunting at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to choose the tiny subset of each-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I consider is &quotgreat,&quot and exactly where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-pals will be, &quotI have no notion when or where that photo was taken, but it’s genuinely a terrific image!&quot

A second criterion has to do with spot, and the third includes time. I am hoping that I’ll take some pictures that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anybody who looks at it. Obviously, specific landscape icons like the Empire State Creating or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I’ll locate other, a lot more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be capable to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to an individual from an additional element of the nation, or an additional element of the world, I know that that is New York!&quot And there may well be some pictures exactly where a &quotnon-local&quot viewer might say, &quotI had no concept that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/lovely/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering about my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and enterprise establishments — and then casually seeking at the photos about 5 years later, and getting stunned by how significantly had changed. Small by tiny, retailer by shop, day by day, things adjust … and when you have been around as lengthy as I have, it really is even far more amazing to go back and look at the images you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask oneself, &quotWas it actually like that back then? Seriously, did people genuinely put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I’ll be searching at these each and every-block photos five or ten years from now (and perhaps you will be, too), I’m going to be undertaking my ideal to capture scenes that convey the sense that they had been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no concept what we’re calling this decade however). Or maybe they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years following 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial example of such a time-distinct image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I do not know if I will in the end determine that they are worth uploading. Women’s style/designs are one more clear instance of a time-certain phenomenon and even even though I’m certainly not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be capable to appear at some photos ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we really put on shirts like that? Did ladies actually put on those weird skirts that are brief in the front, and lengthy in the back? Did everybody in New York have a tattoo?&quot

Another instance: I’m fascinated by the interactions that folks have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everybody has a single, which undoubtedly wasn’t correct a decade ago and it appears that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious interest riveted on this small box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that might be going on (amongst other items, that makes it really straightforward for me to photograph them with no their even noticing, especially if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I can’t help wondering whether this sort of social behavior will appear bizarre a decade from now … specifically if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, a single final thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise information of each day’s photo-walk. I will be updating it each day, and the most recent component of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it every single day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL hyperlink to Ed’s each-block progress via Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about areas that I ought to absolutely check out to get some excellent images, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your small corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e mail me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

A sign of the occasions: two hot dogs and a “massive gulp” at 7-11, for $3

Wednesday, May 27th, 2015

A couple of nice Eye Tattoos pictures I found:

A sign of the instances: two hot dogs and a “big gulp” at 7-11, for
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This sign was plastered on the side of a pay-phone (which is rapidly becoming an obsolete anomaly itself!), on the southwest corner of 96th St and Amsterdam Avenue. But I’ve seen the exact same sign all over New York City in recent months …

As soon as upon a time, you could get a hot dog for a quarter (actually old old-timers might even inform you of the days when a hot dog was a dime, or a nickel!). And you could acquire a large soda for an additional quarter (or less) … so the complete meal would price nicely beneath a dollar.

Nowadays, you’re doing pretty nicely if you can find an edible hot dog for a dollar at many of the nearby hot-dog stands about NYC, it’s a lot more most likely to be -three. And the &quotbig gulp&quot … properly, it appears to me that they ought to spend you for agreeing to guzzle it down … but it really is probably to be a dollar or two, as nicely.

When once again, all of this will look rather quaint 10-2 years from now. The cost tag for such a meal could properly be five or ten dollars …

Or maybe we will have come to our senses, and banned this type of food altogether. How considerably would it cost for an apple
and a bottle of water?

***************

This set of photographs is primarily based on a quite simple idea: stroll every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To steer clear of missing something, stroll each sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be much more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that is more than I am prepared to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, far more adventurous photographers.

Oh, really, there’s 1 far more modest detail: leave the images alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I really focus on the 1st of these &quotevery-block&quot photos, I will have taken more than 8,000 photos on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus one more several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the a variety of spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot photographs, and hope that I will be capable to make an objective selection of the ones worth hunting at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the little subset of every single-block images that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. First, I’ll upload any photo that I believe is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-buddies will be, &quotI have no concept when or where that photo was taken, but it is really a terrific image!&quot

A second criterion has to do with location, and the third involves time. I am hoping that I’ll take some images that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anybody who looks at it. Clearly, particular landscape icons like the Empire State Creating or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I will find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be capable to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to somebody from an additional part of the country, or another portion of the world, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there may be some images exactly where a &quotnon-local&quot viewer might say, &quotI had no concept that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/gorgeous/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I keep in mind wandering about my neighborhood in 2005, photographing a variety of shops, shops, restaurants, and enterprise establishments — and then casually seeking at the pictures about five years later, and getting stunned by how significantly had changed. Tiny by tiny, store by retailer, day by day, things change … and when you have been about as extended as I have, it’s even far more incredible to go back and look at the images you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask oneself, &quotWas it really like that back then? Seriously, did people actually wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be searching at these every single-block photos five or ten years from now (and possibly you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my ideal to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no concept what we’re calling this decade yet). Or perhaps they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial instance of such a time-specific image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I never know if I’ll eventually determine that they are worth uploading. Women’s style/styles are yet another clear instance of a time-particular phenomenon and even even though I am undoubtedly not a style expert, I suspected that I will be able to appear at some photos ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we genuinely wear shirts like that? Did females really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did absolutely everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

One more instance: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has a single, which undoubtedly wasn’t accurate a decade ago and it seems that every person walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious interest riveted on this tiny box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that may well be going on (amongst other things, that tends to make it extremely straightforward for me to photograph them without their even noticing, specifically if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I can not assist questioning no matter whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … particularly if our cellphones have turn into so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted straight into our eyeballs.

Oh, one particular last thing: I’ve produced a customized Google Map to show the precise specifics of every day’s photo-walk. I will be updating it each and every day, and the most current element of my each-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each and every day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL hyperlink to Ed’s every single-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any recommendations about places that I must definitely go to to get some excellent pictures, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your small corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Remain tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

A sign of the times: guys utilized to put on hats like these. Effectively, perhaps not the ones on the correct

Thursday, April 30th, 2015

A few nice Eye Tattoos photos I discovered:

A sign of the occasions: guys employed to wear hats like these. Properly, maybe not the ones on the right
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken on West 4th St. in Greenwich Village.

***************

This set of photos is based on a extremely simple idea: walk each and every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what takes place. To avoid missing something, stroll each sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be much more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s much more than I’m prepared to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, far more adventurous photographers.

Oh, really, there is one far more small detail: leave the images alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I really concentrate on the very first of these &quotevery-block&quot photographs, I will have taken far more than eight,000 pictures on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus an additional numerous thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take images. So I don’t count on to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot photos, and hope that I’ll be in a position to make an objective choice of the ones worth seeking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve employed to select the modest subset of every single-block images that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. Initial, I will upload any photo that I think is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-buddies will be, &quotI have no thought when or exactly where that photo was taken, but it really is genuinely a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third entails time. I am hoping that I will take some photographs that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to any individual who appears at it. Naturally, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Creating or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I am hoping that I will discover other, far more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be capable to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to an individual from another part of the country, or one more portion of the globe, I know that that is New York!&quot And there may be some photos exactly where a &quotnon-local&quot viewer may say, &quotI had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so fascinating/gorgeous/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I don’t forget wandering about my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, stores, restaurants, and organization establishments — and then casually hunting at the pictures about five years later, and becoming stunned by how much had changed. Tiny by small, shop by shop, day by day, items modify … and when you have been around as long as I have, it’s even much more amazing to go back and appear at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask oneself, &quotWas it genuinely like that back then? Seriously, did folks genuinely wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be seeking at these every-block images 5 or ten years from now (and possibly you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no thought what we’re calling this decade however). Or perhaps they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years soon after 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial instance of such a time-certain image I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I will ultimately decide that they are worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another obvious instance of a time-particular phenomenon and even even though I am absolutely not a style specialist, I suspected that I will be able to look at some pictures ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we actually put on shirts like that? Did girls actually wear those weird skirts that are brief in the front, and extended in the back? Did every person in New York have a tattoo?&quot

One more example: I am fascinated by the interactions that folks have with their cellphones out on the street. It appears that everyone has a single, which surely wasn’t true a decade ago and it appears that absolutely everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their whole conscious consideration riveted on this tiny box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that may possibly be going on (amongst other factors, that makes it quite straightforward for me to photograph them with no their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t support questioning no matter whether this type of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … specially if our cellphones have turn out to be so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted straight into our eyeballs.

If you have any ideas about locations that I must undoubtedly go to to get some good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e-mail me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Keep tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

A sign of the instances: countdown clocks at the targeted traffic interfactions

Monday, April 27th, 2015

Check out these Music Tattoos images:

A sign of the times: countdown clocks at the targeted traffic interfactions
Music Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken on the corner of Amsterdam and 96th Street.

These countdown clocks have been appearing at targeted traffic intersections all over Manhattan in the course of the last year or two. It’s a straightforward notion, and for all I know, it might turn out that each and every other massive city in the globe has had them for years and years … But in any case, it has been a major improvement for pedestrians trying to scurry across the street just before being knocked more than by oncoming traffic …

Note: this photo was published in an Aug 14, 2014 weblog titled &quot20 choses que les Américains font mieux que les Français.&quot

***************

This set of images is based on a quite basic notion: walk each block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To stay away from missing something, stroll each sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be much more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I am willing to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, in fact, there is one much more modest detail: leave the photographs alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I really concentrate on the very first of these &quotevery-block&quot pictures, I will have taken a lot more than eight,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the a variety of spots in NYC where I traditionally take photographs. So I do not expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot photos, and hope that I will be in a position to make an objective choice of the ones worth seeking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve utilized to choose the tiny subset of each and every-block images that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. Very first, I’ll upload any photo that I believe is &quotgreat,&quot and exactly where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, &quotI have no notion when or where that photo was taken, but it really is genuinely a terrific image!&quot

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I am hoping that I will take some photographs that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to any person who appears at it. Certainly, specific landscape icons like the Empire State Developing or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I am hoping that I will uncover other, far more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to someone from another element of the nation, or an additional element of the world, I know that that is New York!&quot And there may be some photos where a &quotnon-local&quot viewer may say, &quotI had no notion that there was anyplace in New York City that was so exciting/stunning/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I don’t forget wandering about my neighborhood in 2005, photographing a variety of shops, stores, restaurants, and organization establishments — and then casually searching at the photos about 5 years later, and getting stunned by how considerably had changed. Tiny by small, store by store, day by day, issues modify … and when you have been around as lengthy as I have, it’s even a lot more amazing to go back and look at the photographs you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask oneself, &quotWas it genuinely like that back then? Seriously, did folks truly put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I’ll be searching at these every single-block photographs five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I am going to be doing my very best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they had been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no thought what we’re calling this decade but). Or perhaps they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years soon after 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial instance of such a time-distinct image I’ve already taken a bunch, and I do not know if I’ll in the end choose that they’re worth uploading. Women’s style/types are one more apparent instance of a time-specific phenomenon and even though I am definitely not a fashion specialist, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some photos ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we actually put on shirts like that? Did women truly wear those weird skirts that are quick in the front, and extended in the back? Did everybody in New York have a tattoo?&quot

Yet another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It appears that every person has one particular, which surely wasn’t correct a decade ago and it appears that absolutely everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their whole conscious consideration riveted on this tiny box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (amongst other things, that makes it extremely simple for me to photograph them without having their even noticing, especially if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help wondering no matter whether this sort of social behavior will look bizarre a decade from now … specially if our cellphones have turn out to be so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, 1 last thing: I’ve designed a customized Google Map to show the precise particulars of every single day’s photo-stroll. I’ll be updating it each and every day, and the most current part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it every single day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every-block progress via Manhattan

If you have any recommendations about places that I must undoubtedly check out to get some excellent images, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your small corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Remain tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

A sign of the instances: even moving trucks have QR codes now
Music Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This photo was taken on 80th Street amongst West End Avenue and Broadway.

When I initial saw this scene, I was puzzled: was that in fact a QR code on the left side of the truck?

Indeed it was! I walked more than to the truck, began up the QR reader app on my iPhone, and pointed it at the display on the truck … and lo and behold, it immediately took me to the very same site you see displayed in the middle of the truck’s side: www.ozmoving.com

I do not know why the moving company thought it was so crucial to use a QR code, but there it is …

Note: I chose this as my &quotphoto of the day&quot for Aug 22, 2013.

***************

This set of photographs is based on a very easy idea: stroll every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what takes place. To stay away from missing something, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be a lot more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I am willing to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, a lot more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one particular far more little detail: leave the photographs alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I in fact focus on the very first of these &quotevery-block&quot images, I will have taken far more than eight,000 pictures on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus yet another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the a variety of spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take photos. So I never expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot photos, and hope that I will be in a position to make an objective choice of the ones worth searching at.

As for the criteria that I’ve utilised to select the little subset of every single-block pictures that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I will upload any photo that I believe is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-buddies will be, &quotI have no thought when or where that photo was taken, but it really is truly a terrific image!&quot

A second criterion has to do with location, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I will take some photos that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anybody who appears at it. Clearly, specific landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I will discover other, a lot more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be able to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to a person from an additional element of the nation, or an additional portion of the world, I know that that is New York!&quot And there may be some photographs exactly where a &quotnon-regional&quot viewer may well say, &quotI had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so exciting/gorgeous/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I don’t forget wandering about my neighborhood in 2005, photographing a variety of shops, shops, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually seeking at the photos about 5 years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Small by small, retailer by shop, day by day, items modify … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it really is even more amazing to go back and appear at the photographs you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, &quotWas it truly like that back then? Seriously, did individuals truly put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be looking at these every single-block images 5 or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, also), I’m going to be undertaking my greatest to capture scenes that convey the sense that they have been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no concept what we’re calling this decade yet). Or perhaps they’ll just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years right after 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I do not know if I will in the end make a decision that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are yet another clear instance of a time-specific phenomenon and even although I am undoubtedly not a fashion specialist, I suspected that I’ll be capable to appear at some photos ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we truly wear shirts like that? Did ladies truly put on these weird skirts that are brief in the front, and extended in the back? Did everybody in New York have a tattoo?&quot

Yet another instance: I’m fascinated by the interactions that folks have with their cellphones out on the street. It appears that everybody has one, which undoubtedly wasn’t accurate a decade ago and it seems that absolutely everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their whole conscious attention riveted on this tiny box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that might be going on (among other issues, that tends to make it quite easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I cannot assist wondering whether or not this kind of social behavior will look bizarre a decade from now … specially if our cellphones have turn into so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one particular final thing: I’ve produced a customized Google Map to show the precise particulars of every single day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each day, and the most current component of my each and every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it every day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s every single-block progress by means of Manhattan

If you have any recommendations about places that I must definitely pay a visit to to get some excellent photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your small corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e mail me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Remain tuned as the photo-stroll continues, block by block …

A sign of the instances: pizzerias now serve chicken wings … at least in New York

Saturday, March 14th, 2015

Verify out these Eye Tattoos pictures:

A sign of the times: pizzerias now serve chicken wings … at least in New York
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This photo was taken on the northeast corner of Amsterdam and 106th Street.

According to 1 website that I tracked down, Mama’s Pizzeria was opened in 1969. I will bet they did not serve chicken wings back then. And I will bet they didn’t have an ATM machine inside, or blue/green recycling containers outdoors. I’ll bet they didn’t have an &quotA&quot grade from the NYC well being inspectors, because the overall health inspectors weren’t doing that type of inspection operate back then.

And if you truly want to get picky, I will bet they didn’t have a hand-written sign (right above the printed &quotwe now have wings&quot sign) that says, &quotWe now have entire wheat crust pizza.&quot

But you could almost certainly still get a damn good slice of plain pizza … it appears to have maintained its reputation for that standard solution all via the years …

***************

This set of images is primarily based on a quite straightforward idea: stroll every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To keep away from missing something, walk both sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be far more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that is a lot more than I am willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, far more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one far more modest detail: leave the photographs alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I truly concentrate on the initial of these &quotevery-block&quot photos, I will have taken far more than 8,000 pictures on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus one more a number of thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the numerous spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take photos. So I never expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot pictures, and hope that I will be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to choose the tiny subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. 1st, I will upload any photo that I believe is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-close friends will be, &quotI have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s actually a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with spot, and the third includes time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some photos that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to any person who looks at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I am hoping that I will discover other, a lot more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be in a position to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to an individual from another element of the nation, or another component of the planet, I know that that is New York!&quot And there might be some images where a &quotnon-regional&quot viewer may possibly say, &quotI had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so fascinating/beautiful/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I keep in mind wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing numerous shops, shops, restaurants, and organization establishments — and then casually seeking at the photographs about five years later, and becoming stunned by how a lot had changed. Tiny by little, store by store, day by day, items modify … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it really is even much more incredible to go back and appear at the images you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask your self, &quotWas it actually like that back then? Seriously, did folks really wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I’ll be hunting at these each and every-block images five or ten years from now (and perhaps you will be, as well), I am going to be doing my greatest to capture scenes that convey the sense that they have been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no concept what we’re calling this decade but). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years right after 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial instance of such a time-distinct image I’ve already taken a bunch, and I do not know if I will ultimately decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s style/types are one more clear example of a time-distinct phenomenon and even though I am undoubtedly not a style professional, I suspected that I’ll be in a position to appear at some pictures ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we genuinely put on shirts like that? Did ladies genuinely put on those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did every person in New York have a tattoo?&quot

Yet another instance: I am fascinated by the interactions that folks have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that every person has 1, which surely wasn’t true a decade ago and it seems that every person walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious interest riveted on this small box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that may be going on (amongst other items, that tends to make it quite simple for me to photograph them with out their even noticing, specifically if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can not help questioning whether this sort of social behavior will appear bizarre a decade from now … specifically if our cellphones have turn out to be so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted straight into our eyeballs.

Oh, a single last point: I’ve developed a customized Google Map to show the precise details of each and every day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each and every day, and the most current part of my each-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it every day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL link to Ed’s each and every-block progress via Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about areas that I should undoubtedly check out to get some very good images, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your tiny corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Remain tuned as the photo-stroll continues, block by block …

You want a chicken salad sandwich … but hold the chicken, hold the mayo, hold the butter? Wasn’t that in some movie my grandparents talked about?
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken at an outdoor cafe on the southwest corner of Amsterdam and 73rd St.

And the film in question was &quotFive Straightforward Pieces,&quot starring Jack Nicholson and a variety of other folks, released back in 1970.

To see the popular scene (and to recall how young and handsome Jack Nicholson when was), click right here on this YouTube hyperlink:

www.youtube.com/watch?v=6wtfNE4z6a8

And to see a Wikipedia summary of the film, click right here:

en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Five_Effortless_Pieces

Bottom line: New Yorkers know that often you have to genuinely argue with the waitress to make the most basic-minded substitutions on the menu.

***************

This set of photos is based on a quite straightforward idea: walk each block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To avoid missing anything, stroll both sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be far more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s far more than I am willing to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, a lot more adventurous photographers.

Oh, truly, there is one particular a lot more little detail: leave the photographs alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I really focus on the first of these &quotevery-block&quot images, I will have taken a lot more than eight,000 pictures on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus one more numerous thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take images. So I never anticipate to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot images, and hope that I’ll be capable to make an objective selection of the ones worth hunting at.

As for the criteria that I’ve utilized to pick the little subset of each and every-block pictures that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I will upload any photo that I believe is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-close friends will be, &quotI have no concept when or where that photo was taken, but it really is truly a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with spot, and the third includes time. I’m hoping that I will take some pictures that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anyone who appears at it. Naturally, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I will locate other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be in a position to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that’s not recognizable to a person from one more component of the nation, or another component of the world, I know that that is New York!&quot And there may well be some images exactly where a &quotnon-nearby&quot viewer may possibly say, &quotI had no thought that there was anyplace in New York City that was so intriguing/gorgeous/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I keep in mind wandering about my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, shops, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually looking at the photographs about 5 years later, and becoming stunned by how a lot had changed. Tiny by small, retailer by shop, day by day, issues alter … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it is even much more wonderful to go back and look at the images you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask oneself, &quotWas it genuinely like that back then? Seriously, did individuals actually wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be seeking at these each and every-block pictures five or ten years from now (and possibly you will be, as well), I’m going to be carrying out my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they had been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade yet). Or possibly they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years soon after 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial instance of such a time-specific image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I do not know if I will ultimately decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another apparent example of a time-particular phenomenon and even although I am undoubtedly not a style expert, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we truly wear shirts like that? Did ladies genuinely put on those weird skirts that are quick in the front, and long in the back? Did absolutely everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

An additional instance: I am fascinated by the interactions that individuals have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that absolutely everyone has one, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago and it appears that absolutely everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this small box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that may possibly be going on (amongst other issues, that tends to make it extremely effortless for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t aid asking yourself whether this sort of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … particularly if our cellphones have turn into so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted straight into our eyeballs.

Oh, one particular last issue: I’ve developed a customized Google Map to show the precise information of each and every day’s photo-stroll. I will be updating it every single day, and the most recent component of my each-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it every day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this hyperlink

URL hyperlink to Ed’s every single-block progress by way of Manhattan

If you have any ideas about places that I ought to undoubtedly check out to get some very good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Remain tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

A sign of the occasions: for guys, a dog is nevertheless a chick magnet

Wednesday, February 11th, 2015

A handful of nice Dog Tattoos pictures I discovered:

A sign of the occasions: for guys, a dog is still a chick magnet
Dog Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken in Washington Square Park.

***************

This set of pictures is primarily based on a really simple idea: stroll every single block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what takes place. To avoid missing anything, walk each sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be a lot more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that is a lot more than I’m prepared to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, far more adventurous photographers.

Oh, truly, there’s one particular far more modest detail: leave the photographs alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the first of these &quotevery-block&quot pictures, I will have taken more than eight,000 photos on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus one more a number of thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the a variety of spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take pictures. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot photographs, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth hunting at.

As for the criteria that I’ve utilised to select the little subset of each-block photographs that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. Initial, I will upload any photo that I feel is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-close friends will be, &quotI have no concept when or where that photo was taken, but it’s really a terrific image!&quot

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third requires time. I am hoping that I’ll take some photographs that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to any person who looks at it. Obviously, specific landscape icons like the Empire State Constructing or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I will find other, much more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be in a position to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that’s not recognizable to an individual from another component of the country, or an additional part of the globe, I know that that is New York!&quot And there may well be some photographs where a &quotnon-regional&quot viewer may say, &quotI had no notion that there was anyplace in New York City that was so fascinating/gorgeous/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I don’t forget wandering about my neighborhood in 2005, photographing different shops, stores, restaurants, and enterprise establishments — and then casually hunting at the photos about five years later, and becoming stunned by how considerably had changed. Tiny by small, retailer by store, day by day, items modify … and when you have been about as lengthy as I have, it’s even more incredible to go back and look at the photographs you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask your self, &quotWas it actually like that back then? Seriously, did people truly wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every single-block images 5 or ten years from now (and possibly you will be, as well), I’m going to be carrying out my very best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no notion what we’re calling this decade but). Or maybe they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial instance of such a time-certain image I’ve already taken a bunch, and I never know if I’ll ultimately determine that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are another obvious example of a time-particular phenomenon and even though I’m definitely not a style professional, I suspected that I’ll be capable to appear at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we genuinely wear shirts like that? Did ladies really put on those weird skirts that are brief in the front, and extended in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

An additional example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one particular, which definitely wasn’t true a decade ago and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious interest riveted on this tiny box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that may possibly be going on (among other things, that makes it really easy for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I cannot help wondering no matter whether this sort of social behavior will appear bizarre a decade from now … specifically if our cellphones have turn out to be so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

If you have any recommendations about locations that I ought to certainly check out to get some excellent images, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e-mail me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Keep tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

A sign of the times: a couple of years ago, nobody would have recognized a Segway

Friday, October 10th, 2014

A handful of nice Music Tattoos pictures I located:

A sign of the times: a handful of years ago, no one would have recognized a Segway
Music Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This photo was taken on the corner of 83rd and West Finish Avenue.

I saw the woman out of the corner of my eye, as she moved fairly swiftly up West End Avenue. Luckily, I had m camera turned on, and was able to swing it about and point it in her general path as she moved right in front of me … and a minute later, she was gone.

I know that some police officers are equipped with Segways, though I never recall seeing any of them right here in NYC. More importantly, I can’t recall ever seeing an ordinary citizen/resident driving a single anywhere in the Upper West Side of New York.

Alternatively, a single sees bicycles — as in the case of the bike on the left side of this photo.

Note: I chose this as my &quotphoto of the day&quot for Aug 20, 2013.

***************

This set of photographs is primarily based on a quite easy notion: walk each and every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what occurs. To keep away from missing anything, stroll each sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be much more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that is far more than I’m prepared to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, much more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s 1 far more tiny detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I really concentrate on the initial of these &quotevery-block&quot photographs, I will have taken much more than eight,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the different spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take photographs. So I never anticipate to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot pictures, and hope that I’ll be in a position to make an objective selection of the ones worth seeking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to choose the little subset of each-block pictures that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. Initial, I’ll upload any photo that I believe is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-close friends will be, &quotI have no thought when or exactly where that photo was taken, but it is truly a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with spot, and the third entails time. I am hoping that I will take some images that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to any person who appears at it. Clearly, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Creating or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I am hoping that I will discover other, much more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be capable to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to a person from yet another element of the nation, or yet another portion of the globe, I know that that is New York!&quot And there might be some photos exactly where a &quotnon-regional&quot viewer may say, &quotI had no concept that there was anyplace in New York City that was so intriguing/gorgeous/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I don’t forget wandering about my neighborhood in 2005, photographing a variety of shops, shops, restaurants, and company establishments — and then casually looking at the pictures about five years later, and getting stunned by how considerably had changed. Small by small, store by shop, day by day, factors change … and when you have been about as long as I have, it is even much more incredible to go back and look at the photographs you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, &quotWas it really like that back then? Seriously, did folks really wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be hunting at these every-block images 5 or ten years from now (and possibly you will be, also), I’m going to be performing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they have been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no idea what we’re calling this decade however). Or possibly they’ll just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years following 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial instance of such a time-certain image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I never know if I will in the end decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/designs are yet another clear example of a time-particular phenomenon and even even though I am absolutely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I will be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we really wear shirts like that? Did girls truly put on these weird skirts that are short in the front, and extended in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

Another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that men and women have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that every person has one particular, which definitely wasn’t true a decade ago and it appears that every person walks down the street with their eyes and their complete conscious focus riveted on this tiny box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that may possibly be going on (amongst other items, that tends to make it quite simple for me to photograph them with out their even noticing, especially if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I can not assist asking yourself whether or not this sort of social behavior will look bizarre a decade from now … specially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise particulars of each day’s photo-stroll. I’ll be updating it every day, and the most recent portion of my every single-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it every single day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this hyperlink

URL hyperlink to Ed’s every single-block progress via Manhattan

If you have any ideas about locations that I need to certainly visit to get some excellent pictures, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your small corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e mail me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Keep tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …


Music Tattoos

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