Posts Tagged ‘Smithsonian’

Image from page 298 of “Annual report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution” (1846)

Tuesday, December 23rd, 2014

Some cool Fish Tattoos images:

Image from web page 298 of “Annual report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution” (1846)
Fish Tattoos

Image by World wide web Archive Book Photos
Identifier: annualreportofbo1888smiths
Title: Annual report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution
Year: 1846 (1840s)
Authors: Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents United States National Museum. Report of the U.S. National Museum Smithsonian Institution. Report of the Secretary
Subjects: Smithsonian Institution Smithsonian Institution. Archives Discoveries in science
Publisher: Washington : Smithsonian Institution

View Book Web page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Photos: All Pictures From Book

Click right here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable on-line version of this book.

Text Appearing Ahead of Image:
ney Eound the World, p. 204, Vol. i. (1841). X Vancouver, Voyages, Vol. ii, p. 408, states that the copper or brass corrodesthe lacerated parts, and by consuming the flesh progressively iricrenses the orifice untilit is .sufficiently massive to admit tl&gte wooden appendagf. 256 EXPLANATION OF PLATE IV. Chief Kitkun, of the Haida Village of Las Keek, Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia. From a photograph in the U. S. National Musejm. Kitkun is here chosen as a sort of the Haida Indian. The rank which he heldin 1873 was that of a petty chief of the village, his brother, Chief Klue, becoming thehead chief. On the death of his brother, Kitkun became head chief of the village,assuming the hereditary title. Chief Klue. The tattoo mark on the breast repre-sents Kaliatla, the cod-fish, and that on his arms Cheena, the salmon. The designon liis back is shown in Fig. 2, Plate V, and represents Wasko, a mythologicalbeing of the wolf species. Report of National Museum, 1888.—Niblack. Plate IV.

Text Appearing Soon after Image:
Chief Kitkun, of the Haida Village of Las Keek, Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia. EXPLANATION OF PLATE V.

Note About Photos
Please note that these photos are extracted from scanned web page pictures that may possibly have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations might not completely resemble the original function.

Image from page 225 of “The Australian abroad on branches from the primary routes round the planet” (1885)
Fish Tattoos

Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: australianabroad00hingrich
Title: The Australian abroad on branches from the major routes round the planet
Year: 1885 (1880s)
Authors: Hingston, James, b. 1830
Subjects: Australia — Description and travel East Asia — Description and travel New Zealand — Description and travel Middle East — Description and travel
Publisher: Melbourne, W. Inglis

View Book Web page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Photos: All Images From Book

Click here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable on the web version of this book.

Text Appearing Just before Image:
tist has a fine field just before him. A prominent nose, like to Wellingtons 2o6 The Main Routes Round the Globe. or Artemus Wards, can be properly decorated on both sides — a broad onecan be only so accomplished down the bridge of it. A Walter Scott forehead canhave wonders accomplished upon its surface, and a chin like to a hand of pork, or liketo the first Napoleons, can be improved upon to any extent. Whether or not cheekswill look ideal with curved lines or straight ones, and which way the curvesshall go, is all matter of art, higher art. A face may be painted in designs adozen instances before that which is to stand for all time—the owners time—isdetermined upon. If the subject, or patient, be of any standing or con-sequence, the opinion of his relatives and friends is typically sought by the artist.He is sent house to them with the painted face that they might approve thedesign. The photographer of the present day adopts this concept when he sendsus the 1st proof of his adverse. Take it, he says, and ask your buddies

Text Appearing Soon after Image:
ARTISTIC TATTOOING (two). opinion of it. When the design has been lastly authorized of, then troublebegins. With points and edges of sharp sea-shells the victim of vanity is discomfort-fully excoriated, and a blue colouring matter, got largely from a shell-fish, isintroduced into his wounds. A small of this operate goes a long way at a time,and the skin is left to heal up. To do a whole face will take from 3 tosix months, and actually fantastic works some of these tattooed heads look. Inmost European museums one of them will be found. A excellent trade was carriedon in tattooed Maori heads a lot of years ago, until Governor Grey stopped it,and seized a sackful of heads that had been placed on shipboard for exporta-tion. Such exports fetched good rates, and, as the Maories have the Egyptianembalming secret of preserving them in excellent condition, a profitablebusiness to them seemed as a result to have been suddenly crushed. Such inter- Aji Artistic Procedure. 207 ference with free of charge trade was the much more to be deplored

Note About Images
Please note that these pictures are extracted from scanned page photos that could have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may possibly not perfectly resemble the original perform.

Image from web page 324 of “Annual report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution” (1895)

Monday, December 15th, 2014

Verify out these Indian Tattoos photos:

Image from page 324 of “Annual report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution” (1895)
Indian Tattoos

Image by Web Archive Book Images
Identifier: annualreportofbu117smit
Title: Annual report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution
Year: 1895 (1890s)
Authors: Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology
Subjects: Smithsonian Institution. Bureau of American Ethnology Ethnology Indians
Publisher: Washington : U. S. Govt. Print. Off.

View Book Web page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Photos: All Images From Book

Click right here to view book on-line to see this illustration in context in a browseable on-line version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
Snake-skin belt. The custom is apparently obsolete, and absolutely nothing is identified straight ofdetails or motives. pjxcepting these mutilations the corporeal decoration of the Seri isapparently limited to the face-painting: amongst the 00 individuals atGosta Rica in 1804 there was no trace of tattooing or scarification offace, limbs, or physique there were no labrets or earrings, and neitherlips nor ears have been pierced, nor were nasal septa observed to be per-forated in accordance with the reputed ancient custom the teeth wereneither tiled nor drilled no indications of amputation or other maim-ing (save the removal of the incisors) had been observed—indeed, theinstinct for physical markings of symbolic or decorative character,which seems to be typical to primitive males, was apparently satisfiedby the prevalent and persistent face-painting amongst the females. The extra-corporeal decorative devices are of a meagerness and pov- Travels, p. 286. BUREAU OF AMERICAN ETHNOLOGY SEVENTEENTH ANNUAL REPORT PL, XXVII

Text Appearing After Image:
SERI FACE PAINTING PARAPHERNALIA MCGEF] Additional-CORPOREAL DECORATION V erty even transcencling the poor apparel, flimsy liabitatious, and gen-erally ill-developert artifacts of the lowly tribe. The most prominent ])ersoiial ])ossession is the pelican-skin robe itis usually made of six skins, slightly dressed and in complete plumage, sewedtogether with sinew iu a traditional pattern of such sort as to givethe greatest feasible expanse consistent with the irregular outlines ofthe person skins, and at the identical time to disi)lay a conventionalcolor pattern on the feathered side, the colors ranging from the dorsalslate to the ventral white of the fowl (as Indicated in plate xxiii)occasionally there are only 4 skins and rarely there are eight, but theconventional arrangement is maintained. Before the beginning of a

Note About Images
Please note that these photos are extracted from scanned web page photos that might have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and look of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original operate.

Image from web page 200 of “University of California publications in American archaeology and ethnology” (1903)
Indian Tattoos

Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: universityofcali15univ
Title: University of California publications in American archaeology and ethnology
Year: 1903 (1900s)
Authors: University of California (1868-1952) University of California (1868-1952) Publications in American archaeology and ethnology
Subjects: Indians Indians of North America
Publisher: Berkeley University of California Press

View Book Web page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Pictures: All Photos From Book

Click right here to view book on the internet to see this illustration in context in a browseable online version of this book.

Text Appearing Prior to Image:
A TATTOOED IFUGAO OF KABAliUVAN DISTRICT PLATE 17 This is 1 of the ideal homes built by a Philippine population. Note thefenders on the piles to avert ingress of rats. The house is so constructedthat its extremely weight holds the frame together. [156]

Text Appearing Right after Image:
PLATE 18 This valley is not hemmed in by such steep mountains as most other districtsof Ifugao. The view is surpassingly beautiful, combining as it does the ruggedmountain ranges, the fields and huts—the operate of man—and the palms andfeathery bamboos in the foreground. The picture illustrates a function thatbears out the statement produced in the text as to the Ifugaos ability as a mountainagriculturist. Note the fields in the appropriate foreground. The hive-shaped hum-mocks comprise the superior six inches of the fields soil. This soil has beenheaped up by the females working with their bare hands in order that it perhaps aerated and the decomposition of partially decayed vegetable matter completed. [158]

Note About Pictures
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned web page pictures that might have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may possibly not perfectly resemble the original work.

Image from web page 212 of “Expeditions organized or participated in by the Smithsonian Institution..” (1912)

Sunday, September 7th, 2014

Check out these Wings Tattoos photos:

Image from page 212 of “Expeditions organized or participated in by the Smithsonian Institution..” (1912)
Wings Tattoos

Image by World wide web Archive Book Images
Identifier: expeditionsorgan191013191516smit
Title: Expeditions organized or participated in by the Smithsonian Institution..
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Smithsonian Institution
Subjects: Scientific expeditions
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : Smithsonian Institution

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Pictures From Book

Click right here to view book on the internet to see this illustration in context in a browseable on the internet version of this book.

Text Appearing Ahead of Image:
there have been but few who had been entitled to have the ceremony per-formed, l)ecause war honors had been not very easily won and few werewealthy adequate to aiTord the expense of the ceremonies. When,for the duration of the final century, wars among the various tribes ceased, thereal significance of the rite vanished, but the superstitious belief thatthe symbolic figures meant long life to the person so tattooed, re-mained prominently in the minds of the folks. About the time that the appropriate of the honored warrior to the exclu-sive use of the Tattooing Ceremonies came to an end, a new condi-tion arose which materially changed the character of the rite. Fromthe sales of lands to the United States the Osage tribe acquired awealth by which a greater quantity of its members have been enabled to NO. 8 SMITHSONIAN EXPLORATIONS, I913 67 have performed the tattooing, as well as other ceremonies. It wasthen that this ancient rite became the means by which any individualcould publicly show his affection toward a relative.

Text Appearing Following Image:
Fig 64.—An Osage Indian with tattouing. Figure 64 shows designs tattooed u])on the l)ody of a man. Thoseon a lady are much more elaborate and cover the upper part of herbody, breast and back, and the reduced component of her legs. Figure 65 shows 68 SMITHSONTAX M ISCELI.ANEOrS COLLECTIONS VOL. 63 three implements used in tattooing. Every of these is created ofwood aljout the length of a pencil. To the reduced finish are attachedneedles arranged in a straight row, and to the upper finish are fastenedfour small rattles produced of the large wing (|uills of the |)elican. This

Note About Pictures
Please note that these images are extracted from scanned web page photos that could have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original function.

Image from web page 118 of “Bird-life: a guide to the study of our typical birds” (1901)
Wings Tattoos

Image by World wide web Archive Book Photos
Identifier: cu31924022527000
Title: Bird-life: a guide to the study of our typical birds
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors: Chapman, Frank M. (Frank Michler), 1864-1945 Seton, Ernest Thompson, 1860-1946
Subjects: Birds Birds
Publisher: New York, D. Appleton

View Book Web page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Pictures From Book

Click right here to view book on the internet to see this illustration in context in a browseable on the web version of this book.

Text Appearing Ahead of Image:
th it he woos his mate andgives voice to the joyousness of nesting time. In someinstances vocal music might be replaced by instrumental,as in the case of the drumming wing-beat of the Grouse,or the bill-tattoo of the Woodpeckers, each of which areanalogous to song. The season of song corresponds far more or much less closelywith the mating season, though some species begin tosing long before their courting days are near. Othersmay sing to some extent throughout the year, but thereal song period is in the spring. Many birds have a second song period immediatelyafter the completion of their postbreeding molt, but itusually lasts only for a few dajs, and is in no sense com-parable to the true season of song. This is heralded bythe Song Sparrow, whose sweet chant, late in February, * See Witchell, The Evolution of Bird Song (Macmlllan Co.).Bioknell, A Study of the Singing of Our Birds The Axik (New Yorkcity), vol. i, 1884, pp. 60-71, 136-140, 209-318, 333-332 vol. ii, 1885,pp. 144-154, 349-363. 63

Text Appearing Soon after Image:
Web page 110. Plate XX. SCKEECH OWL. Length, 9-40 inches. Upper parts gray, or bright reddish brown, andblacli beneath parts white, gray, or vibrant reddish brown, and blaclieyes yellow. VOICE OP BIRDS. 63 is a most welcome promise of spring. Then stick to theEobins, Blackbirds, and other migrants, until, late inMay, the wonderful springtime chorus is at its height. The Bobolink is the 1st bird to desert the choir.We do not often hear him soon after July 5. Quickly he is fol-lowed by the Veery, and each day now shows some freshvacancy in the ranks of the feathered singers, till byAugust 5 we have left only the Wood Pewee, IndigoBunting, and Eed-eyed Vireo—tireless songsters whofear neither midsummer nor midday heat. Get in touch with-Notes.—The call-notes of birds are even moreworthy of our consideration than are their songs. Song isthe outburst of a particular emotion get in touch with-notes form thelanguage of every single day. Numerous of us are familiar withbirds songs, but who knows their every call-note andwho can tell us what every

Note About Photos
Please note that these photos are extracted from scanned page pictures that might have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original perform.

Image from page 213 of “Expeditions organized or participated in by the Smithsonian Institution..” (1912)

Friday, August 15th, 2014

Some cool Reduce back Tattoos photos:

Image from web page 213 of “Expeditions organized or participated in by the Smithsonian Institution..” (1912)
Lower back Tattoos

Image by Internet Archive Book Images
Identifier: expeditionsorgan191013191516smit
Title: Expeditions organized or participated in by the Smithsonian Institution..
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Smithsonian Institution
Subjects: Scientific expeditions
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : Smithsonian Institution

View Book Web page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Images: All Photos From Book

Click right here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable on the web version of this book.

Text Appearing Prior to Image:
Fig 64.—An Osage Indian with tattouing. Figure 64 shows designs tattooed u])on the l)ody of a man. Thoseon a woman are a lot more elaborate and cover the upper portion of herbody, breast and back, and the decrease portion of her legs. Figure 65 shows 68 SMITHSONTAX M ISCELI.ANEOrS COLLECTIONS VOL. 63 3 implements utilized in tattooing. Each of these is produced ofwood aljout the length of a pencil. To the lower finish are attachedneedles arranged in a straight row, and to the upper finish are fastenedfour tiny rattles created of the massive wing (|uills of the |)elican. This

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig. 65.—Three implements utilised inOsage tattooing. PlKitograpli 1)DeLancev Cil!. bird is referred to in one particular of the dream rituals as. AIo/-thi//-the-do/-tsa-ge, He-who-becomes-really-old-although-but-going. In specific pas-sages of the ritual it is intimated that these implements had been origi-nally made of the wing bone of this bird and were utilized for doctoringas effectively as for tattooing. NO. eight SMITHSONIAN ENPLORATIONS, I913 69 The coloring matter employed in tattooing is produced of charcoalmixed with kettle black and water. The charcoal is produced fromcertain trees that serve as symbols of lengthy life in the war ceremonies.Tail feathers of the pileated Avoodpecker are nsed for ])utting on theink and drawing the lines. ( )n Xovemljer 17, 1910. a-ce-to/-zhi-ga, one particular of the prominentmen of the Ia-ci-n-gthi// band (Hill-top Dwellers) died. It waslearned that he had a a-x()-be-to-ga, a (ireat a-x6-be. Thisis a white pelican, the l)ir(l which is supposed to have revealed,by way of a dream, the mvst

Note About Images
Please note that these pictures are extracted from scanned web page pictures that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not perfectly resemble the original operate.

Image from web page 365 of “The bird, its form and function” (1906)
Lower back Tattoos

Image by Web Archive Book Photos
Identifier: birditsformfuncti00beeb
Title: The bird, its type and function
Year: 1906 (1900s)
Authors: Beebe, William, 1877-1962
Subjects: Birds — Anatomy Birds — Physiology
Publisher: New York, H. Holt and company

View Book Page: Book Viewer
About This Book: Catalog Entry
View All Photos: All Images From Book

Click right here to view book online to see this illustration in context in a browseable on-line version of this book.

Text Appearing Before Image:
Fig. 276.—Trumpeter Swan asleep. sight, the mice and birds have of its deadly presence.Few birds have a flight as noiseless as that of owls, andin some species the motion of the wings makes, as wenoticed in the pheasant, a very audible sound. When awidgeon rises from the water, the whistling of its quills,so dear to the ears of the sportsman, is very shrill. Adove claps its wings together above its back while gain-ing impetus for flight. The characteristic sound fromwhich a hummingbird takes its name is properly recognized. 34^ The Bird When wild geese and swans nest in captivity, theirwings are put to most excellent use as weapons of de-fence, and of course this use should come into play fre-quently when nesting in their native haunts. I haveseen a man knocked breathless by a Canada gander whothought his nest in danger. When preparing for attack,the bird approaches hissing, with head stretched low alongthe ground, and suddenly, without warning, launches

Text Appearing After Image:
Fig 277.—Trumpeter Swan preparing to attack an intruder with its wings. itself straight at ones breast and, clinging with bill andclaws, beats a tattoo with the tough bend of its wings.1 is not most likely to overlook such a drubbing for a longtime. The wings of certain birds are armed with weaponsof offence, such as the Spur-winged Goose, Jacana, Plover,and Screamer. The Spur-winged Goose is a truly danger-ous antagonist and can strike extremely robust blows,bringing the sharp spur to bear with telling effect. These Wings 347 spurs are not claws, but correspond in structure to theordinary spurs on tlie legs of a rooster. The excellent heavy-headed and heavy-bodied hornbillsfly with fantastic effort, and it is stated upon excellent authoritythat when passing low overhead they make a noise likea steam-engine. Even though not strictly inside the prov-

Note About Photos
Please note that these pictures are extracted from scanned web page pictures that may have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and appearance of these illustrations may not completely resemble the original perform.

Find My Tattoo
Categories
Blogroll