Posts Tagged ‘they’

New Yorkers agree with this statement … even even though they are not quite positive what it implies

Monday, August 3rd, 2015

Check out these Music Tattoos photos:

New Yorkers agree with this statement … even even though they’re not very sure what it signifies
Music Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
Note: this photo was taken on the corner of 54th Street and 11th Avenue (as you can confirm by seeking at the street-sign on the extreme left side of the photo), on a glaring-vibrant, but bitter-cold, afternoon in early March 2014. specifically one month prior to I ultimately finished editing and uploading the photo to Flickr.

I have to admit: I really don’t know what this sign signifies. But it does not matter … or, turning it around, it really does matter. Due to the fact every little thing matters.

Especially here in New York …

***************

This set of pictures is primarily based on a extremely simple idea: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what occurs. To keep away from missing anything, stroll both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be much more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that is much more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, a lot more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there is a single a lot more tiny detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I truly concentrate on the initial of these &quotevery-block&quot photographs, I will have taken a lot more than eight,000 photos on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus one more many thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the numerous spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take pictures. So I do not count on to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot images, and hope that I will be capable to make an objective choice of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve utilised to choose the tiny subset of each-block photographs that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. Initial, I’ll upload any photo that I think is &quotgreat,&quot and exactly where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-close friends will be, &quotI have no thought when or where that photo was taken, but it really is actually a terrific image!&quot

A second criterion has to do with spot, and the third includes time. I’m hoping that I will take some images that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anybody who looks at it. Clearly, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I’ll uncover other, a lot more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be able to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to somebody from yet another part of the nation, or one more portion of the world, I know that that is New York!&quot And there might be some images exactly where a &quotnon-neighborhood&quot viewer may say, &quotI had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so fascinating/gorgeous/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I bear in mind wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing different shops, retailers, restaurants, and company establishments — and then casually seeking at the images about five years later, and being stunned by how significantly had changed. Tiny by small, shop by store, day by day, issues change … and when you have been around as long as I have, it really is even a lot more remarkable to go back and appear at the photographs you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask your self, &quotWas it actually like that back then? Seriously, did individuals actually wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be looking at these each and every-block images 5 or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, as well), I’m going to be undertaking my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they had been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no thought what we’re calling this decade however). Or maybe they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years right after 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial instance of such a time-particular image I’ve already taken a bunch, and I never know if I’ll in the end decide that they are worth uploading. Women’s fashion/types are another apparent instance of a time-specific phenomenon and even although I’m absolutely not a style specialist, I suspected that I will be able to look at some pictures ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we really put on shirts like that? Did girls truly put on those weird skirts that are brief in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

Another example: I am fascinated by the interactions that men and women have with their cellphones out on the street. It appears that everyone has one, which definitely wasn’t true a decade ago and it seems that everybody walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious consideration riveted on this small box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that may be going on (among other issues, that tends to make it very straightforward for me to photograph them without having their even noticing, specifically if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t help wondering no matter whether this kind of social behavior will appear bizarre a decade from now … specially if our cellphones have turn into so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, 1 final point: I’ve developed a customized Google Map to show the precise information of each and every day’s photo-stroll. I will be updating it each and every day, and the most recent component of my each and every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it every single day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this hyperlink

URL hyperlink to Ed’s each-block progress by means of Manhattan

If you have any recommendations about places that I ought to absolutely visit to get some very good photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your tiny corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Remain tuned as the photo-stroll continues, block by block …

When New Yorkers get mad, often they stand on their toes …

Saturday, June 20th, 2015

Verify out these Eye Tattoos photos:

When New Yorkers get mad, at times they stand on their toes …
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken on 7th Ave South, close to Commerce

***************

This set of photos is based on a very basic notion: walk every single block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what occurs. To steer clear of missing something, stroll each sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be far more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that is more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, a lot more adventurous photographers.

Oh, truly, there is 1 a lot more modest detail: leave the pictures alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually concentrate on the 1st of these &quotevery-block&quot pictures, I will have taken more than 8,000 pictures on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus yet another a number of thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the a variety of spots in NYC where I traditionally take pictures. So I never expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot photographs, and hope that I will be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth hunting at.

As for the criteria that I’ve utilised to choose the tiny subset of each and every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. Very first, I’ll upload any photo that I believe is &quotgreat,&quot and exactly where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-close friends will be, &quotI have no idea when or exactly where that photo was taken, but it really is truly a terrific image!&quot

A second criterion has to do with spot, and the third includes time. I’m hoping that I will take some photographs that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to any person who looks at it. Naturally, particular landscape icons like the Empire State Creating or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I am hoping that I’ll discover other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that’s not recognizable to a person from another element of the country, or yet another component of the world, I know that that is New York!&quot And there may be some photos where a &quotnon-neighborhood&quot viewer may say, &quotI had no notion that there was anyplace in New York City that was so intriguing/gorgeous/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I keep in mind wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, shops, restaurants, and enterprise establishments — and then casually searching at the images about five years later, and getting stunned by how considerably had changed. Tiny by small, store by shop, day by day, factors alter … and when you have been about as lengthy as I have, it’s even far more incredible to go back and appear at the pictures you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask oneself, &quotWas it truly like that back then? Seriously, did men and women really put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these each and every-block images five or ten years from now (and perhaps you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my greatest to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no concept what we’re calling this decade yet). Or perhaps they’ll just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years soon after 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial instance of such a time-specific image I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll eventually make a decision that they are worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are yet another clear instance of a time-certain phenomenon and even though I am certainly not a fashion specialist, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we really wear shirts like that? Did girls really wear these weird skirts that are quick in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

One more example: I am fascinated by the interactions that men and women have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which certainly wasn’t correct a decade ago and it seems that every person walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious consideration riveted on this tiny box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that may possibly be going on (among other things, that makes it really simple for me to photograph them without their even noticing, specifically if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I can not aid questioning regardless of whether this sort of social behavior will look bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have turn out to be so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, a single last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise particulars of each day’s photo-walk. I will be updating it every day, and the most recent part of my each-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each and every day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this hyperlink

URL hyperlink to Ed’s each and every-block progress via Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about locations that I ought to undoubtedly visit to get some very good images, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your small corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e-mail me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Remain tuned as the photo-stroll continues, block by block …

Occasionally New York women put on dull footwear. But then they generally wear vibrant socks …

Friday, June 12th, 2015

Check out these Lady Tattoos pictures:

At times New York women wear dull footwear. But then they usually wear bright socks …
Woman Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken on 7th Ave &amp West 10th St

***************

This set of pictures is primarily based on a very basic notion: stroll each block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what occurs. To keep away from missing anything, walk each sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that is a lot more than I am willing to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, truly, there’s one far more small detail: leave the pictures alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually concentrate on the first of these &quotevery-block&quot photos, I will have taken more than eight,000 pictures on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus an additional several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the numerous spots in NYC where I traditionally take pictures. So I don’t anticipate to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot images, and hope that I will be in a position to make an objective choice of the ones worth hunting at.

As for the criteria that I’ve utilized to choose the tiny subset of each-block pictures that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. First, I will upload any photo that I feel is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-buddies will be, &quotI have no notion when or exactly where that photo was taken, but it’s genuinely a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third includes time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some images that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to any person who appears at it. Naturally, particular landscape icons like the Empire State Creating or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I am hoping that I’ll find other, a lot more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be capable to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to an individual from an additional component of the nation, or yet another component of the globe, I know that that is New York!&quot And there might be some photos where a &quotnon-local&quot viewer may well say, &quotI had no concept that there was anyplace in New York City that was so intriguing/beautiful/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing a variety of shops, retailers, restaurants, and organization establishments — and then casually searching at the images about 5 years later, and becoming stunned by how much had changed. Tiny by small, retailer by shop, day by day, items change … and when you have been about as lengthy as I have, it’s even more amazing to go back and appear at the images you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, &quotWas it genuinely like that back then? Seriously, did folks actually put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be hunting at these each and every-block photos five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my ideal to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no notion what we’re calling this decade however). Or possibly they’ll just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years right after 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial example of such a time-certain image I’ve already taken a bunch, and I never know if I’ll in the end decide that they’re worth uploading. Women’s style/types are another apparent instance of a time-particular phenomenon and even although I am undoubtedly not a style expert, I suspected that I’ll be in a position to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we actually put on shirts like that? Did girls genuinely wear those weird skirts that are brief in the front, and long in the back? Did absolutely everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

Yet another example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that folks have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that every person has a single, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their whole conscious interest riveted on this small box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that may be going on (amongst other things, that makes it really straightforward for me to photograph them with no their even noticing, especially if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I can’t help wondering whether this type of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … specially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted straight into our eyeballs.

Oh, a single final point: I’ve designed a customized Google Map to show the precise details of every single day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it each and every day, and the most current part of my every single-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this hyperlink

URL link to Ed’s each and every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about areas that I should certainly pay a visit to to get some great photographs, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your small corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

Pixfav-Photos You Really like to View
Woman Tattoos

Image by PixFav.com
Excellent Collection of Photographs from allover the Internet.Our Database has Thousands of Inspiring Photos…@ Pixfav.com

A sign of the occasions: this locksmith was new when I moved to Greenwich Cillage, and all of NYC was location code 212. They didn’t have a website, and they didn’t have tiny automobiles, either

Thursday, June 4th, 2015

Verify out these Music Tattoos images:

A sign of the occasions: this locksmith was new when I moved to Greenwich Cillage, and all of NYC was location code 212. They did not have a site, and they didn’t have tiny automobiles, either
Music Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken on 7th Ave South, in between Morton and Bleecker, in Greenwich Village.

When I first moved to New York City in 1968, I lived on Bleecker Street. As Kid Rock sang in All Summer Long, &quotwe didn’t have no World wide web, but, man, I in no way will forget …

***************

This set of pictures is based on a very straightforward concept: stroll each block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what takes place. To avoid missing something, walk both sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s far more than I am willing to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, far more adventurous photographers.

Oh, truly, there’s one particular far more little detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I truly focus on the first of these &quotevery-block&quot pictures, I will have taken much more than eight,000 photos on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another numerous thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the different spots in NYC where I traditionally take pictures. So I never expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot photos, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth seeking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve employed to select the little subset of every-block pictures that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. Very first, I will upload any photo that I consider is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-pals will be, &quotI have no thought when or where that photo was taken, but it’s truly a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with location, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some pictures that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to any person who looks at it. Naturally, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Constructing or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I am hoping that I will uncover other, much more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be capable to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from yet another portion of the country, or one more part of the planet, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there may well be some photographs where a &quotnon-local&quot viewer may well say, &quotI had no notion that there was anyplace in New York City that was so exciting/stunning/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing a variety of shops, stores, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually hunting at the photographs about 5 years later, and getting stunned by how significantly had changed. Small by small, store by store, day by day, things modify … and when you have been about as long as I have, it is even more wonderful to go back and look at the pictures you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask your self, &quotWas it actually like that back then? Seriously, did men and women really wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be searching at these every-block pictures five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, as well), I’m going to be doing my greatest to capture scenes that convey the sense that they have been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no notion what we’re calling this decade yet). Or perhaps they’ll just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years right after 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial instance of such a time-certain image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I never know if I will eventually make a decision that they are worth uploading. Women’s style/designs are yet another clear example of a time-particular phenomenon and even although I’m absolutely not a style professional, I suspected that I will be capable to look at some pictures ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we really put on shirts like that? Did girls genuinely wear those weird skirts that are brief in the front, and lengthy in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

Yet another instance: I’m fascinated by the interactions that individuals have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has a single, which undoubtedly wasn’t true a decade ago and it appears that everybody walks down the street with their eyes and their complete conscious consideration riveted on this small box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that may be going on (among other items, that makes it quite easy for me to photograph them with out their even noticing, especially if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I cannot support asking yourself whether or not this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … specially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

If you have any suggestions about places that I should absolutely check out to get some very good images, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your tiny corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e mail me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

New Yorkers like to bring their dogs along when they have brunch at an outdoor cafe

Tuesday, June 2nd, 2015

Check out these Eye Tattoos images:

New Yorkers like to bring their dogs along when they have brunch at an outside cafe
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken on W. 4th amongst 10th &amp Charles

***************

This set of photos is primarily based on a quite straightforward concept: walk each block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To keep away from missing anything, stroll each sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s much more than I’m prepared to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, much more adventurous photographers.

Oh, in fact, there is one more small detail: leave the images alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually concentrate on the very first of these &quotevery-block&quot images, I will have taken far more than 8,000 photos on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus an additional many thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the numerous spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take images. So I don’t count on to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot pictures, and hope that I will be capable to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve employed to select the modest subset of every-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. Initial, I will upload any photo that I consider is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, &quotI have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it really is actually a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third involves time. I’m hoping that I will take some pictures that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anybody who appears at it. Clearly, specific landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I will locate other, a lot more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be in a position to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to an individual from one more portion of the country, or one more part of the globe, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there might be some photos where a &quotnon-regional&quot viewer may well say, &quotI had no concept that there was anyplace in New York City that was so intriguing/beautiful/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing numerous shops, stores, restaurants, and company establishments — and then casually looking at the images about 5 years later, and getting stunned by how much had changed. Small by small, store by retailer, day by day, items adjust … and when you have been about as extended as I have, it is even far more remarkable to go back and appear at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask your self, &quotWas it truly like that back then? Seriously, did people actually put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be seeking at these every-block images five or ten years from now (and possibly you will be, as well), I am going to be performing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no thought what we’re calling this decade however). Or possibly they’ll just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years soon after 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I will eventually make a decision that they’re worth uploading. Women’s style/styles are an additional apparent example of a time-specific phenomenon and even although I am absolutely not a style professional, I suspected that I’ll be capable to appear at some photos ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we really wear shirts like that? Did women really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and lengthy in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

An additional instance: I am fascinated by the interactions that folks have with their cellphones out on the street. It appears that everybody has 1, which certainly wasn’t true a decade ago and it appears that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their complete conscious focus riveted on this small box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that may possibly be going on (amongst other things, that tends to make it quite simple for me to photograph them with out their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I can’t support questioning regardless of whether this type of social behavior will appear bizarre a decade from now … specially if our cellphones have turn into so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, a single last issue: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise information of every day’s photo-walk. I will be updating it every day, and the most recent component of my every single-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it every day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this hyperlink

URL link to Ed’s each-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any recommendations about places that I ought to certainly go to to get some great photographs, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e-mail me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Remain tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

New Yorkers like to cross their legs when they stand at a street corner. I don’t know why…
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This photo was taken on Second Avenue and 63rd Street.

***************

This set of pictures is primarily based on a quite basic notion: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what occurs. To keep away from missing vanything, stroll both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that is more than I am prepared to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there is one far more tiny detail: leave the photographs alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I truly focus on the very first of these &quotevery-block&quot photographs, I will have taken more than 8,000 pictures on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus one more several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the different spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take images. So I do not count on to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot images, and hope that I will be in a position to make an objective choice of the ones worth searching at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the modest subset of every-block images that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. 1st, I’ll upload any photo that I consider is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-buddies will be, &quotI have no thought when or where that photo was taken, but it really is genuinely a terrific image!&quot

A second criterion has to do with place, and the third entails time. I’m hoping that I will take some photographs that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anybody who appears at it. Certainly, particular landscape icons like the Empire State Constructing or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I’ll uncover other, much more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be able to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to somebody from one more element of the nation, or one more part of the globe, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there may possibly be some images where a &quotnon-regional&quot viewer may well say, &quotI had no idea that there was anyplace in New York City that was so intriguing/stunning/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing numerous shops, stores, restaurants, and enterprise establishments — and then casually hunting at the pictures about five years later, and becoming stunned by how a lot had changed. Tiny by little, shop by retailer, day by day, items change … and when you have been around as lengthy as I have, it’s even far more wonderful to go back and look at the images you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask oneself, &quotWas it really like that back then? Seriously, did folks actually put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I’ll be seeking at these every-block pictures five or ten years from now (and possibly you will be, too), I’m going to be doing my very best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they have been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no concept what we’re calling this decade but). Or perhaps they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-certain image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I do not know if I’ll eventually choose that they are worth uploading. Women’s style/types are an additional obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon and even though I am undoubtedly not a style specialist, I suspected that I’ll be capable to appear at some photos ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we really put on shirts like that? Did girls really put on those weird skirts that are short in the front, and extended in the back? Did every person in New York have a tattoo?&quot

Another example: I am fascinated by the interactions that men and women have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has a single, which surely wasn’t correct a decade ago and it appears that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious consideration riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that may well be going on (among other factors, that makes it very simple for me to photograph them without their even noticing, especially if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I cannot assist questioning no matter whether this type of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … specifically if our cellphones have turn out to be so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted straight into our eyeballs.

Oh, one particular last issue: I’ve developed a customized Google Map to show the precise specifics of every day’s photo-stroll. I’ll be updating it each and every day, and the most recent part of my each and every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this hyperlink

URL hyperlink to Ed’s each-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about locations that I must undoubtedly go to to get some very good pictures, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e mail me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

New Yorkers truly never care if they block a taxi. Their text messages are a lot more crucial

Saturday, May 9th, 2015

Verify out these Music Tattoos images:

New Yorkers genuinely don’t care if they block a taxi. Their text messages are a lot more crucial
Music Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken on Bleecker, beteween Mercer &amp Thompson, in Greenwich Village.

***************

This set of images is primarily based on a very easy idea: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To steer clear of missing something, walk both sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be much more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, truly, there’s one a lot more little detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I really focus on the 1st of these &quotevery-block&quot photographs, I will have taken much more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus one more several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the different spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take photographs. So I never expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot pictures, and hope that I’ll be capable to make an objective choice of the ones worth searching at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to select the tiny subset of every single-block images that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. First, I’ll upload any photo that I believe is &quotgreat,&quot and exactly where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-pals will be, &quotI have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it really is really a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with spot, and the third requires time. I am hoping that I’ll take some images that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anybody who looks at it. Clearly, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Developing or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, far more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be capable to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to someone from an additional part of the nation, or an additional part of the globe, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there might be some photos where a &quotnon-regional&quot viewer may well say, &quotI had no thought that there was anyplace in New York City that was so intriguing/stunning/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I don’t forget wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing various shops, retailers, restaurants, and organization establishments — and then casually seeking at the images about five years later, and being stunned by how much had changed. Small by small, retailer by store, day by day, things alter … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it’s even much more remarkable to go back and appear at the photos you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask your self, &quotWas it truly like that back then? Seriously, did folks genuinely wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I’ll be hunting at these every single-block photographs 5 or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, too), I’m going to be undertaking my ideal to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no notion what we’re calling this decade yet). Or perhaps they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years soon after 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial instance of such a time-certain image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I never know if I’ll eventually determine that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are an additional clear instance of a time-particular phenomenon and even even though I am definitely not a style professional, I suspected that I’ll be capable to look at some photos ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we really put on shirts like that? Did women truly wear these weird skirts that are brief in the front, and long in the back? Did every person in New York have a tattoo?&quot

One more instance: I am fascinated by the interactions that men and women have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everyone has one, which undoubtedly wasn’t accurate a decade ago and it appears that every person walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious attention riveted on this tiny box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that may be going on (among other factors, that makes it very straightforward for me to photograph them with no their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can not aid questioning regardless of whether this type of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

If you have any ideas about areas that I should undoubtedly visit to get some good pictures, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your tiny corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Remain tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

In New York, some men and women put on huge sunglasses. And some men and women wear funny scarves
Music Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken on Houston Street, at the intersection with Essex Street at the northern edge of SoHo, down in the Lower East Side of Manhattan.

In the background, you can see the street sign for Norfolk Street, and on the correct is the fenced-in northern boundary of the ABC Playground. Not to be confused with Hamilton Fish Park, which is about 5 blocks additional east.

As for the young lady on the proper: if that is indeed a monster-size bottle of Red Bull that she’s holding, then I can realize why her hair has turned orange. It may also explain why the man on the left felt that he need to wear oversize sunglasses.

Alas, this photo was shot in (ugh) JPEG, simply because I had just gotten a new Sony A7 Mark II camera, and had forgotten to verify regardless of whether my Apple photo-editing application (Aperture, which I’m desperately holding onto in the hope that Apple’s new Photographs app will not make me crawl and slither to the Dark Side of the Force recognized as Lightroom) had RAW support for the new camera. It turned out that it did not have it at the time (which I checked by means of Google on my iPhone, proper out there on Houston Street). Feh. So, anyway, I had rather restricted ability to lighten the dark-shadowed colors of the couple’s pants.

Note: I chose this as my &quotphoto of the day&quot for Might six, 2015.

***************

This set of photos is primarily based on a very straightforward concept: walk every single block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what occurs. To keep away from missing something, stroll each sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it … it really is a project that I started in the spring of 2013, continued pretty often through the fall of 2014, and have now resumed in the spring of 2015 …

Of course, if you wanted to be a lot more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s far more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I’ll leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, a lot more adventurous photographers.

Oh, really, there’s 1 far more little detail: leave the photographs alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually focus on the initial of these &quotevery-block&quot photographs, I will have taken much more than eight,000 pictures on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus an additional a number of thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take pictures. So I never expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot photos, and hope that I will be capable to make an objective choice of the ones worth hunting at.

As for the criteria that I’ve employed to select the tiny subset of every single-block photographs that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. First, I will upload any photo that I consider is &quotgreat,&quot and exactly where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-pals will be, &quotI have no notion when or exactly where that photo was taken, but it’s genuinely a terrific image!&quot

A second criterion has to do with spot, and the third requires time. I’m hoping that I’ll take some pictures that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anyone who looks at it. Naturally, particular landscape icons like the Empire State Developing or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I will locate other, much more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be in a position to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from yet another element of the nation, or yet another portion of the globe, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there may possibly be some pictures exactly where a &quotnon-nearby&quot viewer may possibly say, &quotI had no notion that there was anyplace in New York City that was so intriguing/gorgeous/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I don’t forget wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing different shops, shops, restaurants, and company establishments — and then casually searching at the pictures about five years later, and becoming stunned by how considerably had changed. Tiny by little, store by shop, day by day, factors change … and when you have been about as extended as I have, it’s even a lot more incredible to go back and appear at the pictures you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, &quotWas it genuinely like that back then? Seriously, did folks really wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every single-block images five or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, as well), I am going to be performing my greatest to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no concept what we’re calling this decade yet). Or possibly they’ll just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years right after 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial instance of such a time-distinct image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I will in the end decide that they are worth uploading. Women’s style/designs are another apparent instance of a time-distinct phenomenon and even although I’m definitely not a style specialist, I suspected that I’ll be in a position to appear at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we genuinely wear shirts like that? Did women genuinely put on those weird skirts that are brief in the front, and extended in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

An additional instance: I’m fascinated by the interactions that individuals have with their cellphones out on the street. It appears that absolutely everyone has one, which surely wasn’t true a decade ago and it appears that every person walks down the street with their eyes and their whole conscious consideration riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that may possibly be going on (among other issues, that makes it extremely straightforward for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t support wondering whether this type of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … specifically if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

If you have any ideas about locations that I need to certainly visit to get some good photographs, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your tiny corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e mail me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Keep tuned as the photo-stroll continues, block by block …

New Yorkers will take advantage of an empty seat …. even if they hate pizza

Monday, March 16th, 2015

Some cool Eye Tattoos pictures:

New Yorkers will take benefit of an empty seat …. even if they hate pizza
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This photo was taken on Lexington, amongst 78th &amp 79th St.

***************

This set of images is based on a really simple idea: stroll each and every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what takes place. To keep away from missing vanything, walk each sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be far more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s a lot more than I am prepared to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, far more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s a single far more small detail: leave the pictures alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I really focus on the first of these &quotevery-block&quot photos, I will have taken a lot more than eight,000 photos on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another many thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the different spots in NYC where I traditionally take pictures. So I do not expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot pictures, and hope that I’ll be able to make an objective choice of the ones worth seeking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve employed to pick the modest subset of every-block images that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. Very first, I’ll upload any photo that I feel is &quotgreat,&quot and exactly where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-pals will be, &quotI have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s really a terrific image!&quot

A second criterion has to do with spot, and the third includes time. I’m hoping that I will take some photographs that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to any person who looks at it. Naturally, specific landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be in a position to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that’s not recognizable to somebody from one more part of the nation, or another component of the world, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there may be some photos where a &quotnon-neighborhood&quot viewer may say, &quotI had no notion that there was anyplace in New York City that was so exciting/stunning/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I don’t forget wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing different shops, shops, restaurants, and company establishments — and then casually looking at the pictures about 5 years later, and getting stunned by how much had changed. Little by little, retailer by retailer, day by day, things alter … and when you’ve been around as lengthy as I have, it’s even much more remarkable to go back and appear at the pictures you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, &quotWas it genuinely like that back then? Seriously, did individuals really put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be seeking at these every single-block photographs five or ten years from now (and perhaps you will be, too), I’m going to be carrying out my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no thought what we’re calling this decade yet). Or possibly they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years soon after 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial instance of such a time-certain image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I do not know if I will in the end choose that they are worth uploading. Women’s style/designs are an additional obvious instance of a time-particular phenomenon and even although I am absolutely not a fashion expert, I suspected that I’ll be capable to appear at some pictures ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we really put on shirts like that? Did girls truly wear those weird skirts that are brief in the front, and lengthy in the back? Did everybody in New York have a tattoo?&quot

An additional example: I am fascinated by the interactions that men and women have with their cellphones out on the street. It appears that every person has one, which certainly wasn’t correct a decade ago and it appears that everybody walks down the street with their eyes and their whole conscious interest riveted on this tiny box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that might be going on (amongst other issues, that makes it really effortless for me to photograph them with no their even noticing, specifically if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I can’t support wondering whether or not this type of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … specifically if our cellphones have grow to be so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, a single final factor: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise specifics of each day’s photo-stroll. I’ll be updating it every single day, and the most current component of my each-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it every single day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this hyperlink

URL hyperlink to Ed’s every-block progress by way of Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about locations that I need to certainly check out to get some good photographs, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Remain tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

New York fathers generally take pretty good care of their little ones
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken on 6th Avenue, between 11th and 12th Street.

***************

This set of photographs is based on a extremely simple idea: stroll each block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what takes place. To steer clear of missing something, walk both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be much more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s much more than I am willing to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, a lot more adventurous photographers.

Oh, truly, there is a single much more tiny detail: leave the photos alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually concentrate on the 1st of these &quotevery-block&quot photographs, I will have taken much more than eight,000 pictures on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus one more a number of thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the different spots in NYC where I traditionally take images. So I never count on to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot images, and hope that I will be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth seeking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve utilized to select the tiny subset of every single-block pictures that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. Initial, I’ll upload any photo that I feel is &quotgreat,&quot and exactly where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-pals will be, &quotI have no idea when or where that photo was taken, but it’s actually a terrific image!&quot

A second criterion has to do with spot, and the third requires time. I am hoping that I’ll take some photographs that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anybody who looks at it. Clearly, specific landscape icons like the Empire State Creating or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I am hoping that I will discover other, a lot more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be able to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from yet another component of the country, or yet another element of the world, I know that that is New York!&quot And there may well be some images exactly where a &quotnon-regional&quot viewer might say, &quotI had no concept that there was anyplace in New York City that was so exciting/stunning/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I bear in mind wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing a variety of shops, stores, restaurants, and company establishments — and then casually searching at the photos about five years later, and being stunned by how considerably had changed. Tiny by tiny, store by retailer, day by day, things change … and when you’ve been around as long as I have, it really is even far more remarkable to go back and appear at the photographs you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask your self, &quotWas it actually like that back then? Seriously, did men and women actually put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be looking at these every-block images 5 or ten years from now (and perhaps you will be, too), I am going to be doing my very best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they had been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no thought what we’re calling this decade however). Or perhaps they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years soon after 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial instance of such a time-certain image I’ve already taken a bunch, and I never know if I will eventually determine that they are worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are an additional apparent example of a time-certain phenomenon and even even though I’m absolutely not a fashion professional, I suspected that I’ll be able to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we really wear shirts like that? Did women truly wear these weird skirts that are brief in the front, and lengthy in the back? Did every person in New York have a tattoo?&quot

Another example: I am fascinated by the interactions that men and women have with their cellphones out on the street. It appears that every person has one, which definitely wasn’t accurate a decade ago and it appears that everybody walks down the street with their eyes and their complete conscious focus riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that might be going on (amongst other items, that makes it really effortless for me to photograph them without their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I can’t help asking yourself whether or not this sort of social behavior will look bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted straight into our eyeballs.

Oh, one final thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise particulars of every day’s photo-stroll. I’ll be updating it each and every day, and the most recent part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it every day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this hyperlink

URL hyperlink to Ed’s every-block progress by means of Manhattan

If you have any ideas about places that I need to undoubtedly go to to get some great images, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your tiny corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e mail me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

New Yorkers will put their feet up and rest wherever they can find a quiet spot …

Sunday, March 8th, 2015

A handful of good Eye Tattoos photos I found:

New Yorkers will put their feet up and rest wherever they can discover a quiet spot …
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken at the corner of Perry and Washington Streets.

***************

This set of photos is based on a quite basic concept: walk every single block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what takes place. To keep away from missing anything, walk each sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s far more than I am prepared to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, much more adventurous photographers.

Oh, truly, there’s 1 much more small detail: leave the photographs alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I truly focus on the initial of these &quotevery-block&quot photographs, I will have taken much more than 8,000 images on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another a number of thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the a variety of spots in NYC where I traditionally take images. So I do not expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot images, and hope that I will be in a position to make an objective selection of the ones worth hunting at.

As for the criteria that I’ve employed to choose the small subset of every single-block photographs that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. 1st, I’ll upload any photo that I feel is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-friends will be, &quotI have no concept when or where that photo was taken, but it really is genuinely a terrific image!&quot

A second criterion has to do with location, and the third involves time. I am hoping that I’ll take some photographs that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to anyone who looks at it. Clearly, specific landscape icons like the Empire State Developing or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I’ll discover other, a lot more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be in a position to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to someone from yet another component of the nation, or another portion of the world, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there may possibly be some images exactly where a &quotnon-regional&quot viewer may possibly say, &quotI had no notion that there was anyplace in New York City that was so intriguing/stunning/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I remember wandering about my neighborhood in 2005, photographing different shops, shops, restaurants, and company establishments — and then casually looking at the images about five years later, and becoming stunned by how much had changed. Small by little, store by retailer, day by day, issues change … and when you have been around as lengthy as I have, it’s even much more wonderful to go back and look at the pictures you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask your self, &quotWas it really like that back then? Seriously, did people truly put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I’ll be looking at these every single-block photos 5 or ten years from now (and perhaps you will be, also), I am going to be performing my greatest to capture scenes that convey the sense that they had been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no concept what we’re calling this decade yet). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years after 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I never know if I will eventually choose that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are an additional clear instance of a time-specific phenomenon and even though I’m certainly not a style expert, I suspected that I’ll be capable to appear at some pictures ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we actually put on shirts like that? Did females really wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

An additional instance: I am fascinated by the interactions that people have with their cellphones out on the street. It appears that everyone has one, which undoubtedly wasn’t correct a decade ago and it appears that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious focus riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that may possibly be going on (amongst other items, that makes it really simple for me to photograph them without having their even noticing, especially if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I cannot assist asking yourself regardless of whether this kind of social behavior will appear bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have turn out to be so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted straight into our eyeballs.

Oh, one particular last thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise specifics of every single day’s photo-walk. I will be updating it every day, and the most current component of my each and every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL hyperlink to Ed’s every single-block progress by way of Manhattan

If you have any ideas about locations that I need to undoubtedly go to to get some very good images, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your small corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e mail me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Keep tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

Caesar Passeé at Penn Station, #1
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This video was taken in the Penn Station subway quit at 34th Street.

***************

This set of photos is primarily based on a quite basic notion: walk every single block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what occurs. To stay away from missing something, stroll both sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s much more than I’m willing to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, far more adventurous photographers.

Oh, really, there is one particular a lot more tiny detail: leave the pictures alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I really focus on the first of these &quotevery-block&quot photos, I will have taken far more than eight,000 photos on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus another several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the various spots in NYC where I traditionally take photos. So I don’t expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot pictures, and hope that I will be capable to make an objective choice of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve utilized to choose the tiny subset of each-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. Very first, I will upload any photo that I think is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-pals will be, &quotI have no notion when or where that photo was taken, but it’s genuinely a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with location, and the third involves time. I am hoping that I’ll take some pictures that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to any person who appears at it. Certainly, particular landscape icons like the Empire State Developing or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I am hoping that I will discover other, more unexpected examples. I hope that I’ll be in a position to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that’s not recognizable to somebody from another part of the nation, or another element of the globe, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there might be some photos where a &quotnon-neighborhood&quot viewer might say, &quotI had no concept that there was anyplace in New York City that was so fascinating/stunning/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I bear in mind wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing a variety of shops, shops, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually seeking at the photographs about five years later, and getting stunned by how considerably had changed. Tiny by tiny, retailer by shop, day by day, issues adjust … and when you have been about as extended as I have, it’s even far more remarkable to go back and look at the photographs you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask your self, &quotWas it truly like that back then? Seriously, did men and women truly wear bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I’ll be hunting at these every-block pictures 5 or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, as well), I am going to be doing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they had been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no thought what we’re calling this decade however). Or maybe they’ll just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years soon after 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial example of such a time-specific image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll eventually determine that they’re worth uploading. Women’s fashion/styles are yet another obvious example of a time-specific phenomenon and even even though I am absolutely not a style expert, I suspected that I’ll be capable to look at some pictures ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we genuinely wear shirts like that? Did women genuinely wear these weird skirts that are short in the front, and extended in the back? Did every person in New York have a tattoo?&quot

Another instance: I’m fascinated by the interactions that men and women have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everybody has one particular, which definitely wasn’t accurate a decade ago and it appears that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their complete conscious consideration riveted on this little box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that may be going on (among other things, that tends to make it quite straightforward for me to photograph them with no their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a phone conversation). But I cannot help asking yourself no matter whether this sort of social behavior will look bizarre a decade from now … especially if our cellphones have turn into so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted directly into our eyeballs.

Oh, one final issue: I’ve designed a customized Google Map to show the precise particulars of each day’s photo-stroll. I’ll be updating it every day, and the most recent element of my every single-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this link

URL hyperlink to Ed’s each and every-block progress via Manhattan

If you have any recommendations about areas that I ought to absolutely pay a visit to to get some excellent photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your small corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Stay tuned as the photo-walk continues, block by block …

EDITORIAL USE ONLY A new digital art project has re-imagined a quantity of Hollywood stars as they could have looked had they lived in 2015 using the Samsung Galaxy Note four. The subjects have been selected following a poll by Samsung which named Audrey Hepburn, Elvis

Thursday, March 5th, 2015

Some cool Star Tattoos pictures:

EDITORIAL USE ONLY A new digital art project has re-imagined a quantity of Hollywood stars as they could have looked had they lived in 2015 making use of the Samsung Galaxy Note four. The subjects were chosen following a poll by Samsung which named Audrey Hepburn, Elvis
Star Tattoos

Image by TaylorHerring
EDITORIAL USE ONLY A new digital art project has re-imagined a quantity of Hollywood stars as they might have looked had they lived in 2015 employing the Samsung Galaxy Note 4. The subjects have been chosen following a poll by Samsung which named Audrey Hepburn, Elvis Presley, Grace Kelly, James Dean and Marilyn Monroe as the most influential Hollywood style icons of all time. James Dean would nevertheless have rocked the rebel appear, with a full-sleeve tattoo, a longer slicked back hair-style and full beard.

EDITORIAL USE ONLY A new digital art project has re-imagined a quantity of Hollywood stars as they might have looked had they lived in 2015 making use of the Samsung Galaxy Note four. The subjects have been chosen following a poll by Samsung which named Audrey Hepburn, Elvis
Star Tattoos

Image by TaylorHerring
EDITORIAL USE ONLY A new digital art project has re-imagined a number of Hollywood stars as they could have looked had they lived in 2015 using the Samsung Galaxy Note 4. The subjects had been chosen following a poll by Samsung which named Audrey Hepburn, Elvis Presley, Grace Kelly, James Dean and Marilyn Monroe as the most influential Hollywood style icons of all time. James Dean would nonetheless have rocked the rebel look, with a full-sleeve tattoo, a longer slicked back hair-style and complete beard.

New Yorkers also consider that *they* are “the whole globe”

Saturday, February 21st, 2015

A couple of good Eye Tattoos images I identified:

New Yorkers also believe that *they* are “the whole world”
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This was taken on the corner of LeRoy and Hudson in Greenwich Village.

***************

This set of photographs is primarily based on a really basic idea: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To steer clear of missing something, walk both sides of the street.

That is all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be a lot more ambitious, you could also walk the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that is more than I am prepared to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, far more adventurous photographers.

Oh, in fact, there is one a lot more small detail: leave the photographs alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I actually concentrate on the very first of these &quotevery-block&quot images, I will have taken more than 8,000 photos on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus an additional many thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the different spots in NYC exactly where I traditionally take pictures. So I never expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot photos, and hope that I’ll be capable to make an objective choice of the ones worth hunting at.

As for the criteria that I’ve used to pick the little subset of every single-block photos that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. First, I’ll upload any photo that I think is &quotgreat,&quot and exactly where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-close friends will be, &quotI have no concept when or where that photo was taken, but it is really a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with location, and the third requires time. I’m hoping that I will take some images that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to any individual who appears at it. Obviously, certain landscape icons like the Empire State Constructing or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I am hoping that I will find other, a lot more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be in a position to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that is not recognizable to someone from yet another portion of the nation, or yet another component of the planet, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there may possibly be some photographs exactly where a &quotnon-local&quot viewer might say, &quotI had no notion that there was anyplace in New York City that was so exciting/beautiful/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I bear in mind wandering about my neighborhood in 2005, photographing different shops, shops, restaurants, and organization establishments — and then casually seeking at the images about 5 years later, and being stunned by how a lot had changed. Small by little, retailer by shop, day by day, issues modify … and when you’ve been around as lengthy as I have, it is even a lot more amazing to go back and appear at the images you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask yourself, &quotWas it really like that back then? Seriously, did folks truly put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I’ll be searching at these every single-block photographs 5 or ten years from now (and maybe you will be, also), I’m going to be performing my greatest to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no thought what we’re calling this decade however). Or possibly they’ll just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years following 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial example of such a time-distinct image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I do not know if I will ultimately make a decision that they are worth uploading. Women’s fashion/designs are yet another clear example of a time-particular phenomenon and even even though I am definitely not a style expert, I suspected that I’ll be in a position to look at some images ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we really put on shirts like that? Did ladies actually wear those weird skirts that are short in the front, and lengthy in the back? Did absolutely everyone in New York have a tattoo?&quot

Yet another example: I am fascinated by the interactions that folks have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everybody has one particular, which undoubtedly wasn’t accurate a decade ago and it seems that everyone walks down the street with their eyes and their entire conscious consideration riveted on this small box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about anything else that may be going on (amongst other things, that tends to make it very simple for me to photograph them with out their even noticing, specifically if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I can’t help asking yourself no matter whether this type of social behavior will look bizarre a decade from now … specifically if our cellphones have grow to be so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted straight into our eyeballs.

Oh, one last issue: I’ve developed a customized Google Map to show the precise particulars of every single day’s photo-walk. I’ll be updating it every day, and the most current part of my each-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it each day to see where I’ve been, by clicking on this hyperlink

URL link to Ed’s each-block progress by way of Manhattan

If you have any recommendations about areas that I ought to certainly check out to get some excellent images, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your little corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Keep tuned as the photo-stroll continues, block by block …

We have excellent billboards in NYC
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This photo was taken on 10th Avenue and 25th Street.

***************

This set of pictures is based on a quite straightforward concept: stroll each block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what takes place. To keep away from missing something, stroll both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be much more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s more than I am willing to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, more adventurous photographers.

Oh, actually, there’s one much more little detail: leave the images alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I truly focus on the initial of these &quotevery-block&quot photographs, I will have taken more than eight,000 photos on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus one more several thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the numerous spots in NYC where I traditionally take photographs. So I don’t count on to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot photographs, and hope that I’ll be in a position to make an objective selection of the ones worth looking at.

As for the criteria that I’ve employed to select the little subset of each and every-block images that get uploaded to Flickr: there are 3. 1st, I’ll upload any photo that I feel is &quotgreat,&quot and where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-pals will be, &quotI have no thought when or exactly where that photo was taken, but it is really a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with spot, and the third involves time. I am hoping that I will take some photos that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to any individual who looks at it. Clearly, specific landscape icons like the Empire State Creating or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I am hoping that I’ll locate other, far more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be capable to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that’s not recognizable to an individual from yet another part of the nation, or yet another part of the globe, I know that that is New York!&quot And there may be some photos where a &quotnon-regional&quot viewer may well say, &quotI had no thought that there was anyplace in New York City that was so exciting/lovely/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I don’t forget wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing a variety of shops, retailers, restaurants, and business establishments — and then casually searching at the photographs about five years later, and being stunned by how considerably had changed. Tiny by small, retailer by store, day by day, items adjust … and when you’ve been about as lengthy as I have, it really is even more amazing to go back and look at the photographs you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask oneself, &quotWas it truly like that back then? Seriously, did individuals really put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be hunting at these each-block pictures five or ten years from now (and possibly you will be, also), I’m going to be undertaking my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they were taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no notion what we’re calling this decade yet). Or possibly they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years right after 9-11&quot.

Film posters are a trivial instance of such a time-particular image I’ve currently taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I will eventually determine that they are worth uploading. Women’s style/designs are one more clear example of a time-distinct phenomenon and even although I’m undoubtedly not a fashion specialist, I suspected that I will be able to appear at some photos ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we truly put on shirts like that? Did females actually wear these weird skirts that are short in the front, and long in the back? Did everybody in New York have a tattoo?&quot

An additional example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that individuals have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that everybody has one, which surely wasn’t accurate a decade ago and it appears that every person walks down the street with their eyes and their whole conscious consideration riveted on this small box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that may possibly be going on (among other things, that makes it really easy for me to photograph them without having their even noticing, specifically if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I cannot help asking yourself regardless of whether this kind of social behavior will look bizarre a decade from now … particularly if our cellphones have turn out to be so miniaturized that they are incorporated into the glasses we put on, or implanted straight into our eyeballs.

Oh, a single final thing: I’ve created a customized Google Map to show the precise particulars of each day’s photo-stroll. I will be updating it every day, and the most current part of my each and every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it every single day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this hyperlink

URL hyperlink to Ed’s each-block progress via Manhattan

If you have any ideas about places that I need to definitely check out to get some great pictures, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your tiny corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can e mail me directly at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Keep tuned as the photo-stroll continues, block by block …

Dad, this is totally unacceptable! I just never feel I can be noticed in public with two such poorly dressed parents!
Eye Tattoos

Image by Ed Yourdon
This photo was taken close to the corner of Barrow and Hudson Street in Greenwich Village.

***************

This set of photos is primarily based on a really straightforward concept: walk every block of Manhattan with a camera, and see what happens. To keep away from missing vanything, stroll both sides of the street.

That’s all there is to it …

Of course, if you wanted to be far more ambitious, you could also stroll the streets of Brooklyn, Queens, Staten Island, and the Bronx. But that’s a lot more than I am prepared to commit to at this point, and I will leave the remaining boroughs of New York City to other, far more adventurous photographers.

Oh, really, there is one a lot more small detail: leave the pictures alone for a month — unedited, untouched, and unviewed. By the time I in fact focus on the 1st of these &quotevery-block&quot photographs, I will have taken a lot more than 8,000 photos on the nearby streets of the Upper West Side — plus one more many thousand in Rome, Coney Island, and the a variety of spots in NYC where I traditionally take images. So I do not expect to be emotionally attached to any of the &quotevery-block&quot photographs, and hope that I will be able to make an objective selection of the ones worth searching at.

As for the criteria that I’ve utilised to choose the little subset of every single-block pictures that get uploaded to Flickr: there are three. Very first, I’ll upload any photo that I believe is &quotgreat,&quot and exactly where I hope the reaction of my Flickr-close friends will be, &quotI have no notion when or exactly where that photo was taken, but it really is genuinely a terrific picture!&quot

A second criterion has to do with location, and the third requires time. I am hoping that I’ll take some pictures that clearly say, &quotThis is New York!&quot to any person who looks at it. Naturally, specific landscape icons like the Empire State Building or the Statue of Liberty would satisfy that criterion but I’m hoping that I’ll find other, a lot more unexpected examples. I hope that I will be able to take some shots that will make a &quotlocal&quot viewer say, &quotWell, even if that’s not recognizable to someone from another component of the country, or one more portion of the world, I know that that’s New York!&quot And there may be some photos where a &quotnon-regional&quot viewer might say, &quotI had no concept that there was anyplace in New York City that was so interesting/lovely/ugly/spectacular.&quot

As for the sense of time: I bear in mind wandering around my neighborhood in 2005, photographing a variety of shops, retailers, restaurants, and company establishments — and then casually searching at the pictures about five years later, and becoming stunned by how considerably had changed. Tiny by tiny, store by shop, day by day, items modify … and when you have been about as long as I have, it’s even far more incredible to go back and look at the images you took thirty or forty years ago, and ask your self, &quotWas it genuinely like that back then? Seriously, did men and women truly put on bell-bottom jeans?&quot

So, with the expectation that I will be searching at these each-block pictures 5 or ten years from now (and possibly you will be, too), I am going to be performing my best to capture scenes that convey the sense that they had been taken in the year 2013 … or at least sometime in the decade of the 2010’s (I have no notion what we’re calling this decade but). Or possibly they will just say to us, &quotThis is what it was like a dozen years following 9-11&quot.

Movie posters are a trivial instance of such a time-certain image I’ve already taken a bunch, and I don’t know if I’ll in the end choose that they are worth uploading. Women’s fashion/types are an additional obvious example of a time-distinct phenomenon and even although I’m certainly not a fashion specialist, I suspected that I’ll be capable to look at some pictures ten years from now and mutter to myself, &quotDid we actually put on shirts like that? Did females genuinely put on those weird skirts that are quick in the front, and lengthy in the back? Did everybody in New York have a tattoo?&quot

One more example: I’m fascinated by the interactions that folks have with their cellphones out on the street. It seems that absolutely everyone has one particular, which undoubtedly wasn’t true a decade ago and it appears that every person walks down the street with their eyes and their whole conscious consideration riveted on this tiny box-like gadget, utterly oblivious about something else that might be going on (amongst other issues, that makes it extremely effortless for me to photograph them without having their even noticing, particularly if they’ve also got earphones so they can listen to music or carry on a telephone conversation). But I can not support wondering whether this kind of social behavior will seem bizarre a decade from now … particularly if our cellphones have become so miniaturized that they’re incorporated into the glasses we wear, or implanted straight into our eyeballs.

Oh, 1 last point: I’ve developed a customized Google Map to show the precise information of each and every day’s photo-stroll. I will be updating it each and every day, and the most current part of my every-block journey will be marked in red, to differentiate it from all of the older segments of the journey, which will be shown in blue. You can see the map, and peek at it every single day to see exactly where I’ve been, by clicking on this hyperlink

URL link to Ed’s each and every-block progress through Manhattan

If you have any suggestions about locations that I need to absolutely pay a visit to to get some great photos, or if you’d like me to photograph you in your tiny corner of New York City, please let me know. You can send me a Flickr-mail message, or you can email me straight at ed-at-yourdon-dot-com

Remain tuned as the photo-stroll continues, block by block …

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