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Image from page 212 of “Expeditions organized or participated in by the Smithsonian Institution..” (1912)
Wings Tattoos

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Identifier: expeditionsorgan191013191516smit
Title: Expeditions organized or participated in by the Smithsonian Institution..
Year: 1912 (1910s)
Authors: Smithsonian Institution
Subjects: Scientific expeditions
Publisher: Washington, D.C. : Smithsonian Institution

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there have been but few who had been entitled to have the ceremony per-formed, l)ecause war honors had been not very easily won and few werewealthy adequate to aiTord the expense of the ceremonies. When,for the duration of the final century, wars among the various tribes ceased, thereal significance of the rite vanished, but the superstitious belief thatthe symbolic figures meant long life to the person so tattooed, re-mained prominently in the minds of the folks. About the time that the appropriate of the honored warrior to the exclu-sive use of the Tattooing Ceremonies came to an end, a new condi-tion arose which materially changed the character of the rite. Fromthe sales of lands to the United States the Osage tribe acquired awealth by which a greater quantity of its members have been enabled to NO. 8 SMITHSONIAN EXPLORATIONS, I913 67 have performed the tattooing, as well as other ceremonies. It wasthen that this ancient rite became the means by which any individualcould publicly show his affection toward a relative.

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Fig 64.—An Osage Indian with tattouing. Figure 64 shows designs tattooed u])on the l)ody of a man. Thoseon a lady are much more elaborate and cover the upper part of herbody, breast and back, and the reduced component of her legs. Figure 65 shows 68 SMITHSONTAX M ISCELI.ANEOrS COLLECTIONS VOL. 63 three implements used in tattooing. Every of these is created ofwood aljout the length of a pencil. To the reduced finish are attachedneedles arranged in a straight row, and to the upper finish are fastenedfour small rattles produced of the large wing (|uills of the |)elican. This

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Image from web page 118 of “Bird-life: a guide to the study of our typical birds” (1901)
Wings Tattoos

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Identifier: cu31924022527000
Title: Bird-life: a guide to the study of our typical birds
Year: 1901 (1900s)
Authors: Chapman, Frank M. (Frank Michler), 1864-1945 Seton, Ernest Thompson, 1860-1946
Subjects: Birds Birds
Publisher: New York, D. Appleton

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th it he woos his mate andgives voice to the joyousness of nesting time. In someinstances vocal music might be replaced by instrumental,as in the case of the drumming wing-beat of the Grouse,or the bill-tattoo of the Woodpeckers, each of which areanalogous to song. The season of song corresponds far more or much less closelywith the mating season, though some species begin tosing long before their courting days are near. Othersmay sing to some extent throughout the year, but thereal song period is in the spring. Many birds have a second song period immediatelyafter the completion of their postbreeding molt, but itusually lasts only for a few dajs, and is in no sense com-parable to the true season of song. This is heralded bythe Song Sparrow, whose sweet chant, late in February, * See Witchell, The Evolution of Bird Song (Macmlllan Co.).Bioknell, A Study of the Singing of Our Birds The Axik (New Yorkcity), vol. i, 1884, pp. 60-71, 136-140, 209-318, 333-332 vol. ii, 1885,pp. 144-154, 349-363. 63

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Web page 110. Plate XX. SCKEECH OWL. Length, 9-40 inches. Upper parts gray, or bright reddish brown, andblacli beneath parts white, gray, or vibrant reddish brown, and blaclieyes yellow. VOICE OP BIRDS. 63 is a most welcome promise of spring. Then stick to theEobins, Blackbirds, and other migrants, until, late inMay, the wonderful springtime chorus is at its height. The Bobolink is the 1st bird to desert the choir.We do not often hear him soon after July 5. Quickly he is fol-lowed by the Veery, and each day now shows some freshvacancy in the ranks of the feathered singers, till byAugust 5 we have left only the Wood Pewee, IndigoBunting, and Eed-eyed Vireo—tireless songsters whofear neither midsummer nor midday heat. Get in touch with-Notes.—The call-notes of birds are even moreworthy of our consideration than are their songs. Song isthe outburst of a particular emotion get in touch with-notes form thelanguage of every single day. Numerous of us are familiar withbirds songs, but who knows their every call-note andwho can tell us what every

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