A couple of good Wolf Tattoos photos I identified:

Image from page 656 of “The uncivilized races of men in all nations of the planet being a complete account of their manners and customs, and of their physical, social, mental, moral and religious traits. By Rev. J. G. Wood… With new desi
Wolf Tattoos

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Identifier: uncivilizedraces01wood
Title: The uncivilized races of guys in all countries of the world getting a extensive account of their manners and customs, and of their physical, social, mental, moral and religious characteristics. By Rev. J. G. Wood… With new styles by Angas, Danby, Wolf, Zwecker… 1871
Year: 1877 (1870s)
Authors: Wood, John George, 1827-1889
Subjects: Ethnology. Manners and customs. Savages
Publisher: J. B. Burr and company

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as well as the elaborate tattoo withwhich the females love to decorate everyinch of the physique and limbs from the neck tothe ideas of the fingers and toes. Under are the portraits of two males. One particular,a priest, has covered his shaven head with awhite turban, the mark of the iniesthoodamong the Abyssinians, amongst whom thelaity wear no head covering save theirhigifily-decorated and well-greased locks.The second portrait is the profile view ofa man, and gives a very good thought of the cast ofcountenance. The reader may possibly scarcely be-lieve that the Abyssinians have been citedby a particular college of philanthropists asexamples of the intellectual capability of thenegro. Subsequent to the private look of theAbyssinians comes their dress. Varyingslightly in diverse parts of the country,and changing in some of its specifics accord-ing to the style of the day, the dress of theAijyssinians is basically the exact same through-out the kingdom. The principal articles ofdress are trousers, and a huge mantle or quarry.

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(2.) ABYSSINIAN HEADS. (See web page 642.)(843) THE QUAEEY ANIj THE TEOUSERS. 645 The trousers are of soft cotton, and oftwo kinds, the 1 descending some threeinches beneath the knee, and the other termi-nating the identical distance above it. Thetrousers are really tight, and an Abyssiniandandy will put on them of so quite close a fitthat to get them on is almost an hourswork. Round the waist is rolled the sash or belt,about a single yard in width. This is also ofcotton, and varies in length according tothe fineness of the material. A commonbelt will be about fifteen yards in length,but a very fine a single, which only includes thesame amount of material, will be from fiftyto sixty yards long. From thirty to fortyyards is the ordinary length for an Abys-sinian gentlemans belt. It is put on byholding the end with 1 hand to the side,and getting a pal to spread it with hishands, although the wearer turns round androimd, and so winds himself up in the belt,just as our ofiicers did when the lengthy silksashes wer

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Image from page 302 of “Annual report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution” (1846)
Wolf Tattoos

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Identifier: annualreportofbo1888smiths
Title: Annual report of the Board of Regents of the Smithsonian Institution
Year: 1846 (1840s)
Authors: Smithsonian Institution. Board of Regents United States National Museum. Report of the U.S. National Museum Smithsonian Institution. Report of the Secretary
Subjects: Smithsonian Institution Smithsonian Institution. Archives Discoveries in science
Publisher: Washington : Smithsonian Institution

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Haida Tattooing. From photographs by the author and sketches by James G. Swan, of Port Townsend, Washington. Fig. 2. Style copied from the back of Chief Kitkun, representing Wasko, a myth-ological getting of the wolf species. Fig. 3a. Tattooed style on the back of the Haida (shown in Fig. four) representingthe Thunder-bird. Fig. db. Design and style on the leg of the Haida (shown in Fig. 4),-half way in between theknee and thigh, representing the squid octopus. Fig. 3c. Design and style on the skin of the Haida (shown in Fig. four) just beneath the knee,representing Tlankostan, the frog. Fig. four. Young Haida from Queen Charlotte Islands, British Columbia. Tlie tattoomark on the breast represents Hoorts, the bear, and that on his fore-armKoot, the eagle. Report of National Museum, 1888.—Niblack. Plate V.

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Haida Tattooing. THE INDIANS OF THE NORTHWEST COAST. 257 of a pulley to preserve it in place. Every succeeding year a bigger andlarger lip-block is inserted, the effect becoming in old age to drag the lipdown, exposing the discolored and worn teeth, and forming altogether,to the European, a disgusting spectacle, but to them a thing of beautyand a token of rank, maturity, and social position. In running, it flopsup and down among the nose and chin in a quite undignified manner.It is as embarrassing to an Indian lady to be seen without her labret asfor a European lady to be observed with uncovered bosom.* Femaleslaves have been invariably forbidden the privilege of wearing them. Thesize of the labret measures the social significance and wealth of tliewearer. The custom is now dying out, but is nevertheless noticed amongst theolder Haida girls, the labrets becoming principally made of wood. Form-erly it was the custom to ornament them with copper and inlay themwith haliotis shell by way of beautifying them. They var

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Please note that these images are extracted from scanned web page photos that may possibly have been digitally enhanced for readability – coloration and look of these illustrations may not completely resemble the original work.